Flight forced to divert after passenger tries opening door at 38,000ft for a smoke

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 16 Second

A passenger on an international flight has been reported to have attempted to open the door of the plane while at 38,000 ft so he could smoke.

The international flight had according to reports, been forced to divert following the actions of the passenger during the Vancouver bound flight on Sunday, May 22, 2016.

Officials have disclosed that the Lufthansa flight had been forced to divert from Munich to Hamburg where the man, who had been behaving increasingly erratically, had been forcefully removed.

Hamburg police confirms that a rescue crew which had included a doctor, had met the man upon arrival at the airport in Hamburg, diagnosing him with a mental disorder.

He was later taken to a local psychiatric facility while the reports also reveal that no active police investigation into the incident have been launched.

Another passenger on the flight identified as Dan Iosch, from Vancouver, told CBCnews:

“It was reported that there was a man in the back of the plane screaming and yelling and apparently tried to open the back door of the aircraft at 38,000 feet.

“Apparently at the beginning of the flight he was being a little difficult, but they decided to take off.

“I guess once we got in the air he got more and more agitated and he tried to light up a cigarette. He was yelling and screaming.”

The man was escorted from the Airbus A340-600 by paramedics and other officials down to the local psychiatric facility in the city.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Desmond Tutu’s daughter stripped of priestly duties over gay marriage

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 39 Second

Archbishop, Desmond Tutu’s daughter, Reverend Canon, Mpho Tutu-van Furth has reportedly been stripped of her duties as a priest in South Africa’s Anglican church following her marriage to her lesbian partner, Professor Marceline van Furth.

The reverend disclosed this to AFP today, May 24, 2016, adding that she is no longer allowed to preside over holy communion, weddings, baptisms or funerals after handing in her licence simply because the church does not recognise gay marriages.

Reverend Mpho also revealed that her father, the retired archbishop and celebrated anti-apartheid campaigner, Tutu, was “sad but not surprised” at the news.

Mpho stated in an email which read:

“The canon (law) of the South African Church states that marriage is between one man and one woman.

“After my marriage… the Bishop of Saldanha Bay was advised that he must revoke my licence. I offered to return my licence rather than require that he take it from me.”

Mpho and Marceline Tutu-van Furth have reportedly been on honeymoon on the Indonesian island of Bali, and had held a wedding party outside of Cape Town earlier in May.

Tutu, 84, who has reportedly been in frail health had been present at the celebrations with his wife which is not surprising as he has previously spoken out in favour of gay marriage.

The couple who are both divorced and have had kids, had gotten married in the Netherlands in December, 2015.

Speaking with the South African City Press Newspaper, Mpho said:

“My wife and I meet across almost every dimension of difference. Some of our differences are obvious; she is tall and white, I am black and vertically challenged.

“Ironically, coming from a past where difference was the instrument of division, it is our sameness that is now the cause of distress.”

Senior local priest at the Saldanha diocese, Bruce Jenneker told AFP that church had received Mpho’s licence with “sadness”, adding that “It was a great pity that it had to happen.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

NIGERIA: University bomb kills gardener, injures two students

0 0
Read Time:57 Second

A bomb at Sanaa University killed a gardener and wounded at least two students on Tuesday, police and medical sources said, in a relatively rare attack on the Houthi-ruled Yemeni capital.

A police official at the scene said the explosion appeared to have targeted an exhibition organised by the Houthi’s Ansarullah group, which controls most of northern Yemen.

No one has claimed responsibility for the bombing.

Islamist militants have exploited Yemen’s 14-month civil war which has pitted the Iran-allied Houthis against supporters of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, who is backed by a Saudi Arab coalition, to strike at both sides at will.

The warring parties, pushed by the common threat posed by the emboldened Islamist militants, have been trying to resolve their differences at U.N.-sponsored peace talks in Kuwait.

Despite the conflict, there have been relatively few recent attacks in Sanaa. Islamic State said it carried out an attack on a mosque in Sanaa last October that killed seven people.

Officials at the main hospital in Sanaa said the gardener, who they did not name, died of injuries sustained in the explosion.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Nigeria: President to commission Calabar Monorail

0 0
Read Time:41 Second

Governor Ben Ayade of Cross River has announced that the Calabar Monorail is set to be commissioned by President Muhammadu Buhari.

He said the commissioning of the project will be to mark his first year in office.

Ayade stated this after a second test ride of the monorail in Calabar.

He said that taking another ride in the monorail was his own way of checking to ensure that the project is ready for commissioning before the President arrives the state.

The Governor stressed that the kick-off of the monorail would boost the state’s economy and would open employment opportunities for the unemployed in the state.

Ayade expressed optimism that everyone visiting will not only have a smooth ride on the rail but a memorable experience.

However, the commissioning date is yet to be ascertained.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

NIGERIA: Court bars Ali Modu Sherif from parading himself as PDP Chairman

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 24 Second

A Federal High Court sitting in Port Harcourt, Rivers State, has ordered the ‘reinstated’ National Chairman of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP), Ali Modu Sheriff, not to parade himself as the party’s chairman.

The court granted the interim restraining injunction on Tuesday, May 24.

The court also barred Adewale Oladipo from parading himself as the national secretary of the party.

The two party leaders were removed from office at the PDP national convention held on Saturday, May 21, and a former governor of Kaduna State, Ahmed Makarfi, was appointed to replace Sheriff.

A Federal High Court in Lagos had earlier on Tuesday nullified Makarfi’s appointment, and ordered the reinstatement of Sheriff.

The court in Port Harcourt has however mandated the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) to recognise the Makarfi committee in all matters pertaining the conduct of primary elections for political offices and the submission of the PDP List of candidates for any elections to be conducted by INEC pending the hearing and determination of the Motion on notice.

The court also granted a restraining order on all members of the party’s National Working Committee from receiving nominations or submitting names to the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) as officers or candidates of the PDP in whatever capacity pending the hearing and determination of the motion on notice brought by the party.

The court also stressed that INEC should not recognise Sherrif and Oladipo or any or all members of the national working committee of the PDP removed from office at the party’s national convention in Port Harcourt, as officers or organs of the PDP pending the hearing and determination of the motion on notice.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

‘Group not fighting any cause, they’re criminals’ – Buratai

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 18 Second

The Chief of Army Staff, Lt. Gen. Tukur Buratai, has described the militant group, Niger Delta Avengers, as criminals, urging Nigerians to expose them.

The group has claimed responsibility for the recent attacks on pipelines and other oil installations in the Niger Delta region.

Buratai stated this in Port Harcourt, Rivers State on Monday, May 23, after the inauguration of soldiers’ accommodation and 500 KVA generator, donated by the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) described the Niger Delta Avengers, NDA, as criminals.

“Whatever these criminals (Niger Delta Avengers) are doing is a criminal act. We will deal with them accordingly,” he said.

“We are looking at all the areas that we should address and we are doing that, including the criminals in the name of Niger Delta Avengers. They are not avenging anything. They are criminals.

“Nobody has offended them. They have their own criminal intentions and we will deal with them accordingly.

“They have been attacking our troops’ locations and killing our soldiers. We will not tolerate that. We will deal with them accordingly, according to the law.

“We will look for them wherever they are. That is how we will treat them. They are not agitating for any enclave or any state.

“They are just committing criminal acts. That is how we see it.”

Buratai was flanked at the event by the General Officer Commanding, GOC, 82 Division, Enugu, Maj.-Gen. Ibrahim Attahiru and the Commander of 2 Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Steve Olabanji; among other top army officers.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

‘We did not know things were this bad,’ Minister says

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 16 Second

The Minister of Transportation, Rotimi Amaechi has called on Nigerians to be patient with the Buhari administration.

Amaechi also said they did not know they were going to meet so many challenges on assumption of office.

He said “We encountered challenges; were we expecting to encounter those challenges? yes; did we think that we will meet the quantum or volume of those challenges?

“We didn’t anticipate that things were this bad. We thought you go to government and there would be money for you to run government and others.”

The minister said this while fielding question from newsmen on Tuesday, May 24, 2016.

Amaechi also said “Now you have the situation where there is no money to run government. I hate to use the word difficult; I hate to use the word impossible but we met things close to difficult and impossibility.

“That is why Nigerians are impatient; they want to see results and for them, change is not about change in structure, it is about change in their pocket.

“Because their pocket is getting dried and they wanted us to put some more resources in their pocket.

“Because of the structural changes that we want to put in place is not getting all that they want to get.

“What I usually say to people is that we beg you to give us time; we will achieve our objective if you give us time and we will both thank God for that opportunity.’’

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

SimbaPay announces single money transfer of up to $45,000 (USD) to Africa

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 38 Second

Technology news: Announcement of SimbaPay’s increased transfer limit raises the bar for digital transaction providers to the African continent

LONDON, United Kingdom, May 3, 2016/ —

SimbaPay (http://www.SimbaPay.com) is revolutionizing the remittance space through its official announcement of raising the single transaction limit to a whopping $45,000. This is substantially higher than the previous transaction limit of $3,000.

According to Victor Karanja, Head of Operations at SimbaPay, sending money home and buying property across Africa has just become a whole lot easier.

“A pain point for customers in the past has been having to undertake multiple transfers to complete a single purchase.”

“A key risk with multiple transfers was exchange rate fluctuation. Sending up to $45,000 with just our mobile app will protect senders from the fluctuation that arises when one splits up the transfer,” said Karanja.

African immigrants in the European countries can now easily complete larger purchases in Africa such as that of property, vehicles and paying large hospital bills or university fees via the SimbaPay app.

As an incentive to users, SimbaPay money transfers of more than $3,000 will also automatically qualify for the daily SimbaPay Discounted Exchange Rates. With the Discounted Exchange Rate, a user gets to transfer money at a more favourable exchange rate than the standard SimbaPay exchange rate.

EU based Africans will now be able to send large amounts of money back home instantly and free of charge.

Money transferred via the service to Africa is credited instantly at the destination mobile money wallet, merchant or bank account.

“What further sets SimbaPay apart from other money transfer services is that the App can do more than just send money directly to mobile money services such as M-Pesa. SimbaPay can also send money to bank accounts in Africa and to Pay Bill merchants such as schools and utility companies,” said Karanja.

The app’s higher transaction limit is immediately available on all SimbaPay platforms including iPhone, iPad, Android and Web.

Accolades

In 2015, SimbaPay was named the Overall Winner at the prestigious Demo Africa 2015 (http://blog.simbapay.com/2015/09/28/simbapay-wins-demo-africa-2015-next-stop-silicon-valley). SimbaPay also launched free, instant transfers to all Nigerian banks last year.

In June 2015 SimbaPay became the first platform in the world to allow Kenyans living abroad to make M-Pesa PayBill payments and the app continues to disrupt the cross-border remittance industry with its focus on extreme speed and convenience.

In April 2016, SimbaPay was selected as one of 10 companies to join the first ever Barclays Accelerator powered by Techstars (http://www.forbes.com/sites/tobyshapshak/2016/04/05/techstars-announces-10-startups-for-first-ever-african-program) in Africa.

How SimbaPay Works

To send money via SimbaPay, Africans living in the EU with a bank account or debit card simply download the SimbaPay app from the Apple AppStore (http://itunes.apple.com/app/id912728134) or Google Play (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.simbapay.simbapayandroid). App users can then proceed to securely make money transfers straight from any smartphone, tablet or computer.

Distributed by APO (African Press Organization) on behalf of SimbaPay.

View multimedia content

To learn more about this announcement, please contact:

SimbaPay:
Alex Maganga, Operational Officer
Email: alex@SimbaPay.com
info@SimbaPay.com
Tel: +44 (0)20 3137 8517
Address: Google Campus , 4-5 Bonhill Street, London, EC2A 4BX

About SimbaPay
SimbaPay (http://www.SimbaPay.com) is an award winning (http://blog.simbapay.com/2015/09/28/simbapay-wins-demo-africa-2015-next-stop-silicon-valley) mobile app transforming the international remittance space. With a focus on extreme speed, convenience and constant innovation, users are able to send money free to loved ones or even merchants in Africa, from wherever they are at any time of day or night.

The company is headquartered in London and can be found online at www.SimbaPay.com .
Blog post: https://blog.SimbaPay.com/2016/05/03/simbapay-announces-single-money-transfer-of-up-to-45000-usd-to-africa/

Twitter: @SimbaPay https://twitter.com/SimbaPay
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SimbaPay

Additional Media

http://www.simbapay.com/images/SimbaPay_logo4_press.png
http://www.simbapay.com/images/SimbaPay_logo4_press.pdf

SOURCE
SimbaPay

Multimedia content

Download logo
Document: SimbaPay Logo

Share
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | Google+ | Tumblr | Reddit | Pinterest | StumbleUpon

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Progress lies on hard work, commitment – Hon. Igbuya

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 35 Second

The Speaker, Delta State House of Assembly, Rt. Hon Monday Igbuya on Saturday paid tribute to workers for their contributions to the country’s economic development. He also praised Governor Ifeanyi Okowa for creating an environment for development and growth.

In a statement in Asaba, Igbuya praised Okowa for creating jobs, promoting investment, paying workers and setting the tone and foundation for economic progress and development.

“This administration is labour friendly. Workers will continue to receive recognition and encouragement. The place of labour will continue to be side by side with the political actors and not one degree lower. The House of Assembly will give the fullest support and protection to workers’ rights” he said.

Igbuya also commended the governor for his efforts and commitment in finding sustainable solutions to the plight of unemployed youth in the state.

He urged the workers to support the administration.

“The future of Delta State is not just in the hands of the government. It is in the hands of the Parliamentary Staff Association of Nigeria (PASAN). It is in the hands of Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC). It is in the hands of Trade Union Congress of Nigeria (TUC)”

He urged workers to follow the governor’s footsteps by adhering to good governance ethics.

“Government is committed to creating jobs, wealth and ensuring a better deal for all. The PDP government is committed to giving Deltans a brighter future. I enjoin you to continue your hard work and commitment to the development of the state.

Stressing that government revenue was still too low to meet ambiguous demands, Igbuya promised to continue sorting out workers grievances.

“With your help, we can weed out ghost workers and ghost pensioners and end the stealing and wastage of public resources” he said.

Government will continue to invest in work and infrastructure” he added.

By Njamanze Fidel

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Education Ain’t Cheap!

0 0
Read Time:8 Minute, 57 Second

The decline in government funding of higher education, the economic downturn, the long decades of unforgivable neglect, along with rapidly rising costs of the different services and products that universities have to provide, have led to steady increases in student and parents outlays over the last two or three decades. There are no indications that costs will go down, neither are there signals that one day university education will be free – as called for by many segments of the society.
All institutions should consider a number of factors to determine the students’ full cost of study.
According to some studies, the major cost drivers are academic and administrative salaries, the rise in the costs of municipal services, including electricity, water, the cost of powering laboratories, libraries and other teaching and learning amenities, and maintenance of infrastructure. The impact of rising costs has also been felt from the naira-dollar exchange rates on the cost of library holdings, as a result of most books and materials for libraries being bought from dollar-denominated countries.
In Nigeria and many other African countries, higher education is recognised as a public good and is therefore, expectedly and understandably highly subsidised by the state. However, increases in student fees have had adverse consequences on students’ ability to access higher education.
While Nigerians find higher education in the country expensive, the cost of university education is comparatively low compared with international institutions. Viewed in dollar terms and the fallen Naira value, Nigeria’s degrees will be perceived as much cheaper in comparison.
There is no doubt that universities are very expensive to run, especially in developing countries such as Nigeria. In most cases, close to 65% of costs are associated with highly qualified and experienced staff, while a further major cost is the provision and maintenance of the university’s domain. Costs also include a wide range of support services such as libraries, laboratories, transport, security, counselling and healthcare services, in addition to the cross-subsidisation of financially disadvantaged students, i.e. university-funded scholarships.
I grew up in the 60s and 70s. I went to four secondary schools in the old Western Nigeria where the standard of education was so high, no matter where the location of the school, urban or rural. I ended up with a good School leaving certificate result that enabled me to, and got an opportunity to go to the University of Ibadan, through passing the entrance “Preliminary” examination, thereby bypassing the old Advanced Level certificate, where I got both an undergraduate degree, and many other unquantifiable skills, experience, abilities and most importantly, a very sophisticated outlook in life, dignity in labour and an expansive view of the world. On the way, I received students’ loans, grants and state bursaries, and now I can hardly say I was disenfranchised, but I used what freedom this great country gave me: an opportunity.
Jon West, “If You Think Education is Expensive…”, This Day, 5th March 2016, write, “With the advent of the military regimes that( mis?)ruled Nigeria from 1966 – 1999, there was a great onslaught on education, knowledge and intellectualism in all facets of national life, due perhaps to the fact that, unlike in other parts of the world, African armies were recruited by the colonialists as internal oppressors of their own people, and what better oppressor is an illiterate or poorly educated person in command of the educated. Officers and other ranks were recruited from the pool of the illiterate and antagonistic ethnicities, in a divide and rule process that ensured the pacification of educated and nationalistic agitators for political and economic Independence. The most horrendous products of this colonial agenda were Idi Amin of Uganda and Jean-Bedel Bokassa of the short-lived Central African Empire”.
We are still living victims of the above, and we seem to be still entrapped and unable to escape. In fact, Nigeria and some West Africans were a bit fortunate to be spared totally from Jon West’s account.
This now brings me to my initial lines of thought.
I have always been one of those who criticise the high fees charged by private universities in Nigeria, especially the ones owned by the Pentecostal and other religious organisations. But another look at this convinced me they are not entirely wrong. Most of the criticism directed at them had been that the members of the congregation, who actually funded the universities through tithes, contributions, Sunday collections, etc., are usually the ones who cannot afford to send their own children to these schools, supposedly owned by them. Another is that the heads of those churches are exploiting the congregation in the process, diverting funds to themselves.
While I agree with the two evidences above, the fact remains that establishing and maintaining those universities were always not going to be cheap. When I attended university in Nigeria, there were only about six universities, all owned and 100% funded by the Federal Government (University of Ibadan; University of Ife, now Obafemi Awolowo University; University of Lagos; Ahmadu Bello University; University of Nigeria, Nsukka; University of Benin; these were later joined by converting University of Ibadan, Jos campus to University of Jos; Universities of Ilorin, Port Harcourt, Maiduguri, Sokoto, and Calabar and Ado Bayero University). These universities were established and built when Nigeria was still “good”, most of them immediately after Independence and during the oil boom era; the people who established them were committed and sincere Nigerians; money was available and international cooperation and collaboration was easily sought and available; and Nigeria was not as corrupt and degenerate as we have now. – things were done at almost 90% altruism.
Then with the creation of more states in Nigeria, come the proliferation of state-owned universities, which, because of our innate political immaturity, often fall victim of discontinuity of government, even during the military tenures. A new governor comes in, jealous of his predecessor, and refuses to continue funding of the state-owned universities and other institutions.
So, when the Federal Government decided to liberalise the education sector (and with some entirely selfish reasons, because those in government who were supposed to facilitate our educational progress, were in fact the ones, who after looting the treasury, now started establishing their own private universities. What an irony!), the churches and other religious organisations started their own venture into the education, or rather, tertiary education sector.
Ordinarily, this would have been greatly commendable. In fact, it is still commendable, as they are complementing the efforts of the federal and state governments in the education sector; but, being Nigerians, their motives have not been entirely holistic or altruistic. It has been full of hypocrisy and self-promotion. However, as I mentioned above, I have now tended to be a bit sympathetic to their situation.
Establishing and maintaining an institution of higher learning (and in fact even primary and secondary schools – ask the mushrooming private operators who have capitalised on government indifference, neglect and lack of focus and vision) in Nigeria is not cheap, and is no mean task. Even the conditions they have to meet before they are granted the licence to establish are usually very daunting. This is evidenced by empty acquired lands going nowhere, university buildings that look more like secondary school classrooms, lack of teaching and library resources, infrastructural problems, lack of IT facilities, and inability to maintain standards for some of them, resulting in the Nigeria Universities Commission coming down hard on several of them and refusing to accredit courses, departments and faculties, thereby leaving many students in limbo.
The Federal Government universities are still highly subsidised to the point that it is ridiculous, and with the downturn in the economy without recourse to oil income, the government might soon have to reconsider its level of subsidisation of tertiary university in Nigeria. The same goes for state universities and other tertiary institutions; these are even finding it difficult to pay staff salaries, so how do they want to equip classrooms, libraries, laboratories, and other services they are expected to provide as institutions of higher learning, which must be of world standard?
So university education is not cheap, and these Pentecostal and other religious operators must be spared some criticism and flagellation. However, one would have suggested that the way out for them to avoid the scathing criticism that their own congregation are not able to afford sending their children to schools that were built with their money, is to give financial concessions to them in terms of reducing fees for members.
But I shudder to think of the abuse that will follow, knowing my country-men and women. That is when pastors and imams will start making more money by falsely attesting that non-members are members; and people will start flooding the already-full churches just to get their children into these schools.
A Catch-22 situation, if you ask me, but a solution, or at least, a compromise, must be found. Some of these private Pentecostal universities are of very high standard. High standard means a lot of investment and funding, and must always be maintained because of competition and world recognition. I personally will not send my child to a university that the world academic community does not recognise, as I would not send him/her to a university where they come out more illiterate than literate.
The corruption in Nigeria is not helping either. With the examination bodies, e.g. WAEC, NECO, JAMB, UTME and whatever names they call themselves all ridden with corruption; the universities engaged in scams, e.g. selling 30,000 forms for only 3000 places, hence university lecturers and non-academic staff involved in all sorts of bribery; parents cutting corners by paying someone else to write exams for their children and offering bribes to get their children in by all means even if those children have not met the minimum or cut-off marks; thereby, all denying legitimate and more hard-working and successful candidates the opportunities that should rightly go to them first.
Finally, like Jon West cited, “If you think education is expensive, why don’t you try ignorance”.
For me and many other Nigerians, I know the value of good education. Both my parents were great educationists in Nigeria, and I know what they imparted to me and my siblings, and indeed, to thousands of students who passed under them.
Those were those days, but I still cherish the legacy and I have passed them on to my children with the prayers and advice that they need to pass it on to their children too.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %