Our gods must be dead: A close look at Religion in Nigeria

0 0
Read Time:6 Minute, 17 Second

The Southern tribe of Nigeria believes in a supreme God and worship him in many different ways; they have different gods, demi-gods, and goddesses. They have ogun, osun, sango, oya, ifa, obatala and many others. These gods are believed to take their requests and prayers to Olodumare (the supreme God). Every different family have the religion their four-fathers were attached to and these beliefs were passed from one generation to the other. The other regions of Nigeria have similar gods and their various practices. Christianity and Islamic religions were introduced to Nigeria by foreign missionaries; it heralded a new dimension to our already saturated trado-religious societies. The two religions were widely accepted as the needed unification of our several traditional religions.

Our elders reason that doing away with the old traditional religions and embracing the new imported ones will bring better understanding of the supreme God and lead to stronger cohesion among all. This is a sure way of getting rid of our very primitive ways of worshipping God, which often involves shedding of blood and other fetish practices. This new way of worship is foreign and it is in our nature to accept and embrace anything foreign, these tend to work at the time and everyone was happy. The new religions when compared to our long held religions is modern, imported and fashionable with new signs, approaches, dress style, new way of reasoning and several imported books and instruments. The new religions tend to work for a few years, especially when it was administered by the white missioners and evangelists. It took a few years for us to get grip with the books of law that comes with the two religions. The Christian book is the Bible and the Quran for the Muslims. Most of Africans were not able to read the books at the time; they struggled to understand and digest the books and can only listen to its interpretation from the missioners. The white missioners were very modest, humble, very pleasant and not driven by money. Things have changed now, almost every one can read and write, so we tend to give those books of law our own direct interpretation as it relates to our societies and ways of life. The two accepted religions; Christianity and Islam now seem to be splitting us apart rather than the initial aim of bringing us together. The fire of the differences is now fully ignited, intensely burning and coming closer to us daily. The massive unrest and killing in the north and other parts of Nigeria, says a lot about the void we have created for ourselves. We now see ourselves as enemies because of the differences in the religious beliefs and more lives are cut short daily. The reason we have abandoned our old religion was to avoid bloodshed, but the Jihadist says they have been ordered by God to kill for people to accept God at all cost. These indicate we have only left our old gods for the foreign one to cause more death for us. Our old traditional beliefs now look better packaged and organised than this imported killing-machines. Our young lads are trained to be suicide bombers and killers, which has never been our way of life. To make it worse, we are all so much attached to the religions that we are blinded to see the realities all around us. The new age religious leaders are so full of greed, selfishness and confusion. We can see the confusion in all the different worship centres and churches; from Anglican to Pentecostal, Catholic to Presbyterian, Jehovah Witnesses to Methodist, white garment churches to Orthodox.

They all preach and practice different things, read different types of Bibles and worship same God following different and confusing ways. Same is applicable among the different Islamic centres. Each of the churches you find yourself has something negative to say about the one opposite. Visit a couple of them and you will be more confused than navigating the Sahara desert; they all preach different things and worship same God in different confusing ways. Things have gone really bad that the members of these churches have completely abandoned there ways of life, values, culture and integrity, for the worship centres to grow and make the priests richer. Nigerians currently obey and fear their pastors more than their God and are easily deceived to obey those laws the pastors’ way. They now commit their hard earned money to pastors, leaving the pastors to live large, riding the most expensive cars, buying jets and living in mansions among the richest. The followers who are in their poverty stricken state still bring their widows might to the church, expecting multiplications, believing the churches are money doubling scheme. Our creativity, research, ideas and development is completely eroded because of the inspirational sermons from the religious houses, leaving the people with the impression that God will do everything for them. We are now developing a lazy society where everyone is putting their investment into the churches in exchange for a bright and successful future.

This is helping to increase the church treasury, enjoyed by the priests and the officials of the church, while leaving the church members to continue in their self-pity. Many new age priests in the various churches place their member on daily curses for not having their tithe and offering to give and this leads to more Nigerians going all out to get money through any means to impress the priests and keep their front seat positions in the church. The money we pump to these priests can be used for the development of our local societies and would make us better and richer. The church practices a lot of inconceivable schemes to get money off its members, who are out looking for supernatural rewards. We all encourage our leaders to steal from us, if our religious houses is stinking, what more can you say of the politicians. Our pastors steal and leave more glamorous lives than even the politicians in the name of the Lord, but because they are men of God, we must not judge. The stealing politicians are the best friends of the religious leaders, some of them visit praying mountains to fast and pray for these politicians to steal more money to bless their church.

This evil and corrupt scheme is continuous, while the poor who constitute the largest population of Nigerians continue to languish in their abject poverty. The latest trend and worst for the economy is that these churches are buying off businesses and their premises and converting those to churches, forcing business owners to happily close business and throw their staff to the labour market and some to the crime market in the name of the Lord. The heartache we are putting ourselves through is too much. What with the brainless Jihadist -illiterates trying to kill everyone to get them saved, how worse can it get? Our gods must be dead. Join CP-Africa on Google +! gplus.to/cpafrica Share149 Abiola Olaifa is a UK based writer with the passion for projecting reforms in Africa through his writings. Abiola has a background in Computer Science, but enjoys writing. He is an Author with a published book titled ‘Defy All Odds’ available in all major online and book stores. Abiola is also a bloggist with his blog address; www.abiolla.com and have a strong believe in Africa working. You can reach him at abiolla@gmail.com.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Our gods must be dead: A close look at Religion in Nigeria

0 0
Read Time:6 Minute, 17 Second

The Southern tribe of Nigeria believes in a supreme God and worship him in many different ways; they have different gods, demi-gods, and goddesses. They have ogun, osun, sango, oya, ifa, obatala and many others. These gods are believed to take their requests and prayers to Olodumare (the supreme God). Every different family have the religion their four-fathers were attached to and these beliefs were passed from one generation to the other. The other regions of Nigeria have similar gods and their various practices. Christianity and Islamic religions were introduced to Nigeria by foreign missionaries; it heralded a new dimension to our already saturated trado-religious societies. The two religions were widely accepted as the needed unification of our several traditional religions.

Our elders reason that doing away with the old traditional religions and embracing the new imported ones will bring better understanding of the supreme God and lead to stronger cohesion among all. This is a sure way of getting rid of our very primitive ways of worshipping God, which often involves shedding of blood and other fetish practices. This new way of worship is foreign and it is in our nature to accept and embrace anything foreign, these tend to work at the time and everyone was happy. The new religions when compared to our long held religions is modern, imported and fashionable with new signs, approaches, dress style, new way of reasoning and several imported books and instruments. The new religions tend to work for a few years, especially when it was administered by the white missioners and evangelists. It took a few years for us to get grip with the books of law that comes with the two religions. The Christian book is the Bible and the Quran for the Muslims. Most of Africans were not able to read the books at the time; they struggled to understand and digest the books and can only listen to its interpretation from the missioners. The white missioners were very modest, humble, very pleasant and not driven by money. Things have changed now, almost every one can read and write, so we tend to give those books of law our own direct interpretation as it relates to our societies and ways of life. The two accepted religions; Christianity and Islam now seem to be splitting us apart rather than the initial aim of bringing us together. The fire of the differences is now fully ignited, intensely burning and coming closer to us daily. The massive unrest and killing in the north and other parts of Nigeria, says a lot about the void we have created for ourselves. We now see ourselves as enemies because of the differences in the religious beliefs and more lives are cut short daily. The reason we have abandoned our old religion was to avoid bloodshed, but the Jihadist says they have been ordered by God to kill for people to accept God at all cost. These indicate we have only left our old gods for the foreign one to cause more death for us. Our old traditional beliefs now look better packaged and organised than this imported killing-machines. Our young lads are trained to be suicide bombers and killers, which has never been our way of life. To make it worse, we are all so much attached to the religions that we are blinded to see the realities all around us. The new age religious leaders are so full of greed, selfishness and confusion. We can see the confusion in all the different worship centres and churches; from Anglican to Pentecostal, Catholic to Presbyterian, Jehovah Witnesses to Methodist, white garment churches to Orthodox.

They all preach and practice different things, read different types of Bibles and worship same God following different and confusing ways. Same is applicable among the different Islamic centres. Each of the churches you find yourself has something negative to say about the one opposite. Visit a couple of them and you will be more confused than navigating the Sahara desert; they all preach different things and worship same God in different confusing ways. Things have gone really bad that the members of these churches have completely abandoned there ways of life, values, culture and integrity, for the worship centres to grow and make the priests richer. Nigerians currently obey and fear their pastors more than their God and are easily deceived to obey those laws the pastors’ way. They now commit their hard earned money to pastors, leaving the pastors to live large, riding the most expensive cars, buying jets and living in mansions among the richest. The followers who are in their poverty stricken state still bring their widows might to the church, expecting multiplications, believing the churches are money doubling scheme. Our creativity, research, ideas and development is completely eroded because of the inspirational sermons from the religious houses, leaving the people with the impression that God will do everything for them. We are now developing a lazy society where everyone is putting their investment into the churches in exchange for a bright and successful future.

This is helping to increase the church treasury, enjoyed by the priests and the officials of the church, while leaving the church members to continue in their self-pity. Many new age priests in the various churches place their member on daily curses for not having their tithe and offering to give and this leads to more Nigerians going all out to get money through any means to impress the priests and keep their front seat positions in the church. The money we pump to these priests can be used for the development of our local societies and would make us better and richer. The church practices a lot of inconceivable schemes to get money off its members, who are out looking for supernatural rewards. We all encourage our leaders to steal from us, if our religious houses is stinking, what more can you say of the politicians. Our pastors steal and leave more glamorous lives than even the politicians in the name of the Lord, but because they are men of God, we must not judge. The stealing politicians are the best friends of the religious leaders, some of them visit praying mountains to fast and pray for these politicians to steal more money to bless their church.

This evil and corrupt scheme is continuous, while the poor who constitute the largest population of Nigerians continue to languish in their abject poverty. The latest trend and worst for the economy is that these churches are buying off businesses and their premises and converting those to churches, forcing business owners to happily close business and throw their staff to the labour market and some to the crime market in the name of the Lord. The heartache we are putting ourselves through is too much. What with the brainless Jihadist -illiterates trying to kill everyone to get them saved, how worse can it get? Our gods must be dead. Join CP-Africa on Google +! gplus.to/cpafrica Share149 Abiola Olaifa is a UK based writer with the passion for projecting reforms in Africa through his writings. Abiola has a background in Computer Science, but enjoys writing. He is an Author with a published book titled ‘Defy All Odds’ available in all major online and book stores. Abiola is also a bloggist with his blog address; www.abiolla.com and have a strong believe in Africa working. You can reach him at abiolla@gmail.com.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

What Americans Keep Ignoring About Finland’s School Success

0 0
Read Time:11 Minute, 15 Second

The Scandinavian country is an education superpower because it values equality more than excellence. Everyone agrees the United States needs to improve its education system dramatically, but how? One of the hottest trends in education reform lately is looking at the stunning success of the West’s reigning education superpower, Finland. Trouble is, when it comes to the lessons that Finnish schools have to offer, most of the discussion seems to be missing the point.

The small Nordic country of Finland used to be known — if it was known for anything at all — as the home of Nokia, the mobile phone giant. But lately Finland has been attracting attention on global surveys of quality of life — Newsweek ranked it number one last year — and Finland’s national education system has been receiving particular praise, because in recent years Finnish students have been turning in some of the highest test scores in the world.

Finland’s schools owe their newfound fame primarily to one study: the PISA survey, conducted every three years by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The survey compares 15-year-olds in different countries in reading, math, and science. Finland has ranked at or near the top in all three competencies on every survey since 2000, neck and neck with superachievers such as South Korea and Singapore. In the most recent survey in 2009 Finland slipped slightly, with students in Shanghai, China, taking the best scores, but the Finns are still near the very top. Throughout the same period, the PISA performance of the United States has been middling, at best.

Compared with the stereotype of the East Asian model — long hours of exhaustive cramming and rote memorization — Finland’s success is especially intriguing because Finnish schools assign less homework and engage children in more creative play. All this has led to a continuous stream of foreign delegations making the pilgrimage to Finland to visit schools and talk with the nation’s education experts, and constant coverage in the worldwide media marveling at the Finnish miracle.

So there was considerable interest in a recent visit to the U.S. by one of the leading Finnish authorities on education reform, Pasi Sahlberg, director of the Finnish Ministry of Education’s Center for International Mobility and author of the new book Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn from Educational Change in Finland? Earlier this month, Sahlberg stopped by the Dwight School in New York City to speak with educators and students, and his visit received national media attention and generated much discussion.

And yet it wasn’t clear that Sahlberg’s message was actually getting through. As Sahlberg put it to me later, there are certain things nobody in America really wants to talk about.

* * *

During the afternoon that Sahlberg spent at the Dwight School, a photographer from the New York Times jockeyed for position with Dan Rather’s TV crew as Sahlberg participated in a roundtable chat with students. The subsequent article in the Times about the event would focus on Finland as an “intriguing school-reform model.”

Yet one of the most significant things Sahlberg said passed practically unnoticed. “Oh,” he mentioned at one point, “and there are no private schools in Finland.”

This notion may seem difficult for an American to digest, but it’s true. Only a small number of independent schools exist in Finland, and even they are all publicly financed. None is allowed to charge tuition fees. There are no private universities, either. This means that practically every person in Finland attends public school, whether for pre-K or a Ph.D.

The irony of Sahlberg’s making this comment during a talk at the Dwight School seemed obvious. Like many of America’s best schools, Dwight is a private institution that costs high-school students upward of $35,000 a year to attend — not to mention that Dwight, in particular, is run for profit, an increasing trend in the U.S. Yet no one in the room commented on Sahlberg’s statement. I found this surprising. Sahlberg himself did not.

Sahlberg knows what Americans like to talk about when it comes to education, because he’s become their go-to guy in Finland. The son of two teachers, he grew up in a Finnish school. He taught mathematics and physics in a junior high school in Helsinki, worked his way through a variety of positions in the Finnish Ministry of Education, and spent years as an education expert at the OECD, the World Bank, and other international organizations.

Now, in addition to his other duties, Sahlberg hosts about a hundred visits a year by foreign educators, including many Americans, who want to know the secret of Finland’s success. Sahlberg’s new book is partly an attempt to help answer the questions he always gets asked.

From his point of view, Americans are consistently obsessed with certain questions: How can you keep track of students’ performance if you don’t test them constantly? How can you improve teaching if you have no accountability for bad teachers or merit pay for good teachers? How do you foster competition and engage the private sector? How do you provide school choice?

The answers Finland provides seem to run counter to just about everything America’s school reformers are trying to do.

For starters, Finland has no standardized tests. The only exception is what’s called the National Matriculation Exam, which everyone takes at the end of a voluntary upper-secondary school, roughly the equivalent of American high school.

Instead, the public school system’s teachers are trained to assess children in classrooms using independent tests they create themselves. All children receive a report card at the end of each semester, but these reports are based on individualized grading by each teacher. Periodically, the Ministry of Education tracks national progress by testing a few sample groups across a range of different schools.

As for accountability of teachers and administrators, Sahlberg shrugs. “There’s no word for accountability in Finnish,” he later told an audience at the Teachers College of Columbia University. “Accountability is something that is left when responsibility has been subtracted.”

For Sahlberg what matters is that in Finland all teachers and administrators are given prestige, decent pay, and a lot of responsibility. A master’s degree is required to enter the profession, and teacher training programs are among the most selective professional schools in the country. If a teacher is bad, it is the principal’s responsibility to notice and deal with it.

And while Americans love to talk about competition, Sahlberg points out that nothing makes Finns more uncomfortable. In his book Sahlberg quotes a line from Finnish writer named Samuli Puronen: “Real winners do not compete.” It’s hard to think of a more un-American idea, but when it comes to education, Finland’s success shows that the Finnish attitude might have merits. There are no lists of best schools or teachers in Finland. The main driver of education policy is not competition between teachers and between schools, but cooperation.

Finally, in Finland, school choice is noticeably not a priority, nor is engaging the private sector at all. Which brings us back to the silence after Sahlberg’s comment at the Dwight School that schools like Dwight don’t exist in Finland.

“Here in America,” Sahlberg said at the Teachers College, “parents can choose to take their kids to private schools. It’s the same idea of a marketplace that applies to, say, shops. Schools are a shop and parents can buy what ever they want. In Finland parents can also choose. But the options are all the same.”

Herein lay the real shocker. As Sahlberg continued, his core message emerged, whether or not anyone in his American audience heard it.

Decades ago, when the Finnish school system was badly in need of reform, the goal of the program that Finland instituted, resulting in so much success today, was never excellence. It was equity.

* * *

Since the 1980s, the main driver of Finnish education policy has been the idea that every child should have exactly the same opportunity to learn, regardless of family background, income, or geographic location. Education has been seen first and foremost not as a way to produce star performers, but as an instrument to even out social inequality.

In the Finnish view, as Sahlberg describes it, this means that schools should be healthy, safe environments for children. This starts with the basics. Finland offers all pupils free school meals, easy access to health care, psychological counseling, and individualized student guidance.

In fact, since academic excellence wasn’t a particular priority on the Finnish to-do list, when Finland’s students scored so high on the first PISA survey in 2001, many Finns thought the results must be a mistake. But subsequent PISA tests confirmed that Finland — unlike, say, very similar countries such as Norway — was producing academic excellence through its particular policy focus on equity.

That this point is almost always ignored or brushed aside in the U.S. seems especially poignant at the moment, after the financial crisis and Occupy Wall Street movement have brought the problems of inequality in America into such sharp focus. The chasm between those who can afford $35,000 in tuition per child per year — or even just the price of a house in a good public school district — and the other “99 percent” is painfully plain to see.

* * *

Pasi Sahlberg goes out of his way to emphasize that his book Finnish Lessons is not meant as a how-to guide for fixing the education systems of other countries. All countries are different, and as many Americans point out, Finland is a small nation with a much more homogeneous population than the United States. 

Yet Sahlberg doesn’t think that questions of size or homogeneity should give Americans reason to dismiss the Finnish example. Finland is a relatively homogeneous country — as of 2010, just 4.6 percent of Finnish residents had been born in another country, compared with 12.7 percent in the United States. But the number of foreign-born residents in Finland doubled during the decade leading up to 2010, and the country didn’t lose its edge in education. Immigrants tended to concentrate in certain areas, causing some schools to become much more mixed than others, yet there has not been much change in the remarkable lack of variation between Finnish schools in the PISA surveys across the same period.

Samuel Abrams, a visiting scholar at Columbia University’s Teachers College, has addressed the effects of size and homogeneity on a nation’s education performance by comparing Finland with another Nordic country: Norway. Like Finland, Norway is small and not especially diverse overall, but unlike Finland it has taken an approach to education that is more American than Finnish. The result? Mediocre performance in the PISA survey. Educational policy, Abrams suggests, is probably more important to the success of a country’s school system than the nation’s size or ethnic makeup.

Indeed, Finland’s population of 5.4 million can be compared to many an American state — after all, most American education is managed at the state level. According to the Migration Policy Institute, a research organization in Washington, there were 18 states in the U.S. in 2010 with an identical or significantly smaller percentage of foreign-born residents than Finland.

What’s more, despite their many differences, Finland and the U.S. have an educational goal in common. When Finnish policymakers decided to reform the country’s education system in the 1970s, they did so because they realized that to be competitive, Finland couldn’t rely on manufacturing or its scant natural resources and instead had to invest in a knowledge-based economy. 

With America’s manufacturing industries now in decline, the goal of educational policy in the U.S. — as articulated by most everyone from President Obama on down — is to preserve American competitiveness by doing the same thing. Finland’s experience suggests that to win at that game, a country has to prepare not just some of its population well, but all of its population well, for the new economy. To possess some of the best schools in the world might still not be good enough if there are children being left behind.

Is that an impossible goal? Sahlberg says that while his book isn’t meant to be a how-to manual, it is meant to be a “pamphlet of hope.”

“When President Kennedy was making his appeal for advancing American science and technology by putting a man on the moon by the end of the 1960’s, many said it couldn’t be done,” Sahlberg said during his visit to New York. “But he had a dream. Just like Martin Luther King a few years later had a dream. Those dreams came true. Finland’s dream was that we want to have a good public education for every child regardless of where they go to school or what kind of families they come from, and many even in Finland said it couldn’t be done.”

Clearly, many were wrong. It is possible to create equality. And perhaps even more important — as a challenge to the American way of thinking about education reform — Finland’s experience shows that it is possible to achieve excellence by focusing not on competition, but on cooperation, and not on choice, but on equity.

The problem facing education in America isn’t the ethnic diversity of the population but the economic inequality of society, and this is precisely the problem that Finnish education reform addressed. More equity at home might just be what America needs to be more competitive abroad.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Frustrated Nigerian Man Commits “Facebook” Suicide

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 57 Second

(Codewit) A 30-year old Nigerian man from Delta State has killed himself after announcing the act on his Facebook page. Diano Ovie-Richy committed suicide on Christmas day after posting a macabre note he said was an “Xmas gift” to his facebook friends.

In a final note he left on Facebook on December 25, he told his friends that his death would be his Christmas gift to them. Before taking his own life, the suicide ranted over the refusal of the authorities at Delta State University to issue his B.Sc. degree.
 
“I’ve had failure in all aspects of my life,” he wrote. “I invested 10 years of my life for a B.Sc yet Umukoro, Oboreh and Odirin ate it up.”
 
He went on to blame supernatural powers for his failures in life. “Any business I run always fail, usually due to DEUS EX MACHINA. Some say I need deliverance because I’m cursed.”
 
Mr. Ovie-Richy was engaged to marry a young woman named Ariete, but cancelled the wedding even after announcing on December 7, 2011 that he was engaged to her. He also was expecting a baby. “Last month, getting married was aborted though I’m an expecting father.”
 
According to his suicide note, he decided to kill himself because he didn’t want his unborn child to see him suffer which would tempt him to take other people’s lives.
 
In his note, he mentioned three persons he said were appreciative of him: Mudiaga, his elder brother, and Pawon and Nehi, “my only two friends.”
 
Saharareporters contacted Charles Muka, the Police PRO of Delta State, for confirmation but he said that the police command had no information of the incident, but would investigate.
 
Two of the suicide’s Facebook friends, Akpomughe Vivian Jite and Ukane Christian, confirmed his death on their respective facebook pages.

Also in his suicide note, the deceased appealed to people to show love to his unborn child. “Please show my unborn child Omoovie when born in 2012 some love, kindness and favour in anyway you can.”
 
 â€œWhat’re you doing to help the person that is still alive?” he asked Nigerians who might look at him as a coward.
 
He however took a parting shot at God, “. I hate God 4 allowing d demons 2 continuously destroy my hardwork.”
 
SaharaReporters spoke to several family sources in Kokori Township in Ethiope East Local Government Area in Delta state where Ovie hailed from. The sources confirmed that Ovie committed suicide by hanging on December 25th 2011 after leaving his last message on Facebook at 1:29pm via mobile phone. In his last notes, he posted a quote from a popular song by Afro-beat maestro Fela Anikulapo-Kuti: “Double wahala 4 dead body n d owner of dead body.”

Family members also said the suicide was a 2009 graduate of business administration from Delta State University, Abraka.
 
One source told us that, even though Ovie hanged himself on December 25 2011, his body was found on December 26. A friend described him as a self-motivated young man who wanted to become a successful and famous entrepreneur.

 

The source said that his problem at the university was related to his final year “Thesis” widely known in Nigerian universities as “final year project.” SaharaReporters learnt that his Head of Department, Dr. F.G. Umukoro, who doubled as his project supervisor, had rejected his final year project because Ovie was late in submitting his final chapters. The friend said that Ovie claimed that it was Dr. Mukoro who had been absent from his duties. He reportedly got angry and refused to complete his project, thereby missing out on his final year graduation and youth service in 2010. The friend claimed all those issues had been resolved and that Ovie was listed to go for his NYSC in February 2012.

Several sources said the tipping point for Ovie was a proposed wedding to his heartthrob, Ochuko also known as Ariete. The wedding had to be postponed because Ovie couldn’t afford the elaborate ceremony. “They had to postpone the wedding date so that Ovie could find enough money to throw a big wedding,” said one source.

A friend of the deceased confirmed that Ariete was four months pregnant at the time Ovie committed suicide.

Ovie was buried on December 26th in a public cemetery in Warri, Delta State after traditional rites were administered. The family did not carry out an autopsy, and neither were the police contacted

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Iraq: Two realities stand out in American invasion

0 0
Read Time:5 Minute, 44 Second

 

Two realities stand out in the midst of all the noise and fury currently surrounding the debate in and over Iraq.

First, it is clear that the American venture in Iraq has ended in abject failure at the cost of 4,500 American lives and between 100,000 and 200,000 Iraqi lives. No weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq, nor was any link established between the Saddam Hussein regime and al Qaeda. Furthermore, as the events of the past few days demonstrate, the United States has been largely unsuccessful in establishing an inclusive, democratic order in Iraq, another objective touted by Washington to justify the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

What the American invasion ended up doing was creating unprecedented sectarian strife and totally debilitating Iraqi capabilities, thus tilting the regional balance of power in the energy-rich Persian Gulf substantially in favor of Iran.

Second, it is only Iran that can now prevent Iraq from sliding into the abyss of chaos and disintegration. This argument has a simple logic. Iran is the country with the greatest leverage with the Shia-dominated al-Maliki government. In fact, al-Maliki would not have been able to put together a coalition after haggling for nine months, and become prime minister for a second time after the last elections, had Iran not weighed in on his behalf. Iran is also the state with the greatest stake in keeping Iraq unified and ensuring its sovereignty, because Iraq’s disintegration could adversely affect Iran’s national integrity and its aspirations to become a regional leader in the Middle East.

While the major Shia parties in Iraq — the Dawa Party, the Sadrists, and the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq — are not Iranian creations per se, all of them are beholden to Iran in multiple ways. Their leaders lived in exile in Iran during Hussein’s rule, and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps trained their militias. Their links with the IRGC and the militias’ dependence on Iranian training and weaponry continue to exist. Whenever the going gets tough for any Iraqi Shia faction, its leaders take refuge in Iran, as Muqtada al-Sadr did time and again over the past few years.

Iraqi dependence on Iran is bound to grow now that the Americans — who had tended to favor the Shia over the Sunni in Iraq — have departed the shores. The al-Maliki government, its current bombast notwithstanding, will soon realize — if it has not done so already — that it is surrounded by a host of latently hostile Sunni Arab neighbors, from Saudi Arabia and Jordan to Egypt and potentially Syria. Iran is its only dependable ally and one which it cannot afford to alienate.

Iran also forms the lifeline of the Iraqi economy, especially in the predominantly Shia south. Iranian pilgrims flock to the Shia holy cities of Najaf and Karbala, providing livelihood to thousands of Iraqi citizens. Cheap Iranian manufactured products flood the Iraqi market, and Iranian contractors are involved in infrastructure projects such as power, health and housing.

Iran is now Iraq’s second largest trading partner after Turkey, which has a near monopoly on trade with Iraqi Kurdistan. Additionally, Iranian financial support keeps many Iraqi Shia institutions, parties, and leaders afloat.

In short, the Iraqi government’s dependence on Iran in political and economic terms is of a very high order. This provides Tehran with enormous leverage that it can use, if it so desires, to compel the al-Maliki government to undertake a radical course correction and return to the model of a more inclusive political system rather than one based simply on Shia demographic strength. Shiites constitute approximately 60% of the Iraqi population, with Sunni Arabs and predominantly Sunni Kurds each accounting for about 20%.

There is every reason to believe that such a course correction is in Iran’s long-term interest for a number of reasons. First, if the Iraqi state disintegrates as a result of al-Maliki’s policies, Iraqi Kurdistan, currently an autonomous entity, will be emboldened to declare itself a sovereign, independent state. This would run contrary to Iranian state interests, since Iran is also home to a restive Kurdish minority whose demands for autonomy border on independence.

An independent Kurdish state next to Iranian Kurdistan would not only be a bad example (from the perspective of the Iranian state) for Iranian Kurds, it would also become a center for Kurdish irredentism, stoking demands for pan-Kurdish unity that would have deleterious consequences for both Iran and Turkey.

Second, Iran has regional ambitions not only in the Persian Gulf, but also in the broader Middle East region. The Iranian regime is fully aware of the fact that one of the major hurdles in its path toward regional pre-eminence is its Shia character. Much of the rest of the Middle East is predominantly Sunni Muslim. This was a major, if not the primary, reason that Iran’s post-revolution leaders emphasized the “Islamic” rather than the Shia nature of the Iranian revolution, thus enhancing its appeal among the Sunni majority in the Middle East.

Iran’s support to Muslim causes — the Palestinian cause foremost among them — regardless of the sectarian composition of the affected Muslim populations has added greatly to the popularity of the Islamic Republic, particularly among the Arab public.

Al-Maliki’s sectarian policy is bound to hurt not only Iraqi interests, but also the image of Iran in the Middle East, and adversely affect its ambitions to act as a major player in the region, especially since Iran is perceived as the principal supporter of the al-Maliki government.

It is, therefore, in Iran’s interest to rein in al-Maliki’s sectarian proclivities and to maneuver to have him replaced as Iraq’s leader if he is not amenable to Tehran’s advice. Muqtada al-Sadr can be used by Iran to pull the rug from under al-Maliki’s feet, since al-Maliki is now dependent upon the 40-member Sadrist group in Parliament to keep him in office. (The Iraqiya — the coalition of Sunni and secular Shia groups to which al-Hashimi belongs — withdrew its support from the governing coalition.) That the Sadrists, one of the three main Shia groups in the Iraqi Parliament, may be contemplating such a move themselves is indicated by their demand on Monday that Parliament be dissolved and new elections held.

The Sadrist agenda may, in fact, coincide better with the Iranian one, given al-Sadr’s visceral anti-Americanism, which stands in sharp contrast to al-Maliki’s ambivalence toward the United States. But regardless of this fact, it is becoming increasingly evident that al-Maliki’s current policy runs contrary to Iran’s interests. It is also clear that only Iran is in a position to force him to reverse course and thus to save Iraq from disintegration and civil war.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Mohammed Ayoob.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

The Love Trap : exposing scammers in Kualar lumpur

0 0
Read Time:10 Minute, 20 Second

Most of us have figured out by now that transferring our life savings into a Nigerian bank account is a mug’s game.

We know there’s no royal fortune. No multi-million dollar return. In fact, no hope of ever seeing our money again.

Maybe that’s why the men behind those dodgy emails have moved on to scams that are more sophisticated, and far more callous.

Now they don’t just bankrupt their victims, they break their hearts as well.

So we decided to take them on at their own game.

We set up a sting of our own and it wasn’t long before the sharks took the bait.

Story contacts:

Datescreen
www.datescreen.com.au
(03) 9982 9358

Queensland Fraud Squad
(07) 3364 6622

Scamwatch
www.scamwatch.gov.au

Romance Scam
www.romancescam.com

Full transcript:

LIAM BARTLETT: In a luxury hotel room, we carefully set our trap “ with the help of experienced fraud investigators. Our targets lurk in the street below “ Nigerian conmen awaiting the call from another victim. But this time the call will come from us and undercover police are ready to pounce.

DAMIEN: No more mucking around “ you want your money, come up. I’ll give it to you, you can go. These greedy scammers are slicker than ever. To better hide their tracks they’ve spread from Nigeria to become a global pandemic.

BRIAN: They’re intelligent, they’re resourceful, they’ve got global networks and let’s face it “ at this point in time, they’re winning the battle.

LIAM BARTLETT: Here in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, our chance to strike back.

DAMIEN: That’s when you and the police come in.

LIAM BARTLETT: On behalf of the 10,000 Australians who, despite all the publicity, still hand over a total of $10 million to these shysters every single month.

DAMIEN: You count¦

LIAM: Good afternoon, we’re from 60 Minutes Australia and you seem to be in a lot of trouble.

JULIA: Well. They’re the lowest of the low. They’re absolute scumbags and they are a poor excuse for a conman.

LIAM BARTLETT: When we first exposed Nigerian scammers in Lagos six years ago, they ran a simple but lucrative operation “ sending dodgy emails around the world requesting money, with the lure of a handsome return.

POLICE: Sit down! Sit down!

LIAM BARTLETT: But the swindlers have a new schtick. They’ve moved onto dating sites and the cruel hook they use is the promise of love.

ROSALIE: I suppose he absolutely had me by my heart. This guy was just telling me everything that I wanted to know.

LIAM BARTLETT: He was saying everything he knew you wanted to hear.

ROSALIE: Everything I wanted to hear, yep. He was making me feel as if I was worth a person.

LIAM BARTLETT: Rosalie is 53 “ divorced and terribly lonely. For romance scammers, the perfect mark. Looking for love online, she met Benjamin Walthol “ a handsome, American businessman, working in Malaysia. Ben wooed her for hours at a time “ he even sent flowers. Rosalie believed she’d finally found true love. And when the man of her dreams asked for loans to help his business, she happily handed over thousands.

ROSALIE: $90,000 plus what I still owe in phone calls and I have a debt of fifteen thousand dollars.

LIAM BARTLETT: You’ve given away your entire life savings and you’re in debt?

ROSALIE: Yes.

LIAM BARTLETT: But even now, Rosalie clings to the dream that Ben will repay the loans and they’ll begin a new life together as he promised. Her brother Neville knows better.

NEVILLE: The whole family has been banging their heads against a brick wall. It’s very difficult.

LIAM BARTLETT: At the risk of breaking his sister’s heart, Neville has sought professional intervention to expose the truth.

JULIA: Look, Neville brought us here because we have some serious concerns about the man you’ve met online and that he’s not the person he claims to be.

LIAM BARTLETT: Julia Robson is a new breed of the investigator. She runs DateScreen, conducting background checks for people who’ve met on dating sites “ and business is booming

JULIA: The golden rule is if you’ve met them online and they ask for money, it is a scam.

LIAM BARTLETT: Julia has followed Rosalie’s money trail to Malaysia and noticed references to a man called Bidemi Bakare.

JULIA: Bidemi, his name came up on documents that Rosalie was sending via Western Union. His name was written on the documents as collecting it, so straight away we had a suspect in mind

LIAM BARTLETT: And sure enough Rosalie’s white, middle-aged Lothario, Benjamin Walthol, is a fake. This is the man who’s really been romancing her “ Bidemi Bakare. His Facebook page reveals a champagne lifestyle in Kuala Lumpur, funded by the money he’s swindled from Rosalie and countless other women.

JULIA: We’ll find him. We’ll track him down and we’ll prove to you that this person you thought was Benjamin Walthol is really Bidemi.

BIDEMI: I miss you, I’ve been thinking about you long.

JULIA: Oh I know, I can hardly sleep

LIAM BARTLETT: And so in Kuala Lumpur, we set out to take on this swindler at his own game. Julia poses on a dating site as Amber “ and befriends Benjamin.

BIDEMI: I’m thinking baby, I’m thinking if you can send some round figure of say $20,000 so I can have some pocket money on me, you know.

LIAM BARTLETT: You did exactly what he does. Created another identity and targeted him

JULIA: That’s exactly it.

LIAM BARTLETT: And sure enough, Bidemi comes sniffing for the easy cash “ $23,000 that Amber has promised will be delivered by a business associate. Former Victorian undercover cop, Damien Marratt, is playing our middleman.

DAMIAN: We bought in the ruse that she had a friend, Jack “ myself “ who often travels through Singapore and Asia on business and basically I could deliver the money personally.

LIAM BARTLETT: We’ve wired the room with microphones and hidden cameras. It’s one thing to get Bidemi to the room but for a conviction, we need the money shot “ the moment he accepts the cash.

DAMIAN: We’ll have a quick chat to him, show him the money, get everything we need on tape just to show he’s involved in the scam and yeah, that’s when you and the police come in.

LIAM BARTLETT: In an adjacent room, we wait with surveillance gear, Julia, and a posse of Malaysia’s finest detectives. Out on the street, undercover police surround the hotel.

DAMIAN: Sorry mate, $23,000. I don’t know about money here, but $23,000 is a lot of money.

LIAM BARTLETT: But after repeated phone calls, we fear Bidemi is getting cold feet. Then finally, a knock on the door…

DAMIAN: I’m Jack “ So who have I been talking to? Sit down ..

LIAM BARTLETT: ¦ but it’s not our man. The crafty conman Bidemi has sent a local teenager to collect the cash.

DAMIAN: That is three ¦you counts to make sure.

LIAM BARTLETT: Hi, good afternoon “ we’re from 60 Minutes Australia’ and you seem to be in a lot of trouble. It’s a bust, but not our target. We want Bidemi

DAMIAN: Ben if you want your money no more mucking around. If you want your money comes up. I’ll give it to you, you can go…

LIAM BARTLETT: So, we take a gamble. We let the courier go, knowing he may run. But our hope is he’ll lead us right to our main man. And yes “ in the streets around the hotel, the undercover police swoop. Bidemi and five accomplices “ nabbed. Do you know Rosalie?

BIDEMI: I don’t, sir.

LIAM BARTLETT: You don’t know, Rosalie. What have you done with the $53,000 she gave you?

JULIA: You are the lowest form of a conman that I have ever met. The woman that I’ve spoken to “ the pain and the destruction of their family you have caused from this stupid little trick. All of you, look at you “ you’re absolutely disgusting. The stories I’ve heard “ I have no sympathy for these people. None whatsoever.

BIDEMI: She says she thinks I’m Benjamin.

LIAM: Yes, because you called yourself Benjamin’.

BIDEMI: Yeah, I know.

JULIA: Now the moment of truth “ proving Bidemi is Rosalie’s online lover, Benjamin. And guess who’s number we find on his phone.

LIAM BARTLETT: Oh, what a surprise! Hello is that Rosalie? We’re standing in a hotel in Kuala Lumpur at the moment and I’ve got a fellow standing next to me wearing a set of handcuffs. He just wants to say a few words, see if you can recognise this voice. Can you just talk to him for a moment?

BIDEMI: Hello?

LIAM BARTLETT: Don’t be shy, tell them what name you’re using now.

BIDEMI: Benjamin. Benjamin Walthol.

LIAM BARTLETT: Unbelievably, we found the numbers of another 81 Australian women on Bidemi’s mobile. That list is being investigated by Australian authorities. So you’re halfway through that list and so far it’s almost 100% strike rate?

BRIAN: Yes.

LIAM BARTLETT: On the victims.

BRIAN: Yes.

LIAM BARTLETT: He was a busy boy, wasn’t he?

BRIAN: Well he was very successful until you people came along.

LIAM BARTLETT: Brian Hay’s job, as head of the Queensland Fraud Squad, is to catch the scammers. But he spends more time counselling their targets.

BRIAN: You’re not victims, you’re survivors. You’ve gone through it, you’ve come out the other end and you’re not letting the bastards get it from you anymore.

LIAM BARTLETT: In Brisbane police headquarters, a support group for women “ and men “ who’ve been stung by Nigerians.

WOMAN #1: I willingly parted with $300,000.

MAN: You get sucked in and you find out when it’s too late and it’s cost you money.

WOMAN #2: He talked to me for quite a while, madly in love with me, never seen me before but madly in love with me. And wanted to make my life good.

BRIAN: For these people, it is love. They believe it, they live it, they breathe it, they yearn for it and to them, it’s very real, very tangible.

POLICEMAN: They’re sending the money to Nigeria.

LIAM BARTLETT: Meanwhile, back at Bidemi’s place, we’re following the paper trail. Most of those ill-gotten gains are sent straight back to Nigeria into the hands of criminal gangs and even terrorist groups. But men like Bidemi cream enough of the profit to keep themselves in the best of bling.

LIAM BARTLETT: Where does a student get $800 for a pair of designer label sneakers?

BIDEMI: My mum, she sent pocket money.

LIAM: Your mum sent you pocket money?

BIDEMI: Yeah.

LIAM BARTLETT: From Nigeria?

BIDEMI: Yeah.

LIAM BARTLETT: You got the most generous mother in the world have you? Gee. $800 for sneakers. There’ll be no Louis Vuitton where Bidemi and his fellow conmen are headed “ Malaysian prison and then deportation back to Nigeria.

ROSALIE: I don’t hate him I just feel sorry for him. I don’t know how that a person could do that to someone who’s just trying to help and that’s all I wanted was to help him to get out of Malaysia and he promised me absolutely a new life.

JULIA: These people are in a place in their life where they are lonely, they are looking for love, something…

LIAM BARTLETT: Does that make them silly?

JULIA: No, it doesn’t make them silly. There’s nothing wrong with having friendships and falling in love with someone online. That’s not the issue.

LIAM BARTLETT: The danger arises when that love is blind “ Rosalie’s desperate heart made her ignore all the warnings. Even, after all, we’d told her, Rosalie had been back at the computer being wooed by a new man calling himself Richard’. Rosalie, while we’ve been having this interview, we’ve checked out Richard Williams’ email and guess what? It’s on a blacklist. He’s a scammer too. He’s not who he says he is and he certainly doesn’t love you as he’s professing.

ROSALIE: Really? You’ve actually checked out that email address as…

LIAM BARTLETT: While we’ve been talking. Rosalie, please turn the computer off, Rosalie. Just please turn the computer off. If you can’t see the whites of their eyes and they’re not buying you a drink. Don’t talk to them.

ROSALIE: No one buys me a drink. That’s the whole problem.

 

Reporter:Liam Bartlett
Producer: David Alrich

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

How 2face, Femi Kuti, Obesere and others rocked TOP10 MICS concert

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 25 Second

 

Following several weeks of media blitz about the biggest concert of the year, TOP10 MICS, fans have given the Friday, December 23rd concert a pass mark as it lived up to its billings. The concert which held at the famous Tafawa Balewa Square (TBS), Lagos gave teeming fans something to cheer, laugh and a feeling the concert was worth every cent.

The concert paraded 10 of the best hands in the music industry, 2face Idibia, MI, Eldee, Mocheddah, Femi Kuti, Obesere, Sir Shina Peters, P Square, Wizkid and Duncan Mighty. The show started as early 7pm with many stars on the red carpet posing for the paparazzi.

Ace comedian, Ali Baba co-hosted the concert with the elegant presenter, Chioma from STV. Iconic DJ, Jimmy Jatt was the man on the wheel of steel at the concert and he proved to the audience the reason why he is still Nigeria’s most sought after disc jockey.

 To keep the audience entertained, the Son of the music legend, Ebenezer Obey, Tolu, thrilled all present with some of his father’s tunes and this was more than welcomed by the crowd as they danced to the rhythm, other up and coming music acts followed after the performance of Tolu Obey.

Soon after,  Mocheddah opened the TOP10 MICS concert officially with her hit track ‘’loke loke’’ to the delight of many, she also performed other tracks off her album. Sir Shina Peters held the crowd spellbound when he performed some of his old tracks and the crowd sang along with him he performed songs from his ‘’Ace’’ album, which was a massive hit years ago.

Duncan Mighty, who wore a grey color blazer on stage performed ‘’Obianuju’’ and ‘’Port harcourt boy’’ to the delight of the audience. Wizkid gave a ‘’Grammy’’ performance with his hit track ‘’I love my baby’’, pakurumo among others. The Okoye Brothers, P square wowed the crowd with the hit ‘’chop my money’’, ‘’Ifunaya’’ and others. Abass Obesere and his dancers gave the crowd something to think about when he performed.    

In between these performances, the delectable A-list actress and songstress, Stella Damasus gave a stellar performance with choir-like backup singers to sing Christmas carol songs in the spirit of the season.

Grammy nominee, Femi Kuti didn’t disappoint his fans as he took them way back with his tunes; it was also a moment to celebrate his third Grammy nomination with his teeming fans. Hypertek headliner, Tuface Idibia did his piece by implicating the crowd with his award winning track ‘’Implication’’. Trybesmen boss, Eldee closed the concert but not after he had performed ‘’today’’ and ‘’wash’’, his newly released singles which are currently enjoying massive air plays.

The twitter handle of the concert @koga_top10mics was bombarded with tweets concerning the biggest concert of the year 2011 as fans voiced their utmost satisfaction about the Friday, December 23rd event.

Speaking on the concert an official of KOGA Entertainment, Anu Awoseyi, the brain behind the TOP10 MICS concert said ‘’we appreciate the fans that thronged the venue in their thousands and we want to reiterate that this will be a yearly event as that of year 2012 will be bigger and better than this and to the reputable organizations that supported this concert, we can’t thank you enough’’.

The partners for the concert include Ozone cinemas, Genesis cinemas, KFC, Swe Bar, Lindaikeji, Bellanaija, ASCON Filling Station, BEAT FM, COOL FM, NAIJAFM, WAZOBIA FM, I want Air play, Galaxy TV, Shakara Clothing, Hibuzz, Gabrielz360, Ynaija, Soarnaija, and City Mall. Bigsam Media handled the media and publicity for the concert.

From

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Desmond Elliot, Tonto Dikeh,Chika Ike,Moyo Lawal,Alex Ekubo and others joined Uti for charity event

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 18 Second

 

What better way to celebrate the festive season and also thank God for all he has done for you throughout the year other than show love and care to the less privileged and needy in the society. This was what multi talented entertainer and famous reality show winner Uti Nwanchuwku of the Big Brother Africa (BBA) fame had in mind when he decided to gather his friends and colleague in the entertainment industry together to a charity event organized by his fan club at Ojez on the 21st of December 2011.
The event  which was solely a charitable work done to cater for the needy in the society  had many celebrities, fans and friends of Uti in attendance and saw them trooping out in their numbers to donate food items and material things to the needy who had been carefully selected from different parts of the state. Among the friends of Uti in attendance were; sultry Nollywood diva, Tontoh Dike, Susan Peters, talent Nollywood actor and Glo ambassador Desmond Elliot, Actors Alex Ekubo and Micheal Okon, Music diva Goldie, soap opera stars Ajibade Gbenro Emmanuel,Moyo Lawal and Halima Abubakar, Nollywood diva,Chika Ike,former MR Nigeria Bryan Okwara and  Keneth Okoli,  former Gulder Ultimate man Micheal Nwachukwu, and the recently crowned Ultimate man Christopher Okechukwu, RnB star,Dipp and Lanky C.
A galaxy of celebrities who stormed the event had a nice time socializing with the celebrated children and widows by wining and dining with them and afterwards got busy by dancing to selected tunes playing by the DJ. Music Stars who attended also serenaded the celebrants with their hit songs.Dipp,Dezign. CEO of Back to black Don Amando brought along his artistes like K kenny, Benny P and Oluwemawe. Lanky C’s voice was also one to remember. They all thrilled the audiences with their performances.

For Uti, this was just his way of celebrating the festive season and also appreciating God’s goodness to him through the year.
The charitable event was organised mainly to cater for widows, and the physically challenged children in the society. Among the organisations which benefitted from this charitable works were; God’s wife, a widow’s home, school for physically challenged children Modupe Cole, school for the down syndrome kids etc. After the fun, the food and gift items were shared out to all the schools and charity homes present.
Friends of Uti didn’t only come out to honour the event but they also showed their generosity by bringing along with them various food items and gifts for the less privileged and the widows who were been celebrated. Amongst the items brought by the cheerful donation were bags of rice, cartoons of Noodles, bags of salt, packets of Tin Tomatoes, packs of Toilet Tissues, pampers, bottles of drinks, bags of beans, cartoons of juice, clothes etc.
Other Notable People/outfits that supported this cause include Orode Uduaghan(daughter of Governor of Delta State) who sent down 50 Bags of Rice; Martini who recently endorsed Uti and Eku set up a mini Bar to entertain the guests. Md of GDN Alexander Kuthor made sure Matini gave it’s full support. Also helping out with Refreshments was Prime Chinese as their Manager Mr Henry Udoh brought food to cater for about 30 people.
Speaking about the event, Uti says “for me I have had a very good and successful year, this year alone I have won four awards and done five movies, and also anchored many shows, so for me this year has been rewarding both financially and career wise, so I thought instead of spending on partying and getting drunk with friends, why not spend the money on people who the society has forgotten like the widows and physically challenged children who are in need and what better time to do that other than the season of love, a time of sharing.
 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Mercy Johnson ends the year on high notes

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 33 Second

 

…Emerges Google’s most searched celebrity, beaten only by Facebook and 2go

…wins Outstanding actress award in Australia

One actress who made so much news in the year 2011 is delectable screen goddess Mercy Johnson.

Saying that the year has been a really wonderful year for her is stating the obvious, as the curvaceous actress remained number one choice in Nollywood from Asaba, Enugu, Lagos, to Abuja and beyond gracing posters and movie jackets.

In the year under review, she got married and was adjudged the best actress at the Afro-Australian Music and Movies Award (AAMMA) which is the only African award event in the whole of Australia and New Zealand. The award recognized Mercy Johnson as Africa’s Queen of the screen which is a symbolic recognition. The award which is the third edition held at the Emmore Theatre in Sydney, Australia. Though Mercy Johnson was regrettably absent at the awards due to mixed up flight logistics beyond her control but prolific Nollywood actor, Desmond Elliot received the award on her behalf.

Adding icing on the cake, MJ as she is fondly called recently emerged the most ‘goggled’ Nigerian celebrity on the popular search engine Google. According to statistics by Google, Mercy Johnson was the most searched Nigerian celebrity on the internet. She was beaten to the third place by Facebook, the social networking site, which came first, followed by 2go, a mobile messenger that allows one to chat with friends for free.

Apart from playing lead roles in big budget movie and acting in more than a dozen movies through the cause of the year, ,Mercy Johnson has also gained headlines throughout the year with her daring move to go bald for a movie role and her controversial  wedding in August  and also for her blindness rumor recently.

 The Okene, Kogi state native who made her movie debut in ‘’The Maid’’ years ago has appeared in over 100 movies and still counting and with other notable awards to her credit including the best actress at the exquisite Future Awards among others Mercy is truly the star to beat.

The top search terms concerning Mercy Johnson include: ‘mercy Johnson wedding’, and ‘Mercy Johnson blind’, ‘about Mercy Johnson’ among others.

Specifically thanking her fans Mercy says “I really appreciate you all for your love and concern throughout the year and also for your concern and calls about the blindness rumor, I really appreciate you all for the love, i felt so loved, didn’t know people care so much about my safety this much”

According to her PR Agency, Bigsam Media, the actress is on her knees saying thank you for being there for her all through the year. ‘We really want to thank Mercy’s fans and the general public for making her so significant in their lives and in this country by extension. I appreciate them for making me their favorite”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Venezuela’s Chavez: Did U.S. give Latin American leaders cancer?

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 40 Second

CARACAS (Codewit) – Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez speculated on Wednesday that the United States might have developed a way to give Latin American leaders cancer, after Argentina’s Cristina Fernandez joined the list of presidents diagnosed with the disease.

It was a typically controversial statement by Venezuela’s socialist leader, who underwent surgery in June to remove a tumor from his pelvis. But he stressed that he was not making any accusations, just thinking aloud.

“It would not be strange if they had developed the technology to induce cancer and nobody knew about it until now … I don’t know. I’m just reflecting,” he said in a televised speech to troops at a military base.

“But this is very, very, very strange … it’s a bit difficult to explain this, to reason it, including using the law of probabilities.”

Chavez, Fernandez, Paraguay’s Fernando Lugo, Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff and former Brazilian leader Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva have all been diagnosed recently with cancer. All of them are leftists.

Doctors say Fernandez has a very good chance of recovery and will not need chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Her diagnosis was made public on Tuesday.

Chavez said other regional leaders should beware, including his close ally, Bolivian President Evo Morales.

“We’ll have to take good care of Evo. Take care Evo!” he said.

The 57-year-old is Latin America’s loudest critic of U.S. foreign policy along with Cuba’s former leader Fidel Castro, and he frequently lashes out at what he calls the “Yankee Empire”.

CASTRO’S WARNING

“Fidel always told me, ‘Chavez take care. These people have developed technology. You are very careless. Take care what you eat, what they give you to eat … a little needle and they inject you with I don’t know what,'” he said.

In his comments on Wednesday, Chavez also slammed Washington and its European allies for criticizing Russia’s recent parliamentary elections – and said they were planning the same thing for Venezuela’s presidential election in October, when he will seek re-election.

“They are crying fraud and saying the elections need to be re-run … They’re trying to destabilize no less than Russia, a nuclear power. That’s the madness of the Empire,” Chavez said.

“I say this because here in Venezuela, the Imperial Yankee, the local bourgeoisie, and a good part of what they call the opposition parties here, are preparing a similar plan,” he said.

“I call on the armed forces to be alert, on the Venezuelan people to be alert. Because we are not going to let the Imperial Yankee destabilize Venezuela again like they did in the past.”

Details about Chavez’s health remain a closely guarded secret, although he now appears to be recovering and is making longer and longer televised appearances.

Earlier this month he made his first official foreign trip after his surgery, to a regional summit in Uruguay.

Since his return he has often appeared sporting something of a younger, new look: a dark sports coat over an open-necked maroon shirt, and is hair is growing back after chemotherapy.

It is far cry from the green fatigues and red beret that he became famous for wearing for much of his 13 years in power.

(Editing by Kieran Murray)

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %