Why Nigerians in America come home to marry

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Read Time:6 Minute, 2 Second

The United States Embassy has data indicating the number of Nigerians who come to join their spouses in the US every year. In this instance, no attempt was made to collect such data. However, several trends were deduced from several exchanges that took place with friends and friends-of-friends and acquaintances in several enclaves in the US. Some of the patterns that emerged include the fact that no fewer than 310 folks embark on this voyage – of which eighty per cent are women. Of this, about two-thirds are Christians with post-secondary education; and two-thirds are between the ages of 25 and 37. Of the base number, eighty-five per cent are from the southern region, with eighty-seven per cent appearing to come from financially-disadvantaged homes.

What is true of the US also seems to be true of Canada, the United Kingdom and various European Union nations. What’s more, the percentages of Nigerians who go overseas to join their spouses, fiances and fiancees have increased twenty-five per cent in the last two decades. It is instructive to note that the immigration process can be trying and costly. Frankly, it is a process that demands a lot of resourcefulness, wits and perseverance. It is a process that, more often than not, results in rejection and depression. Even so, many and many more are willing to undertake this mentally and physically-draining exercise.

But why do Nigerians go though this tortuous immigration process? Why do Nigerian women, living in Nigeria, agree to marrying men they, in most cases, hardly know? And why do Nigerian men go home to marry instead of marrying the women they’ve romanced here in the US. After all, most of the women who are already in the US are well-educated, well-read and well-travelled; they are well mannered and have, in most cases, proved their trustworthiness. These are women of two worlds: they know Africa and also understand the Western society. But in spite of their advantages and pluses, the vast majority of these women are likely to lose their boyfriends to women back home.

In significant numbers, Nigerian men would rather go home to marry the “unknown and the greenhorn” rather than marry the proven and the reliable. Granted that a thousand men have a thousand reasons for going home to marry, there are common threads as to why they do what they do: one, because they can; two, most men are under the illusion that women back home are innocent, un-spoilt and virginal; three, it is an ego-boosting exercise; and four, it allows some men to mask their shortcomings since the women who are already in the US can tell where these men stand on the social and economic ladder. Additionally, some men want their women to look up to them since it makes them appear more than what and who they really are. Other men go home to marry because, as some have stated, “Nigerian girls in the US are rotten, too exposed, too independent and/or too aggressive.”

I am reminded of a friend in Washington who once told me that there was nothing he could teach his girlfriend in terms of romance and sex and everyday reality. Sex, for instance, was awe-inspiring and earthshaking. In the end though, he went home to marry a “village girl,” who pretended for a while before proving that “everything a Yankee can do, a Naija woman can also do.” Shortly thereafter, he also realised he was her one-way ticket out of the misery and poverty that have come to characterise Nigeria. In any case, the majority of such marriages start collapsing within 18 months. The American society has a way of Oprahlising girls from Bauchi, Timbuktu and Aba.

And, of course, there are the traditionalists, the purists: men who don’t mind dating and/or cohabitating with girls from other ethnic groups. But when it is time to start a family, they’d rather a girl from their own ethnic groups. In spite of modernity/westernisation, the majority of Nigerian men living in the US prefer women of the same ethnic group. Ethnicity, as it turns out, is a superseding factor when it comes to marriage.

When it is all said and done, the Nigerian male can be perplexing. His life is full of contradictions. In so many ways, he is a wounded animal as a result of his historical past. There was a time when he was the primary breadwinner, head of the household. He was the man who moved mountains. But that was a time long gone. He misses the past; he misses the era when most men were sheriffs. And frankly, the modern era has not been kind to men (particularly those who have refused to assimilate or acculturate). And even though the outside world is depriving him of his manhood, he has found a way to make parts of his world his playground. In this playground, he is the sole captain. Or so he thought! To make his thoughts a reality, he marries a greenhorn.

More often than not, most of these marriages are not based on love or affection. Most are not even like the marriages of yesteryear: a union between two families. On the part of the greenhorns, it is mostly about the need to escape the prevailing poverty and despair that have engulfed the country. Most of these women are seeking a way out of the misery that Nigeria has become. Therefore, when presented with the opportunity to hop, they pack and run! It should be noted here and now that it is not all the women who come to join their husbands fit this profile. A good number come for the right reasons.

In the end, most that came to join their husbands become disillusioned, disappointed and unhappy and are likely to seek divorce within three years. As for the men, well, some will plead with, cajole or trick their wives into going into the nursing profession. The nursing profession, they believe, is a sure avenue for making money and living the good life. Be it in Houston, Seattle, Dallas, Miami, New York and every where in between, African nurses abound. They are everywhere working mostly the night and graveyard shifts, toiling day and night and away from their husbands and children just to make ends meet. With no time to smell the roses or to wonder at the beauties that surround them, they become strangers in the world they live in.

In the end, a simple question becomes germane: if you find a woman you love and respect and can get along with, what is the point returning to the continent to find the inexperienced? If you already have a woman, here in the US, who makes your heart skip beats and you fancy her worldview, what’s the point in abandoning her? And after several years of putting up with your eccentricity, infantile behaviour and messy bedside manners, what’s the point dumping her for the greenhorn?

Abidde writes from Montgomery, Alabama, USA, vide Sabidde@yahoo.com

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nollywood: Love Idoko drags Nollywood stars to Benue – Uti ,2face & others

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Read Time:2 Minute, 37 Second

Celebrities will once again be taking a trip to Benue as Motivation Magazine of Love Idoko led Dream Pointers Limited holds appreciation event on December 2nd, 2010 for friends who have supported the course of the magazine in the two years of its existence in Makurdi.

Expected on the Red Carpet at the event are Desmond Elliot who will also be the anchor of the event, 2face, Keffe, Gordons and Uti, winner of the Big Brother Africa All Star. Uti will also be hosted as the winner of Big Brother Africa at the event. Revealing her excitement as to the interest of the artistes to be part of the event, Idoko said, “some of artistes that have been with us have indicated support that they will be around, and we are so touched, people like Keffe, Desmond will be around and be the MC, 2face has confirmed that he will be around, Gordons and Uti the big brother Africa winner  who is someone that has been part of us, he has been part of motivation magazine, so we will host him as winner of big brother”.

Speaking further on the Red Carpet event, Ms. Love Idoko, the publisher of Motivation Magazine said “It’s an appreciation dinner and red carpet for Motivation Magazine, Motivation Magazine has been on for over two years, we have enjoyed wide spread acceptance and lot of support from so many people so we thought it wise to have an appreciation dinner with everybody that has supported us, and every body that has stood by us. It is a going to be a very unique dinner and red carpet we re going to have Hip TV, Nigezie, Sound city to cover the event”.

Motivation Magazine has in the last two years been the vanguard of youth motivation in North Central Nigeria. The magazine has featured inspiring stories of Jackie Appaiah, Gordons,Stella Damasus, and a host of others. Ms. Love Idoko while giving reasons for publishing Motivation Magazine said “in every generation, youths play a very vital role because we are the future of this generation, so if you can affect the youths positively, you can also affect your generation positively, so that’s why I believe that focusing on the youth is like if you can change a young person.

“If you wait until you are old to pursue your dream is to waste the person you are, if you wait until you are old to pursue your dream, you are wasting the person God made you to be, so the future we are talking about starts now, this is the future we talk about every day, so as young people, if we can transform and change the mentality of young people positively then our whole generation and the entire future of our country will be changed for the better.”

Dreams pointer international, DREAMS is an acronym for Developing Resourceful Entrepreneurs and Activating Mental Success; so, Dreams pointer international is the name of the organization, Dreams pointers are the publisher of Motivation Magazine

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nollywood: stars showed up in grand style at the premiere of Champion of our time

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Read Time:1 Minute, 33 Second

Nollywood stars Emeka Enyiocha, Lancelot Imasuen, Ernest Obi, Actors Guild of Nigeria president Segun Arinze, Ekah Aribia and others came all out on November 28th, 2010 as ‘Champions of Our Time’ was premiered at the Silverbird Galleria, Victoria Island, Lagos. View the Photo Gallery

The Premiere kicked off around 4pm with a strutted Red Carpet show that gave celebrities room to show off beautiful attires and jewelries. Guests at the premiere could not hold back their emotion as the jam-packed hall was held spell bound from the beginning of the movie till it was taken off the screen.

Champions Of Our Time which has gone ahead to win prestigious awards like the Best Film of the year at ZAFAA International Film Festival and Abuja International Film Festival. It tells the story of two exceptionally brilliant young girls from opposing ends of the social spectrum. They both nurse ambitions of becoming the next winner of the prestigious St. Flairs Foundation Quiz Competition. However, their quest unravels a web of intrigue, high-stakes politicking, corruption in high places, and a culture of neglect and discrimination against the physically challenged amongst us. Suspense-wrapped scenes in the movie showed how far the players went to achieve their dreams in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.

Produced by Veteran Screenwriter, Chidi Nwokeabia, and seasoned Nollywood actor, Emeka Enyiocha, ‘Champions of Our Time’ features established thespians like Segun Arinze, Joke Silva-Jacob, Ngozi Ezeonu, Ejike Asiegbu, Ayo Adesanya, Charles Inojie, and debutants: Treasure Obasi and Feyisola Ewulomi, Paul Adams, Ejike Metu.

A brilliant treatment of its topical subject matter, ‘Champions of our Time’ evoked empathy and got many viewers emotional on the plight of the heroine, the screening however reinforce the belief in the indomitable resilience of the human spirit. View photo gallery

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nollywood: stars showed up in grand style at the premiere of Champion of our time

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Read Time:1 Minute, 33 Second

Nollywood stars Emeka Enyiocha, Lancelot Imasuen, Ernest Obi, Actors Guild of Nigeria president Segun Arinze, Ekah Aribia and others came all out on November 28th, 2010 as ‘Champions of Our Time’ was premiered at the Silverbird Galleria, Victoria Island, Lagos. View the Photo Gallery

The Premiere kicked off around 4pm with a strutted Red Carpet show that gave celebrities room to show off beautiful attires and jewelries. Guests at the premiere could not hold back their emotion as the jam-packed hall was held spell bound from the beginning of the movie till it was taken off the screen.

Champions Of Our Time which has gone ahead to win prestigious awards like the Best Film of the year at ZAFAA International Film Festival and Abuja International Film Festival. It tells the story of two exceptionally brilliant young girls from opposing ends of the social spectrum. They both nurse ambitions of becoming the next winner of the prestigious St. Flairs Foundation Quiz Competition. However, their quest unravels a web of intrigue, high-stakes politicking, corruption in high places, and a culture of neglect and discrimination against the physically challenged amongst us. Suspense-wrapped scenes in the movie showed how far the players went to achieve their dreams in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.

Produced by Veteran Screenwriter, Chidi Nwokeabia, and seasoned Nollywood actor, Emeka Enyiocha, ‘Champions of Our Time’ features established thespians like Segun Arinze, Joke Silva-Jacob, Ngozi Ezeonu, Ejike Asiegbu, Ayo Adesanya, Charles Inojie, and debutants: Treasure Obasi and Feyisola Ewulomi, Paul Adams, Ejike Metu.

A brilliant treatment of its topical subject matter, ‘Champions of our Time’ evoked empathy and got many viewers emotional on the plight of the heroine, the screening however reinforce the belief in the indomitable resilience of the human spirit.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nollywood: Hennessy scores high with Halo concert

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Read Time:3 Minute, 25 Second

Those with a healthy entertainment palate that made it down to the GET Arena on November 27th for the Hennessy Artistry Halo Concert 2010, were not disappointed. Excitement, elation, fun and pleasure are some modest words that describe the experience of the night. Watch the Photo Gallery

From the red carpet where celebrities like Olu Maintain, Caroline Ekanem, Olisa Adibua and DJ Humility strutted, to the stellar performances by living legend, Sir Shina Peters,Nneka, MI, Ice Prince and Bez, the Hennessy Halo Concert stands out as an event with exceptionally well-thought planning.

To set the ball rolling, popular TV personality, Andre Blaze, came up stage to announce the reason for the gathering. He thereafter introduced DJ Tony Blaze and DJ Rexy, and the two DJs took to their turn tables, engaging in a mild competition much to the delight of guests. If the competition between the DJs was fun, then the next performance gave even more, with talk-of-the-moment producer, Kas, taking to the stage with his popular ‘Fi mi le’ track. That got the audience on their feet, and followed suit with ‘If you wind for me’.

Kas’ performance was followed by soulful guitarist Bez, who took to the stage with members of his band. Though not the regular dance hall musician, guests couldn’t help but ask for more during his engaging set. He performed songs off his new album and also did a remix of Fela Anikulapo’s ‘Water’. Bez wasn’t done yet, not until he gave guests a glint of his forthcoming album, performing his yet-to-be-released song, ‘Supersun’.

Andre Blaze, the MC of the night, came back on stage and asked guests what Nigerian song they would they like the DJs to play. Many answers came from different quarters but the shouts for ‘Oleku’ were the most dominant. To this end, Blaze told the DJs to thrill the fans for a while, and not long after, he called Ice Prince onto the stage. Wild applause greeted the Chocolate City artist who took the concert to another level with his tracks ‘Rewind’ and ‘Nobody test me’, which he performed with M.I and Jesse Jagz. He rounded off with the chart buster, ‘Oleku’, which he performed with Brymo.
Next, Nneka emerged on stage in simple jeans and a t-shirt, and showed guests why her unique talent has made her loved the world over. Performing songs like
‘Conversation’, amongst others, international act, Nneka was on point all through the night. The dexterity of her performance matched with the message of her songs was a plus for her that night.

Nneka soon made way for Mr Incredible who came in and did his thing. M.I, being the crowd-puller that he is, got a wild ovation that heralded his entrance on stage. The audience couldn’t have asked for more as the rapper turned the audience on to his tracks, performing hit songs like ‘Anoti’, ‘Superman’, ‘African rapper No.1’ and ‘Gold digger’. MI
got proof that he was the crowd favourite when he asked the audience who the number 1 rapper was, to which the guests chorused “M.I”.

Not finished with the concert yet, all six artists that had featured on the ‘Like A Bottle’ track came upstage to perform the title song.

Like the proverbial big masquerade that caps every festival, Afro-Juju inventor, Sir Shina Peters re-emerged on stage with members of his band to wrap up the event. He performed songs that had made him the toast of the young, old and middle-aged in his heyday. He however proved that he still knew how to interact with the youth, sending the audience wild with his sensational drumbeats.

The Hennessy Artistry Halo Concert is surely one event that will remain in the memory of those who attended for a long time.

Watch the Photo Gallery

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nollywood: Between Kings and Queens – Get Nigeria Premiere Date Ft. Jim Iyke

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Read Time:2 Minute, 1 Second

“Between Kings and Queen”, a movie that was shot in the United States and features Jim Iyke as the only African actor amongst other foreign actors is set to be premiered on the 3rdof December at the Silverbird Galleria in Lagos and will thereafter hit cinemas nationwide.

The award winning’ Between Kings and Queen’ features Nollywood and Hollywood stars like Jim Iyke, Nakia Burisse, Dajuan Johnson and Trenton Rostedt,  and tells the story of Kalu, a young prince from Africa who seeks to escape his royal duties by fleeing to America. His experience in the land of liberty quickly unravels as he finds himself working for a local deli and sleeping on his cousin, Nanna’s couch. Kalu soon crosses paths with the friend of a notorious drug lord in town, his journey takes him on a dangerous path. Enter Susan, a beautiful African-American woman who connects with Kalu as he becomes the target of the drug cartel and a pair of corrupt cops. On the run from both sides of the law, Kalu uses his creativity and stands by his ideals to overcome the challenges he faces in the land of liberty.

According to Joy Dickson,the writer and director of Between Queens and Kings, the movie was inspired by her own personal experiences. She says: “The film explores varied themes such as identity, culture, and moral codes, as well as race relations between African-Americans and Africans. It was guided by Director of Photography Michael Morlan, a 2008 Oscar nominee, and features breakthrough performances by Dajuan Johnson, Nakia Burrise, and Nigerian superstar Jim Iyke”.

Speaking on his experience while working on set of Between Kings and Queens, popular Nollywood actor Jim Iyke  said, “I saw it as a cultural exchange of some sorts. I was basically the only African in the movie but you know the way thespians are , inregardless of the colour .We think alike, we are one minded people ,we are uniformed in our approach to things so in no time it was easy for me to blend in and work together to make things happen. The truth is that the key ingredients when shooting a movie is the talent and relentless effort of the director. It was easy to work and hang around with some really cool people.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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The Role of the Youths in Nation-building in Nigeria

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Read Time:23 Minute, 9 Second

The Role of the Youths in Nation-building in Nigeria By Akintokunbo A Adejumo –Global Coordinator, Champions For Nigeria Organisation- Paper presented as a Guest Speaker at the Federation of Oyo State Students’ Union (Lagos State Chapter) Week- Held at the- Faculty of Education, University of Lagos, Akoka, Lagos, Nigeria 24th November 2010

I am very delighted to be invited, and be here, to deliver a Guest Speech at this Symposium put together by the FOSSU (Lagos State Chapter). And my delight should be understandable: for one thing, I am an indigene of Oyo State. For the other, today’s event is an opportunity for me to partake in the enduring and continuous concern of many Nigerians, old and young, with people-oriented issues over the years: nation-building or nation-destroying, unchecked corruption in high places, lapses in leadership at every level, promotion of democratic values and principles, care for the less-privileged, advocacy for good governance, exemplary public service, etc

“Nigeria is not a nation. It is a mere geographical expression. There are no ‘Nigerians’ in the same sense as there are ‘English’,  â€˜Welsh’ or ‘French.’ The word ‘Nigerian’ is merely a distinctive appellation to distinguish those who live within the boundaries of Nigeria and those who do not.” (Path to Nigerian Freedom by Chief Obafemi Awolowo)
We cannot talk of Nigerian politics without giving considerable weight on the role of civil society and corruption in the nation’s political development. As for ordinary Nigerians, they have grown inured to (which is not the same as being uncritical of) the prevalence of corruption. Surprise has gone out of news about huge embezzlement of state funds even if the shock remains. Today nobody can teach, talk or even think about Nigeria and its politics without at the same time taking into account the problem of corruption and the difficulties the civil society is facing. We have to assume that corruption inevitably contributes to the underdevelopment in Nigeria.
For the very fact that human motivation is a more complex business than any single explanation can account for, I inject a cautionary note on corruption as the basis for explaining the failure of nation-building and the inability to develop a viable civil society in Nigeria.
Nation-building refers to the process of constructing or structuring a national identity using the power of the state. This process aims at the unification of the people or peoples within the state so that it remains politically stable and viable in the long run. Nation-building can involve the use of propaganda or major infrastructure development to foster social harmony and economic growth (Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia)
Originally, nation-building referred to the efforts of newly-independent nations, notably the nations of Africa, to reshape colonial territories that had been carved out by colonial powers without regard to ethnic or other boundaries. These reformed states would then become viable and coherent national entities.
Nation-building included the creation of superficial national paraphernalia such as flags, anthems, national days, national stadiums, national airlines, national languages, and national myths. At a deeper level, national identity needed to be deliberately constructed by moulding different groups into a nation, especially since colonialism had used divide and rule tactics to maintain its domination.
However, many new states were plagued by “tribalism”, rivalry between ethnic groups within the nation. This sometimes resulted in their near-disintegration, such as the attempt by Biafra to secede from Nigeria in 1970, or the continuing demand of the Somali people in the Ogaden region of Ethiopia for complete independence.
To understand the notion of nation-building, one needs to have some definition of what a nation is. According to Carolyn Stephenson (2005), early conceptions of nation defined it as a group or race of people who shared history, traditions, and culture, sometimes religion, and usually language. Thus the United Kingdom comprises four nations, the English, Irish, Scottish, and Welsh. The people of a nation generally share a common national identity, and part of nation-building is the building of that common identity.
Today the word nation is often used synonymously with state, as in the United Nations. But a state is more properly the governmental apparatus by which a nation rules itself.
For the evolution of nation-building, Almond and Coleman (1960) defined input functions as:
1.      Political socialisation and recruitment.
2.      Interest articulation.
3.      Interest aggregation.
4.      Political communication.
Output functions were:
1.      Rule-making.
2.      Rule application.
3.      Rule adjudication
Lucian Pye identified multiple meanings of political development with, among them:
·         as prerequisite to economic development,
·         as politics typical of industrial societies,
·         as political modernization,
·         as administrative and legal development,
·         as mass mobilization and participation,
·         as the building of democracy, and
·         as stability and orderly change.
He identified equality as one of the basic themes running through all of these. While nation-building after 9/11 still incorporates many of these meanings of political development, equality does not seem to play a major role in practice.
Nation-building that will likely contribute to stable international peace will need to emphasize the democratic participation of people within the nation to demand rights. It will need to build the society, economy, and polity which will meet the basic needs of the people, so that they are not driven by poverty, inequality and unemployment, on the one hand, or by a desire to compete for resources and power either internally or in the international system. This does means not only producing the formal institutions of democracy, but the underlying culture which recognizes respect for the identities and needs of others both within and outside. It means development of human rights– political, civil, economic and social, and the rule of law. But it also means development of healthcare systems, and roads, and jobs. Perhaps most important, it means the development of education. Nation-building must allow the participation of civil society, and develop democratic state institutions that promote welfare. Democratic state-building is an important part of that. This is a multi-faceted process that will proceed differently in each local context.
Many commentators on Nigeria’s history and development are always fond of saying Nigeria that is, the country, is an artificial creation of a colonial power, Britain. Let us agree this is true. But is Nigeria the only artificial creation in Africa, or indeed the whole world? Many countries in the world as we have them today are artificial creations. Even the greatest country in the world, The United States of America was not created by God naturally. It was the ability of men of vision and wisdom and sufferings. Most African counties fall into this artificial creation phenomenon.
So, why is Nigeria deemed as unique?  Is it because we have 250 or so ethnic groups?  Is this an insurmountable problem, if indeed it is a problem?
So who builds a nation? Past notable examples of nation builders include Otto von Bismarck (the Iron Chancellor), who united Germany; Kemal Attaturk, who defeated the Ottoman Empire and founded and united present day Turkey. Even, there are the Kwame Nkrumahs, Leopold Senghors, Jomo Kenyattas, Julius Nyereres, Fidel Castros, Mahatma Ghandis of this world.  What can be done about nation-building is the question (if it should be done) or who should do it, and who CAN effectively do it. The literature is divided over these issues:
Individual statesmen and women: Where are they in Nigeria? Over the past 50 years, what we have seen are nation-destroyers, not nation-builders. We have been extremely unlucky with our leaders, as well as the followers, at any rate. So, the blame does not lie wholly on the type of leaders our society threw up.
In Nigeria, it has been very difficult to name even one of those people we love to refer to as our Founding Fathers (like the American Pilgrim Fathers) as nation building statesmen. It is really difficult, and this is simply because their mission then was not to build a nation but rather to build power bases and usurp power by whatever means; and mostly serving sectional or tribal interests, if not their pockets.
Intergovernmental organisations (IGOs), States or Nongovernmental organisations, (NGOs): Here, the issue is not so much which agency, but how the agency functions. Does it simply throw money at the problem? Does it exacerbate tensions by providing money or projects unevenly across ethnic groups or regions in such a way as to generate competition or, worse, security fears? Is its presence so big that it overwhelms the local or national governing structures it is trying to nurture? Is it culturally knowledgeable and sensitive?
Military or Civilian: The military must prepare leaders for nation building, by providing training in “culture; basic law and civics; city planning and public administration; economics; and ethics,” as well as language, and “how a free, democratic government is supposed to work”. Has this happened in Nigeria? The military incursion into government set Nigeria back a hundred years. They have no vision, no purpose, are largely opportunistic and corrupt, and hence had no idea what nation-building is. In fact, the military further polarised an already fractious Nigerians.
Thus, the civilians have not fared better either. Catch-22 situation, isn’t it? And unfortunately for us, it is same set of people, under a democratic dispensation, who are supposed to build the nation better, under peaceful, free and relaxed atmosphere, than under usually draconian military rules.
“The democratic approach to nation building refers to cases in which elected governments operate under inclusive institutions and the leaders behave in ways that strengthen democracy. This approach has the greatest potential for creating a stable multiethnic nation. Unfortunately, Nigerians have not yet successfully pursued this path” (Abu Bakarr, 2004)
Indigenous or exogenous actors: Nation-building is an evolutionary process. It takes a long time. One of the problems with outside actors is that they come and they go, but they are still necessary; arguing for the importance of indigenous nation-building does not mean that outside actors should ignore the process.
Role of youth in nation building/development: The saying goes that “youths are not only leaders of tomorrow, but partners of today” Maybe its time to start planting in them for tomorrow’s harvest. During this past US election, The Republicans underestimated the role of youth in politics, something the Democrats used to their advantage. The government and society at large have equal responsibility to provide the youth with an environment that is conducive to bringing about a mature and responsible youth population for the coming generation to lead a better life.
As nation builders, let us focus on brain drain of the thousands of graduates leaving the country for greener pastures. This issue of migration has a negative impact on our nation. Nations are build out of human intellect, migration of our many graduates has a serious implication on us. This means that a nation cannot be built without the recognition and the collective efforts of such graduates.
Particularly, my suggestions:
– be serious with your academic studies to be a better person tomorrow
– stop praising people with no genuine source of income
– do not encourage examination malpractices and cheating, expose perpetrators.
– ensure you register and vote in the 2011 Elections and collaborate and mobilize other youths to vote  
– use social media (Facebook, Twitter and other forums) and technology to encourage other youths to engage in the election process.

Barriers/Problems faced by the youths:
– High youth unemployment
– Lack of youth support by the government in the community
– Lack of fund to help the youths for school fees and social life

How to overcome the numerous problems in Nigeria:
– the youths must not sell their voting right for a bowl of soup or monetary gain
– the youths must not allow themselves to be used as thugs
– explore entrepreneurship as a way to develop yourself
– avoid secret societies and cultism in the university and our community
– protect your vote using simple technology at local polling station e.g. mobile phone and digital camera
– use social media to expose corrupt politicians with photo evidence
– engage in local and peaceful vigilant youth groups to help the election process e.g. election monitoring and evidence gathering locally

Fact: The present Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Cameron just turned 40, while Ed Milliband, the leader of the British opposition is about the same age.
Nigerians youths should therefore sit up and speak up.
Prof. Wole Soyinka is ageing; Gani Fawehinmi is late; and Femi Falana, Bamidele Aturu, Festus Keyamo, Olisa Agbakoba and a few others, need more youths to join them in leading Nigeria to the path of true nationalism, honour and development.

It is a shame that Ghana has left Nigeria behind while Nigerian youths are indulging themselves in campus cult and cultism, examination malpractices and prostitution rather than indulging in deep reflections and correct political praxis and positive student union activism.

The Nigerian student union, which ought to be a strong and active voice in the fight against corruption, has become comatose and complacent. Where are the likes of the past student union movements of late Banji Adegboro, Segun Okeowo, Chris Abashi, Labaran Maku and Arogundade? Where lies the bite of the present crop of Nigerian student leaders in particular and the youths in general? Where lies their sting? It is an unfortunate development! Very, very unfortunate.

At this critical point in our nation’s history, where blinding corruption, decadence and impunity are the order of the day, the student union is in a state of coma and moribund. I cannot really comprehend it!

Try and grab this stage in our history to express yourselves without fear or favour otherwise, yours too will be a wasted generation. Nigeria needs an active and a vibrant youth movement now than ever before. The future will not forgive them if they keep shying away from this utmost responsibility.

A key challenge, therefore, is the way we manage our affairs. The question for Nigerian youth is how to realize the principles outlined in the constitutions and thereby promote a stable multi-ethnic nation. Ehiedu Iweriebor (1990) identified six criteria for measuring the progress of the nation building process. These are: leadership, transportation and communication networks, economic development, national education, pedagogical nationalism, and civil society. Though his study outlines the successes and failures of the various Nigerian governments, it fails to explain why a particular type of government might fail or succeed in promoting nation building.
As stated in Article 14 of the 1979 Constitution: “The composition of the government of the federation or any of its agencies and the conduct of its affairs shall be carried out in such manner as to reflect the Federal Character of Nigeria and the need to promote national unity, and also to command national loyalty thereby ensuring that there shall be no predominance of persons from a few states or a few ethnic or other sectional groups in the government or in any of its agencies.” Furthermore, “the composition of the government of a state, a local government council, or any of the agencies of such government or council, and the conduct of the affairs of the government or council or such agencies shall be carried out in such manner as to recognize the diversity of the peoples within its area of authority and the need to promote a sense of belonging and loyalty among all the peoples of the federation.”
A democratic approach is the best path to nation building in a multi-ethnic country like Nigeria. As we have seen in the Nigerian experience with nation building, it is difficult to pursue a non-democratic means of reform without aggravating internal unrest and international censure. Sadly, the lack of a democratic mandate, poor institutional design, and bad leadership has all made it nearly impossible for successive Nigerian governments to pursue a democratic approach. Many Nigerians are not satisfied with the 1999 Constitution because it failed to address the structural imbalance of the federation (Abu Bakarr, 2004).
Even of more concern is the lack of accountability, the massive corruption scandals of successive governments, the poor state of the economy, and the fraud that characterized both the 2003 and 2007 elections. “If we continue to have these same levels of corruption and the economy is mismanaged, then the sustainability of democracy will be reduced. The country’s survival will be endangered.” (Suberu, 1999) Even though the emerging domestic and international political environment has minimized the possibility of a return to military rule, there is a real danger of democratic decay in Nigeria. As we have seen over the past decades, democratic decay is a recipe for chaos and military intervention.
All in all, I will posit, successful nation building is no mean task. The problem with our pseudo-leaders is that they have never taken nation-building, management of resources and people, leadership, seriously. In fact they do not know what it means to be leaders. They are essentially ignorant though educated (even this is questionable)
Nation-building and the associated developmental issues require men and women of deep vision; sincerity of purpose; selflessness; genuine love for their country and their people; hardworking; of conscience, integrity, credibility, trustworthiness, honesty, reliable and able; people who do not think of stealing or embezzling; people who do not misuse the authority and power conferred on them, by God or Man; people who do not think that getting to positions of authority is a “do-or-die” affair; people who understand the meaning of nation building, leadership, good governance, rule of law, political emancipation, equality, human and civic rights, civility, freedom of speech, rule of law, diversity and religious tolerance,; people who will shun and will not tolerate tribalism, corruption and nepotism.
These are the people who can build nations.
To my people, how are we building this nation? It is time for all Nigerians to collectively do their part in being nation builders and stop being nation destroyers.
Fact: Oyo State Experience –  Carved out of the old Western Region of late Chief Obafemi Awolowo; Ibadan, the military capital of the old Oyo Empire; the first regional capital of the old Western Region, the capital of old Western State (comprising the present Oyo, Osun, Ekiti, Ondo and  Ogun States); home to the first Television Station in the whole of Africa; home to the first sports stadium in West Africa; home to the first University and University College Hospital in Nigeria; a very cosmopolitan city, which welcomes everybody from anywhere in Nigeria and indeed the whole world. But now a sad excuse for a city, ruined beyond recognition, repairs and respect by greedy politicians and equally greedy and uncaring elites. The capital of Oyo State is a dilapidated, ruined, un-progressive town, not fit to be reckoned with as a city in Nigeria, even considering the sorry states of the rest of Nigerian cities and towns. Even the whole Oyo State is ruined by these useless, compromised people who are hampered by their greed, corruption and selfish ambition; men and women of straw who parade themselves as leaders and mini-gods; indulging in pettiness and ungodly and unholy alliances with mediocre and self-serving political charlatans and thugs. I really can’t find the proper words to express myself here. I have said it all before â€“ Why Oyo State Is Not Working and Cannot Work (Nigeria Village Square, Thurs 11 Oct 2007; Nigerians In America, 10 Dec 2007, Nigeria Today Online, Fri 12 Oct 2007) – and I do not want to reproduce myself here.
Fact: Our Democracy – One of the problems with our democracy is that people (s)elected into public office do not regard themselves as servants of the public who elected them and is paying their salaries. They regard governance as a right for them to do as they like with public money; with our lives. They regard the governed as their servants and slaves, and their states and boundaries as fiefdoms. The reason might be because we do not have a truly representative democracy where credible, free and fair elections are conducted. Most of these vagabonds in power (VIP) lied, rigged, murdered, raped and looted their way into positions of power; so what should we expect of a brigand and rogue to deliver when he/she becomes someone with authority?
Read the newly published Wale Adedayo’s book â€œMicro-seconds Away From Death” and you will understand how base, evil and depraved our so-called democratic rulers have descended. And for what? Money, power and recognition.
Look at the way our so-called leaders carry themselves in public. They are “mini-gods”. They are untouchables. They are the privileged. They have power of life and death and they constantly exercise it and remind us of their immortality. They forget, or perhaps, chose to ignore the fact that power, and indeed, life itself is transient.  And in so doing, they forget there is a greater Supreme Being than them. It is as if their tenure in power will never end.
In a way, I can’t blame them; it is an African thing, an African disease. Centuries of feudalism will be very difficult to replace with true western-style democracy. But we should still try. We must let them know we are living in the 21st Century and not in the Dark Ages, and we have examples we can emulate properly. We do not have to re-invent the wheel.
We can also jettison what will not work in Western-style democracy and our own African culture and tradition and ways of life and amalgamate the ones that can work to make our societies better. In order words, let’s fashion out what mode of government is best for us.
Are we going to survive? Your guess is as good as mine. Election 2011 will come and go, and Nigeria will remain. If we fail with that election, we will moan and shout, but the eternal optimists that we are, we shall be looking forward to a better election in 2015.
If we succeed with this election and we get the right person(s) (but with the current crop of disreputable and ignorant politicians and others of their ilk vying to become President, Governors and Local Government Chairmen, forget that optimism) then perhaps Nigeria would have come of democratic age. And perhaps there is a chance that the future of our children would be secured.
Finally, let me borrow the words of Gbola Bowale X (one of my Facebook friends) “We have a CHOICE in OUR GENERATION to either continue dealing with the SYMPTOMS of our multifarious and entrenched challenges or we can make a VERY BOLD attempt at dealing with the ROOT CAUSES of OUR COMMON CHALLENGES!  Until and unless we do what is NEEDFUL and not what is CONVENIENT; my folks, the wahala (problem) will continue to stare us in the face koro koro (forcefully) and we can continue to “blow” girama! (Grammar!).” 
And CHANGE.

There are old people you see on the streets right now, my young friends; their life is over, death is only a few machine pings away. Did THEY do something with their lives? Probably not, since you or I don’t know any of their names. Do you want to end up regretting what you didn’t do with your LIFE? NO! YOU DON’T! Hell, I’m only fifty-four and I’m ALREADY regretting a lot of stuff I didn’t do in my younger years.

You have power now, in your youth and future, that is glorious and precious; many people would give their souls to regain this power, even for a single day. This power is YOURS for many years… but sure as hell not foreverMAKE yourself grow in wisdom, awareness, and knowledge, both in self and the world; your confidence, abilities, and satisfaction will grow more and more every single day, and you will live a goddamned happy and useful life.

Let the Truth be said always.
“The glory of great men should always be measured by the means they have used to acquire it.” – Francois de La Rochefoucauld
Postscript: Professor Ibrahim Gambari, in 2006, said â€œToday, as a nation, we face more challenges than we have known hitherto.  Our population has ballooned from 55 million at independence to nearly 130 million.  Yet, in our country, children still go to bed hungry and most families subsist on less than one dollar a day.  It will, therefore, not be glib to state that in every household, community and state in this nation, where the top hierarchies of human needs are not being met, we certainly have a problem.  In a world awash with affluence, yet mired in poverty and hunger we cannot escape our culpability. This is more so in Nigeria, which once boasted of having agriculture as its primary industry.
Most Nigerians will readily admit that what affects us the most, is poverty and underdevelopment, which are now buffeted by perennial bad governance and debilitating corruption.  Likewise, those who are outside Nigeria looking in, will say the same thing, albeit, with a qualifier; to them Nigeria’s myriad of problems is self-induced.  This often the argument advanced by those who were opposed to any debt forgiveness for Nigeria.  They refuse to accept that a nation with so much wealth could be so indigent.  To them, our country and the challenges it faces, presents a unique paradox”.
Akintokunbo Adejumo was Pioneer & Past Publicity Secretary, Egbe Ifesemule ati Ilosiwaju Ede Yoruba – UK; Founding Member, Oluyole Progressive Union, UK & Ireland; Pioneer Member, Congress of Yoruba Heritage, Arts & Culture-UK; and is a Special Marshal of the  Federal Road Safety Commission, Oyo State Command. He’s also a Fellow of the Royal Life Saving Society of Nigeria.
He is a Food Safety & Hygiene Trainer and Consultant; and also an Associate Member of the Chartered Institute of Housing, UK and Member, Chartered Management Institute, UK.He is also the Country Director of the Nigerian-UK Housing Society and has also been appointed as the Academic Director of the proposed Afemai University, Fugar, Edo State.
Akintokunbo A AdejumoMSc, Dip Mngt, ACIH, MCMI
www.affinitylibra.com.ng
www.championsfornigeria.org
www.babatoks.com

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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The Betrayal of Africa, by Gerald Caplan,

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Read Time:4 Minute, 17 Second

It is such a small book for such a large continent with such huge issues, but this is no superficial primer for neophyte travellers and liberal do-gooders.

Caplan has been around Africa for, as he writes, more than 40 years, He knows it well and passionately cares for its future. His analysis is spot-on, although it will rub some the wrong way. He does not gloss over the causes of the indignities that hundreds of millions of Africans suffer at the hands of their political and economic masters. Nor does he gloss over the role of outsiders who ensure that “more wealth pours out of Africa to the West than the West transfers to Africa.”

Of course, some things are missing. Africaphiles and academics will want more detail, more studies. The “development” industry will find The Betrayal of Africa scathing in its analysis of the failure of its many programs and projects. Many African leaders and the political elites will feel denuded as Caplan focuses a searing eye on their corruption and ineptitude. The book ignores much of North Africa which Caplan sees as “qualitatively different” from the countries south of the Sahara. Instead – and correctly – the book focuses on the 48 existing nation states of sub-Saharan Africa with its 800, or more, million people, consisting of several thousand ethnic groups and more than 2,000 languages in addition to the “official” English, French and Portuguese of  the colonizers.

The book’s analysis avoids the trap which many experts fall into of treating Africa as a single entity. It is far too complex and diverse for that imperialist and racist view despite the similar predicaments that many countries find themselves in. “Even the uninformed outsider in the rich world is [at least superficially] aware of the African condition: underdevelopment, violent conflict, famine, AIDS, wretched governance.”   Caplan and his publishers have produced a book that is popularly writtten in style, designed with tables and  maps that illustrate superbly the basic context that history does count, that Africa was invaded and conquered about 120 years ago when “European leaders who knew nothing about Africa and cared less, exacerbated [those] natural challenges when their arbitrary division of the continent created 15 landlocked entities.”

The Betrayal of Africa nicely explodes stereotypes that are still used today to justify economic and political  exploitation: glamorizing rural life where 70 percent of Africa’s poor live; ignoring the reality of the underdevelopment of women who have no rights at all despite egalitarian protocols and the number of powerful women in most countries; and the unhealthy disasters of largely preventable diseases that claim 130,000 lives-a-week from AIDS, malaria, TB, unsafe water, respiratory disease and so on.

One of the most controversial – but to my mind wholly accurate – allegations Caplan makes is entitled “the great conspiracy”; but this analysis is no theory. Caplan calls it a “cynical little deal” where  African leaders “pretend” to reform themselves and Western aid and development agencies “pretend” to live up to their promises of help and support..

One could wish that Caplan would explore more deeply the failure of democratic capitalism in poor countries for the same reason it fails the poor, homeless and immigrant populations of Canada and the U.S.

As always, the liberals want hope. Is there any hope for Africa, despite its enormous natural wealth?. Caplan identifies, as do many African analysts, the four major geographical potential power points in the east (Ethiopia), west (Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of the Congo), and south (South Africa). But each has almost insurmountable problems, leaving only South Africa as “the single greatest hope” for the continent.

Some hope, for the last country in the continent to gain independence (1994) with its own deep-seated, and increasingly evident, structural difficulties.

And where do we fit into all this? Not by insisting Africa use the World Trade Organization as a tool of the very richest against the very poorest.

“The truth is not in doubt. It takes little imagination to look at Africa and see a portrait of unparalled hopelessness. It’s easy to be overwhelmed by despair and a sense of futility.”

That’s exactly why the causes of for this condition need to be properly analysed and understood by the West in reversing the situation. Dishonesty and rationalization only makes the crisis worse. For those in the West long committed to Africa, recognizing our complicity is a crucial step towards that reversal.

The Betrayal of Africa, by Gerald Caplan,

Groundwood Books,
House of Anansi,
Toronto, 2008, 144pp.

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this article are those of the writer(s) and not do necessarily reflect the views of the Codewit World news’ editors and network members. They are included in our material as a reflection of a diversity of views and a variety of issues. Material written specifically for Codewit.com may be edited for length, clarity or inaccuracies.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Co-conspirators:: WASHINGTON D.C. AND TEL AVIV -AMERICA’S WORST ENEMIES

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Read Time:2 Minute, 59 Second

Weaponized Caterpillar D9 bulldozers,  suspend deliveries, to Israel.  Israel will receive 20 F-35 stealth fighters instead  in exchange for extending a meaningless three-month settlement moratorium.  These fighter jets are far more sophisticated than what the Israeli military needs to continue killing Palestinians, as they’ve repeatedly done recently in Gaza.  Palestinians have no air defenses, nor air force, so worry that these fighters are intended to kill regionally. That along with the 300 nuclear war heads,  the atrocities committed on their neighbors so far dwarves what is coming in the near future.  Simply amazing how some GOD gives direction to American presidents, but
no one else.  How ever there is a bunch of self anointed disciples ready to sanction any renegade claiming  such.

WE HAVE STOOD WITH PRESIDENT OBAMA, NOW HE NEEDS TO STAND WITH US ..Don’t count on it, we were Deceived over & over again.

The very foundations of the U.S. economy have rotted away and we now find ourselves on the verge of an economic collapse.  Already, millions upon millions of Americans are slipping out of the middle class and into the devastating grip of poverty.  Statistic after statistic proves that the middle class in the United States is shrinking month after month after month.

Tent Cities, Homelessness And Soul-Crushing Despair: The Legacy Of Decades Of Government Debt And Mismanagement Of The Economy
12 Facts That Will Blow Your Mind – Federal Employees And Members Of Congress Are Getting Rich While Those Of Us Who Pay Their Salaries Suffer

OUR veterans suffer after tour upon tour for wars they never should have fought. Pre-emption for foreign reasoning.

Republicans proclaim that we are experiencing all of this economic chaos because of the Democrats.
Democrats proclaim that we are experiencing all of this economic chaos because of the Republicans.

We find that members of both parties have raped the resources and wealth of the American people for special interest,  by corruption and

unreasonable support for a rogue state and organized crime syndicate. Such treason has destroyed our democracy and turning our

form of government more and more toward fascism.

Threw thick and thin we have stood with President Obama, NOW is the time for the President  to stand with the people voting him into office,

not the foreign lobbies, foreign policies of the past, or fighting the wars they bring unto themselves.

The issues are not to take back our Country from one political party or another. It is a fact, we need to take back our government and

Country from foreign interest, their syndicate, their lobbies, their atrocities, and the religious  misconceptions of 2000 yrs ago.

By the way folks, Washington staffers report to lobbies such as AIPAC, J-Street, and others prior to if at all, to your representative.

While AIPAC celebrates victory in recent congressional elections, and people like Congressman Eric Cantor volunteer to “get their back,” it is clear that violence-prone supporters of Israel are worried about a growing nonviolent international movement standing in their way.
We recognize that our opponents have more money than we do.  We know they are politically stronger than we are, and intent on continuous expansion of Israeli settlements and greater and greater oppression of the Palestinian population. Globalization means you also my friends.

poverty rate in America 18-20%—Highest rate in 25 yrs.
poverty rate in Israel 20-25% and climbing.

Yet the War profits, and corruption has yielded the
top 2% (The elites) historic profits.

www.ronaldlwaldron.com

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Anxiety of Nigeria’s losing giant

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Read Time:9 Minute, 3 Second

Almost a year after its inaugural sitting in Osogbo, Justices of the Court of Appeal in Ibadan, led by Clara Ogunbiyi, on Friday declared candidate of the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN), Rauf Aregbesola, winner of the 2007 governorship election in Osun State. The judgment brought to an end the Peoples Democratic Party government headed by Olagunsoye Oyinlola which had only a few months to the end of its tenure. The Osun trial will go down in the annals of election petitions in Nigeria as one of the most spectacular, but more significant is the fact that the verdict came in a season replete with legal upsets for the ruling PDP, and the ruling party’s fears about losing the South West in 2011 became more intense.

Aregbesola and his supporters went through perhaps the toughest circumstances of their time, and the acceptance speech delivered by the victorious Aregbesola after the judgement reflected the optimism which the legal triumph brought to the ACN in the South West.

He said: “Today is a day to treasure. Today is a day to toast. Today is a day to celebrate.  Again, I congratulate you, the doughty and courageous people of our land!  But I also congratulate the brave Judiciary for the umpteenth time, undoing the deliberate evil Maurice Iwu-led Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) has done.  I thank the Judiciary for doing a most patriotic duty of energizing our democracy by making our votes count, thus returning sovereignty to the people. This no doubt has mitigated the possible import of the General Olusegun Obasanjo motivated do-or-die politics.

“However, the big lesson the nation has to learn from the brazen licentiousness and untoward tendencies that were brought to taint the conduct of the affairs of the nation is the imperative for electoral reforms.  The needless pains and terror visited on the Osun state people in the last 42 months and the threat to the collective integrity of the judiciary could have been averted had the Nigeria electoral system been attuned to the realities of our time and made to protect its own sanctity.

“The debilitating lacuna of “substantial compliance” in the Electoral Act 2006 has been stretched to its unholy limits thus providing safe haven for willing judicial collaborators. This obnoxious clause must go. Our recent experience has also shown that it has been easy for political gangsters to rape the electoral process because of the lax timing of the voting arrangements. If Nigeria is serious about checkmating ballot snatching, multiple voting, ballot stuffing and other forms of electoral malpractices, we must revert to the Open Secret Ballot system of 1993 whereby there would be synchronised simultaneous accreditation for all intending voters across all constituencies. Voting should commence and end simultaneously across all voting constituencies, counting done and results announced at the polling units. The results should be recorded both in manual and electronic format.”

There had been palpable anxiety in the air long before the judgement which became complicated with the recent sour experience of the PDP from similar courts in neighbouring states. In Ekiti State, the Court of Appeal sitting in Ilorin had sacked the former occupant of the Government House, Segun Oni, and declared Kayode Fayemi of the ACN as the state governor.

While struggling to recover from the shock that characterised the loss of the state to the opposition, another blow was dealt the PDP in by the Court of Appeal sitting in Benin, Edo State which nullified the election of the former occupant of the Delta State Government House, Emmanuel Uduaghan, and ordered that fresh governorship election be conducted in the state within 90 days.

President Goodluck Jonathan and the National Chairman of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), Okwesilieze Nwodo, had openly expressed anxiety about the declining fortunes of the party. Reports had it that soon after Oni’s sack in Ekiti, Jonathan and Nwodo met to review the fate that had befallen the party. They were said to be particularly worried over the Osun governorship tussle which was still pending at the Appeal Court.

According to reports, Jonathan was said to have complained bitterly to Nwodo that should the trend continue, it may be a Herculean task to post good results in the South-West, which was the first to openly endorse Jonathan’s presidential bid for 2011.

Just days before the Osun verdict, Ogun State Governor, Gbenga Daniel, warned of the collapse of the PDP in the South-West. Speaking at the second stakeholders meeting and inauguration of Coordinators of the Goodluck Jonathan Presidential Campaign, held at his Aseludero Private Residence in Sagamu, Daniel pleaded with the PDP leadership to put its house in order.

“We must tell ourselves the truth, we have not managed our victory well; the capacity of our party to manage crisis is nil,” he was quoted as saying. The governor, who is the South-West Coordinator for the campaign team, linked the fear of winning next elections to the loss of Ondo and Ekiti states to the opposition.

Regretting the removal of Segun Oni by the court, Daniel declared: “The worst came recently when we legally lost Ekiti. What happened in Ekiti State is a shame for all of us, nobody expected it.” Thereafter he announced that in respect of Osun State, “what I am hearing is scary.”

The governor admitted that the party had challenges and hurdles to cross to win impressively in the forthcoming elections, saying, “we must not take things for granted; what we have on our hands is major; if we again lose Osun, PDP is gone; if we are not careful, that may be the end of our party.” He then appealed to all stakeholders to take a second look at the problems of the party in the region and find ways of resolving internal wrangling.

In a similar disposition, the PDP National Chairman, Okwesilieze Nwodo, insisted that the South West must remain in mainstream politics in the country, saying that the zone had much to gain by remaining in the mainstream politics through the PDP.

In a statement by his Special Assistant on Media, Ike Abonyi, Nwodo described the ACN as the winner of the 2007 gubernatorial election in Ekiti State as a temporary set-back, and urged PDP members to present popular candidates to ensure victory for the party in 2011 and beyond.

According to him, the South West, like every other zone, was very strategic to the party and every effort must be put in place by all to sustain it, adding that the party would reclaim Ekiti in subsequent elections.

Nwodo urged party members in the zone to unite and sustain the true position of the party in the region, and warned that “only harmony and spirit of accommodation in the party can help them realise the dream and aspiration of numerous party members.” The chairman advised the PDP leaders to play an inclusive politics and give members a sense of belonging.

What later became the most memorable part of Nwodo’s address was his claim that the ACN used forged documents to win the Ekiti Governorship election in the Appeal Court on October 15.

This view drew the ire of the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN) which soon reacted with scorn the following day.

Lagos ACN Publicity Secretary, Joe Igbokwe, said Nwodo was a shameless political turn coat who sees relevance as spewing tones of nonsense to please his masters.

“Nwodo knows he is acting like a hopeless lifeline for Osun and indeed the South West PDP in his wild hallucination of a PDP take-over of the South West when the party is being sent packing after fraudulently stealing its way to power in 2003,” Igbokwe said in a statement.

Continuing, he said: “Nwodo knows that the PDP is a dying and an unproductive cult, not only in the South West but the entire country and he feels he must sound reassuring to the members of the party but in a most awkward and specious way. We urge Nwodo and his ilk to wait for their deserved rustication from the badly messed Nigerian politics for that offers the hope for Nigeria’s redemption from the colony of locusts, which Nwodo heads and which forces him to make reckless and wild statements in the hope that he would remain relevant in Nigeria’s politics and so further his selfish interests. We are not in doubt that Nwodo’s politics is ruled by the highest degree of selfishness and that is why he will, in his desperation to restore hope to his withering members in the South West, make a reckless and fictitious allegation on a fact most Nigerians are very much conversant with.”

ACN National Publicity Secretary, Lai Mohammed, added that his own sting and pointed out that Nwodo’s claim was a direct attack on the integrity of the judiciary and yet another indication that the PDP was a bad loser.

His words: “Nwodo is not alone in this campaign. It is obviously a well-coordinated and multi-faceted strategy by the PDP. After all, Governor Olagunsoye Oyinlola of Osun State has suddenly realised that President Goodluck Jonathan and his Deputy are the candidates of the party in the South West, apparently in an effort to cajole the President to intervene on his behalf on the Osun case. Just like we had reason to warn against anyone, no matter how highly placed, to desist from seeking to influence the judgement of the Court of Appeal on Ekiti, we will like to warn here that no one should attempt to interfere with the Osun judgement as any such attempt will fail. Let justice be done, no matter whose ox is gored.”

Mohammed said Nwodo’s “careless statement” in the Ekiti matter was a crude attempt at intimidating the judiciary ahead of the judgement of the Court of Appeal on the Osun Governorship election petition.

“This is not just about Ekiti, but about Osun State, and we know it,” Mohammed said, wondering why the PDP would think every party is like it in terms of using foul and fraudulent means to achieve electoral victory.

The PDP now has only Oyo State in its kitty in the ‘wild wild west’ and given the present tenor of politics in that state, the PDP may not be able to hold on to it in 2011 if it fields the incumbent, going by political analyses. The implication of this for whoever wins the PDP presidential primary between Jonathan or Atiku Abubakar could be more scary than the ‘biggest party in Africa’ has yet admitted.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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