A Farcical And Anarchic Look At Nigerian Vehicle Plates

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Read Time:12 Minute, 26 Second

Laughter, they say is the best medicine. Let’s take a comic look at our predicament in Nigeria.

A “farce” is defined as “A light dramatic work in which highly improbable plot situations, exaggerated characters, and often slapstick elements are used for humorous effect”. And “The broad or spirited humor characteristic of such works”. Or “A ludicrous, empty show; a mockery: e.g. The Maurice Iwu-conducted 2007 election was a farce.

Most often, the term “anarchy” describes the simple absence of publicly recognized government or enforced political authority or a state of lawlessness or political disorder due to the absence of governmental authority. When used in this sense, anarchy may or may not imply political disorder or lawlessness within a society. In another sense, anarchy may not refer to a complete lack of authority or political organization, but instead refer to a social state characterized by absolute direct democracy or libertarianism.

OK, you tell me. Nigeria does not fall into this category of anarchy. But how do you describe a country where one of its authority agencies, the Police, openly and brazenly waylay and collect money from motorists on the highways everyday; or where political thugs who call themselves transport union members, run amok killing, maiming and intimidating their opponents and ordinary citizens  on a daily basis in Ibadan and other capitals around the country; or where kidnapping goes on unabated in the eastern part of the country or un-checked religious and ethnic strife in the northern parts of the country, or where the judiciary colludes with corrupt politicians to deliver spurious judgments detrimental to democratic and political enfranchisement  and progress of the people or indeed, a country where political leaders (s)elected and entrusted to give us succour and progress brazenly steal and loot the treasury everyday?

The good state of Bayelsa proclaims to the world on car number plates that it is the “The Glory of All Lands”. Thank God, they are not calling it “The Wealth of the Nation”, that would have been too obvious, isn’t it? But what exactly is their glory there? Oil spills, dirty and foul-smelling creeks, gas-flaring and irresponsible governors and local chiefs? All these and the corruption have given the state’s slogan a hollow ring.

Plateau is “Home of Peace and Tourism”. My wife was born, bred and buttered in Jos, the capital. Its cool climate and cultural landmarks have always made it an attraction for the rare tourists who make it to Nigeria, but Plateau has been plagued by religious and ethnic violence promoted and sustained by evil, calculating politicians that have killed hundreds. What have they turned one of the most beautiful environments in the world into?

As for Kaduna, it earned the label of “Liberal State” for its cosmopolitan and lively atmosphere. However, it has suffered from several bouts of religious violence, including the 2002 Miss World riots that killed 200 people after Muslims were angered by an article about the beauty pageant. Just last year, when President Jonathan picked Kaduna State Governor, Namadi Sambo, a Moslem, as his Vice-president, thus constitutionally paving the way for his Deputy Governor, Patrick Yakowa, a Christian, to become the new governor, there was some grumbling amongst the Moslems. Credit to Kadunans, they quickly sorted it out.

Some states have adopted more mundane slogans for their number plates. Nassarawa is “Home of Solid Minerals”, but where are the minerals to complement the oil?  Last I heard, those solid minerals are mined by individuals who never make any returns to the Federal Government, and the Federal Government is in full awareness of this but cannot do anything about it because these are powerful illegal miners.

Benue is “Food Basket of the Nation”, more like “Basket-mouth of the Nation” to me. I don’t see the baskets of food. Most of them disappear into neighbouring Cameroun. But really, you should see their yams.

Others take a more abstruse approach. Yobe declares “The Young Shall Grow”, what the hell does that mean, really? How long will they grow?

Kwara proclaims itself a “State of Harmony”, well, one thing for sure, the Sarakis have harmonised all the resources and even the people of the state so much that I think the slogan should simply be “The Sarakis’ Own State”.

Abia is “God’s Own State”, no more, no less. (Let’s dance to Fuji music – apologies to late Ayinde Barrister). Yes, indeed. Why not “God’s Own People”? God gave Abia Orji Kalu, and the state has never been the same again. I know of only one God’s own people, and they are not in Abia State. They give Igbos a bad name.

Akwa Ibom is “Land of Promise”. Promising what? The killing of twins and the identification and punishment of children as witches?  And Cross River as the “People’s Paradise”, well, maybe Obudu Cattle Ranch is the only paradise in the world. But I doubt it. I love the people of the two states, but they should discard all these bad cultural beliefs.

Borno State is the inappropriately named “Home of Peace”, with Boko Haram fanatics running around burning churches and killing policemen. Home of Piece, I’d call it.

I love Delta and Edo States. They are both hearty. Delta is the “The Big Heart”. More like the Big Art for me, with all the best “akpavin” and “skillo” located there. But what even makes it more heated is what ex-Governor James Ibori did there. He proved that treasury looting and stealing is an art and a hit. Edo is “The Heart Beat”. How they let that dullard boy Lucky run roughshod over them for eight years is beyond me, but it proves indeed the Edos, Esans and the Akoko-Edos do have big beating hearts, warm and welcoming and, unsuspecting of dubious politicians.

Adamawa is the “Land of Beauty”. I’d have agreed 100% were it not for the clueless retired naval officer with four wives who has made absolutely no impact on the state in the past four years and still wants to be there. One thing for sure, his fours wives are beautiful.

And “Coal City State”, Enugu State? Yes, the last time I heard about coal coming from Enugu was when I was in the primary school in the 1960s. Since then, all the coal must have disappeared into some people’s land and pockets.

Jigawa is “The New World”, a lovely state whose only contribution to Nigeria’s economy is production of dates, yes, the fruit called date. Yes, nobody, even the inhabitants exploit this versatile fruit.

Kano, the “Centre of Commerce”. Really? Where are the famous groundnut pyramids we used to see in the 60s? Kano residents no longer plant groundnuts? They are perhaps more interested in the “commercial” pastime of increasing the population that makes Kano State the most densely populated state in the country.

“Fountain of Knowledge” state, Ekiti, never cease to make me laugh. With all their professors and academicians, they might as well be illiterates. I’ve never seen a people more moribund. Yet they still have visions of Ibadan oppression of over 200 years ago. Inferiority complex!

And talking of “Pacesetter State”, my very own State of Oyo, living on and regressing into past glory. Pacesetter indeed! Since 1999, they have been taking one pace forward and ten backwards. In fact, they have not set any pace for the last 20 years. They still don’t know how to get the hell out of political thuggery. Imagine giving the country its first official political godfather and reputation for political thuggery. Only God can forgive Oyo politicians. I can’t.

Anambra is the “Home for All”. Last time I spoke to an Anambran, he confided to me that no non-indigene of Anambra had ever been sold land in Awka before. They simply don’t welcome foreigners. So how can it be home to all Nigerians?

Ebonyi is “The Salt of the Nation”. I will be honest with you, I don’t know much about this obscure state. They hardly make any noise worth noting. Is their salt there or are we talking metaphorically here? Salt of the earth? Right here in Nigeria? You are kidding me.

Katsina is the “State of Hospitality”. Sounds more to me like State of Hostility. The fact is that there’s narry a thing hospitable about that state. Turai Yar’Adua proved that to me.

Rivers State is the “Treasure Base of the Nation”. It will be, I suppose. That’s why their immediate past governor looted the treasure as had never been seen before in Nigeria. By saying that, the good people of River States are practically inviting treasury looters to come and have a field day.

Zamfara is the “Farming is our Pride”. I hope so; I want to see the food aplenty. Let the people farm. If not, get the hell outta there, Governor.

Taraba is “Nature’s Gift to the Nation”. Yes, that is right, together with Adamawa, a very beautiful tourist and natural paradise, but I see very little how nature is being exploited to the fullest here, thanks to clueless political leaders.

“The Gateway State” is Ogun State’s contribution to meaningless sloganisation. Geographically, maybe it is a gateway to the country, but politically and economically, a state that for the past eight years has been a gateway to political killings and chicanery. Some people need jail here.

Ondo is the “Sunshine State” as if the sun only shines on them. With a moon shining ex-Governor, I didn’t see much sun here until Mimiko liberated them. Don’t rest on your oars, boy.

Osun State’s “The State of the Living Spring” is an allusion to the great Osun River. This means these people still belive in African Traditional Religion. Good for them, but it did not help them for almost eight years where “Oyin ni o” was busy playing golf in Ada rather than governing the state, and a murderous senator waiting to take over. Now they have a “Teblik” in the state house, and the senator’s ambition thwarted, maybe things will change.

Sokoto is the “The Seat of the Caliphate”, aptly named, but what does that translate into, in terms of development and religious harmony? Feudalism at its worst! Does not give us confidence in democratic values and hopes.

Niger State is “The Power State”. Why wouldn’t it be? What with two former military dictators of questionable characters coming from there, and one of them still thinking he holds the reins of power in his hands.

Imo State is the “Land of Hope”. Or the “Eastern Heartland”. Why didn’t they add “and Glory”, and then I will know they are Americans? Actually, Imo people exude hope; I can say that – look at Nwakwo Kanu, Chioma Ajunwa and Emmanuel Amunike. But they have to do more than giving us Maurice Iwus. Incidentally, they are my in-laws, and I love them for their forthrightness.

Gombe is the “Jewel in the Savannah”. Hmm. I don’t know what makes it a jewel, but it sure is in the savannah. Have they heard that savannahs sustain wheat, and other cereals?

Bauch State is the “Pearl of Tourism”. Yes, with the game reserves, I suppose they can lay claim to that. And it was the home of our first Prime Minister, a very humble man called Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa. In Hausa the word Bauchi means the land of slaves. Bauchi and Adamawa were the two main sources of slaves for the Fulani Empire of Sokoto. Maybe that name is still working on them.

Kebbi is the “Land of Equity”. For a state that used to be part of the Sokoto Caliphate and introduced Sharia laws, I wonder where the Equity is coming from. But we are all here waiting.

Kogi, another of my favourite state is aptly nicknamed “The Confluence State”, because the Rivers Niger and Benue join there. I’d rather call it “The Confused State” because of the shenanigans of its former Governors. The state has been cursed with treasury looters since day one of its creation.

But by far the most famous and celebrated number plate in Nigeria is Lagos – “Centre of Excellence”. My honest opinion? And you don’t have to agree with me. Lagos is far from being a Centre of Excellence. Don’t let us delude ourselves. Governor Fashola might be doing a good job, but there remains 97% to be done to make Lagos truly a centre of excellence. That is a fact. It is still a dilapidated, disorganised, lawless city of violent crime, slums, traffic jams, expensive and pollution. Only 20 % of the money being spent on Abuja for selfish and ethnic reasons could be spent on Lagos to make it truly a Centre of Excellence that all Nigerians can be proud of.

And lastly, but certainly not the least is our Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, or FCT.  It is called “Centre of Unity”. All well and good, that’s what every patriotic Nigerian yearns for – unity. Have Nigerians heard of Unity in Diversity? Apparently No! We still don’t realise it that our diversity of tribes and tongues is supposed to be our unity and strength.  And those unscrupulous politicians are not making it any easier. That is why I laugh when I think of Abuja as the Centre of Unity. Ask me: How many southerners has been the Minister of the FCT since the city was created?  Many Nigerians still see it as a Northern city.

Nigerians are either living with delusion or deliberately like to confuse and mislead themselves, convincing themselves that they are a sophisticated people of the world. I will not be surprised if in the nearest future, we hijack the phrase “God’s Own Country” from the Americans and start using it to describe our country. After all we like everything American even if we don’t like the people themselves. Wouldn’t you know it?

But then: God Bless Nigeria and Nigerians. I just love my people. They can’t go wrong, can they? Except in the matter of who they chose as their leaders.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Bogus cancer doctor charged with sexually molesting his sedated cancer patients, held on $33M bond

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Read Time:2 Minute, 37 Second

He may be the creepiest quack in Brooklyn – a bogus cancer doctor charged with a crime so heinous it earned him the highest bail in state history.

Michail Sorodsky, 63, not only failed to heal the gravely ill women who forked over wads of cash for his holistic therapies, he sexually molested them and even raped at least one sedated patient, prosecutors say.

Jury selection in the skin-crawling case begins in Brooklyn Supreme Court this week while Sorodsky continues to be held on an eye-popping $11 million cash bail or $33 million bond a figure higher – more than even Bernie Madoff faced.

Authorities say Sorodsky slathered his victims in a probiotic yogurt, inserting the concoction into their genitalia, claiming they would be healed.

“He tells people he can cure them, and nobody gets better,” said prosecutor Thomas Schellhammer, of the state’s Attorney General’s office. Sorodsky, who isn’t licensed to practice medicine, is facing 102 counts ranging from rape to fraud.

All the charges stem from just eight victims, but prosecutors say he treated hundreds of people – mainly Russian immigrants in Brooklyn who paid as much as $1,000 per visit.

The late Malka Klots was a patient. When her daughter Rimma heard of Sorodsky’s unorthodox treatment for liver cancer, she sensed something was fishy. So she posed as a patient and was horrified by what she found at Sorodsky’s Sheepshead Bay office.

“What he was doing was, he was giving a gynecological exam, and he was giving a breast exam. It wasn’t necessary. It didn’t feel like a doctor’s examination,” the 46-year-old teacher recalled. “He did say inappropriate things. Something like, ‘Your breasts look good.'”

She filed a complaint with the Division of Licensing, which led to an investigation that ended with Sorodsky’s 2007 arrest.

It was too late for her mother, who died in 2001 after her cancer spread to her spine.

“She put everything into this treatment, all her hope,” Rimma Klots said.

In court, Sorodsky cuts a bizarre spectacle. Wearing a crumpled yarmulke atop gray frizzy hair, he relies heavily on a Russian translator, but is prone to frequent outbursts in English.

“It is inquisition,” he blurted out during a hearing. “I am somebody, pioneer. I am a scientist.”

He claims to be unable to see and sports big black shades in court, but sources described him as “conveniently blind.”

He also goes through lawyers like tissues and is currently on his 13th.

The accused quack is being tried alongside his 62-year-old wife, Beverly Sorodsky, who’s acting as her own lawyer. She faces nine, mostly larceny, counts, but is still being held in lieu of $1 million cash or $3 million bond.

Sorodsky’s current attorney, Aaron Mysliwiec, said the high bail was “punitive and unfair.”

“He’s denying the charges against him and looking forward to trial,” Mysliwiec said.

The defense is expected to argue that Sorodsky never presented himself as a doctor, but as a holistic healer – which requires no license – and that his patients returned voluntarily even after supposedly being abused.

Prosecutors claim otherwise, saying Sorodsky instructed clients to stay away from mainstream medicine.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Armed pro-Gadhafi gangs roll in Libyan capital

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Read Time:8 Minute, 21 Second

TRIPOLI, Libya – The embattled Libyan regime passed out guns to civilian supporters, set up checkpoints Saturday and sent armed patrols roving the terrorized capital to try to maintain control of Moammar Gadhafi’s stronghold and quash dissent as rebels consolidate control elsewhere in the North African nation.

As violence mounted, Gadhafi came under growing pressure from the international community to halt the crackdown on his people. Echoing moves by the United States, Britain and other nations, the U.N. Security Council on Saturday imposed sanctions, including an arms embargo and a travel ban, and said the International Criminal Court in the Hague should investigate.

Residents of its eastern Tajoura district spread concrete blocks, large rocks and even chopped-down palm trees as makeshift barricades to prevent the SUVs filled with young men wielding automatic weapons from entering their neighborhood — a hotspot of previous protests.

With tensions running high in Tripoli, scores of people in the neighborhood turned out at a funeral for a 44-year-old man killed in clashes with pro-regime forces. Anwar Algadi was killed Friday, with the cause of death listed as “a live bullet to the head,” according to his brother, Mohammed.

Armed men in green armbands, along with uniformed security forces check those trying to enter the district, where graffiti that says “Gadhafi, you Jew,” “Down to the dog,” and “Tajoura is free” was scrawled on walls.

Outside the capital, rebels held a long swath of about half of Libya’s 1,000-mile (1,600-kilometer) Mediterranean coastline where most of the population lives, and even captured a brigadier general and a soldier Saturday as the Libyan army tried to retake an air base east of Tripoli. The state-run news agency also said the opposition held an air defense commander and several other officers.

On Friday, pro-Gadhafi militiamen — including snipers — fired on protesters trying to mount the first significant anti-government marches in days in Tripoli.

Gadhafi, speaking from the ramparts of a historic Tripoli fort, told supporters to prepare to defend the nation as he faced the biggest challenge to his 42-year rule.

“At the suitable time, we will open the arms depot so all Libyans and tribes become armed, so that Libya becomes red with fire,” Gadhafi said.

The international community toughened its response to the bloodshed, while Americans and other foreigners were evacuated from the chaos roiling the North African nation.

In New York, the U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to slap sanctions on the Gadhafi regime. The council imposed an arms embargo and called on U.N. member states to freeze the assets of Gadhafi and his children. The council also imposed a travel ban on the Gadhafi family and 10 close associates.

Council members also agreed 15-0 to refer the regime’s deadly crackdown to a permanent war crimes tribunal for an investigation of possible crimes against humanity.

The action came after U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said some estimates indicate more than 1,000 people have been killed in less than two weeks since the protests broke out in Libya.

President Barack Obama said Gadhafi has lost his legitimacy to rule and must step down immediately. Obama, who made the comments Saturday to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, signed an executive order a day earlier that froze assets held by Gadhafi and four of his children in the United States.

In Tripoli, most residents stayed in their homes Saturday, terrified of bands of armed men at checkpoints and patrolling the city.

A 40-year-old business owner said he had seen Gadhafi supporters enter one of the regime’s Revolutionary Committee headquarters Saturday and leave with arms. He said the regime is offering a car and money to any supporters bringing three people with them to join the effort.

“Someone from the old revolutionary committees will go with them so they’ll be four,” the witness said when reached by telephone from Cairo. “They’ll arm them to drive around the city and terrorize people.”

Other residents reported seeing trucks full of civilians with automatic rifles patrolling their neighborhoods. Many were young, even teenagers, and wore green arm bands or cloths on their heads to show their affiliation to the regime, residents said. All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisals.

Tripoli, home to about a third of Libya’s population of 6 million, is the center of the eroding territory that Gadhafi still controls.

Even in the Gadhafi-held pocket of northwestern Libya around Tripoli, several cities have also fallen to the rebellion. Militiamen and pro-Gadhafi troops were repelled when they launched attacks trying to take back opposition-held territory in Zawiya and Misrata in fighting that killed at least 30 people.

Gadhafi’s son, Seif al-Islam, told foreign journalists invited by the government to Tripoli that there were no casualties in Tripoli and that the capital was “calm.”

“Everything is peaceful,” he said. “Peace is coming back to our country.”

He said the regime wants negotiations with the opposition and said there were “two minor problems” in Misrata and Zawiya. There, he said, “we are dealing with terrorist people,” hut he hoped to reach a peaceful settlement with them.

Most shops in Tripoli were closed and long lines formed at bakeries as people ventured out for supplies.

In the Souq al-Jomaa neighborhood, piles of ashes stood in front of a burned-out police station. Graffiti on the walls read, “Down, down with Gadhafi.” Elsewhere, shattered glass and rocks littered the streets.

A law school graduate walking to his house in the Fashloum area said he had seen many people killed by snipers in recent days.

“People are panicked, they are terrified. Few leave their houses. When it gets dark, you can’t walk in the streets because anybody who walks is subject to be shot to death,” he said.

He said Gadhafi’s use of force against protesters had turned him against the regime.

“We Libyans cannot hear that there were other Libyans killed and remain silent,” he said. “Now everything he says is a lie.”

In Tripoli’s Green Square, where state television has shown crowds of Gadhafi supporters in recent days, armed security men in blue uniforms were stationed around the plaza. Pro-Gadhafi billboards and posters were everywhere. A burned restaurant was the only sign of the unrest.

Supporters in about 50 cars covered with Gadhafi posters drove slowly around the square, waving green flags from the windows and honking horns. A camera crew filmed the procession.

Taxi driver Nasser Mohammed was among those who had a picture of Gadhafi and a green flag on his car.

“Have you heard the speech last night?” he asked. “It was great. Libyans don’t want anyone but Gadhafi. He gave us loans.”

Mohammed, 25, said each family will receive 500 Libyan dinars (about $400) after the start of the protests, plus the equivalent of about $100 credit for phone service. State TV said the distribution will take place starting Sunday.

Gadhafi loyalists manned a street barricade, turning away motorists trying to enter. After turning around, the drivers were then stopped at another checkpoint, manned by armed men in uniform, who searched cars and checked IDs of drivers and passengers.

In Misrata, a resident said the opposition was still in control of the city, which was calm Saturday, with many shops open and a local committee running civic affairs.

But the opposition only held parts of the sprawling Misrata Air Base after Friday’s attack by Gadhafi supporters, he added.

The troops used tanks against the rebels at the base and succeeded in retaking part of it in battles with residents and army units who had joined the uprising against Gadhafi, said a doctor and a resident wounded in the battle on the edge of opposition-held Misrata, Libya’s third-largest city, about 120 miles (200 kilometers) from the capital. The doctor said 25 people were killed in fighting at the base since Thursday.

The resident said pro-Gadhafi troops captured several members of the opposition Friday and now the two sides are talking about a possible swap since the opposition also captured a soldier and a brigadier general. Libyan state TV confirmed that army Brig. Gen. Abu Bakr Ali was captured, although it said he was “kidnapped by terrorist gangs.” The state-run news agency JANA also said regime opponents held the commander of the air defense’s 2nd Division and several other officers.

State-run TV reported that the website of the JANA news agency was hacked.

A Libyan Islamist activist, Mokhtar al-Mahmoudi, was arrested in Tajoura on Thursday, according to his daughter Fatma al-Mahmoudi, who lives in Morocco. She said a neighbor also was arrested.

Al-Mahmoudi was arrested in 1998 over his ties with the Muslim Brotherhood and spent eight years in prison, she said.

The opposition also held complete control of Sabratha, a town west of Tripoli famed for nearby ancient Roman ruins, with no police or any security forces associated with the Gadhafi regime, said Khalid Ahmed, a resident. He added that tribes were trying to organize a march on Tripoli, although a checkpoint outside the capital would stop anyone from entering.

“All of Libya is together,” Ahmed said. “We are not far from toppling the regime.”

Thousands of evacuees from Libya reached ports Saturday across the Mediterranean, with many more still trying to flee the North African nation by sea, air or land.

More than 2,800 Chinese workers landed in Heraklion on the Greek island of Crete aboard a Greek ship Saturday, while another 2,200 Chinese arrived in Valletta, the capital of Malta, on a ship from the eastern Libyan port of Benghazi.

Thousands of expatriates streamed out of Libya at the bustling Tunisian border, most of them Egyptians and Tunisians.

More than 20,000 have arrived since early this week, said Heinke Veit of the European Union Humanitarian Aid group. Food, water and medical help is available, as are facilities to contact their families.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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UN Council slaps sanctions on Libya’s Gadhafi

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Read Time:4 Minute, 38 Second

UNITED NATIONS – The U.N. Security Council moved as a powerful bloc Saturday to try to halt Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s deadly crackdown on protesters, slapping sanctions on him, his children and top associates.

Voting 15-0 after daylong discussions interrupted with breaks to consult with capitals back home, the council imposed an arms embargo and urged U.N. member countries to freeze the assets of Gadhafi, four of his sons and a daughter. The council also backed a travel ban on the Gadhafi family and close associates, including leaders of the revolutionary committees accused of much of the violence against opponents.

Council members additionally agreed to refer the Gadhafi regime’s deadly crackdown on people protesting his rule to a permanent war crimes tribunal for an investigation of possible crimes against humanity.

The council said its actions were aimed at “deploring the gross and systematic violation of human rights, including the repression of peaceful demonstrators.” And members expressed concern about civilian deaths, “rejecting unequivocally the incitement to hostility and violence against the civilian population made from the highest level of the Libyan government.”

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon congratulated council members for the unified vote, saying it “sends a strong message that gross violations of basic human rights will not be tolerated.”

“I hope the message is heard, and heeded, by the regime in Libya,” Ban said.

British Ambassador Mark Lyall Grant called the vote “a powerful expression of the deep concern, indeed the anger, of the international community.” U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice said it was “a very powerful message to the leadership of Libya that this heinous killing must stop and that individuals will be held personally accountable.”

French Ambassador Gerard Araud said the unanimous referral of the case to the tribunal signaled a new commitment by the international community to its responsibility to protect citizens. “A wind of liberty and change is sweeping throughout the Arab world and I think the Security Council succeeded in responding to this new era of international relations,” he said.

Top EU diplomat Catherine Ashton said the European Union “fully endorses this resolution and will implement the restrictive measures as a matter of urgency.” Ashton noted that the EU had already started work on its own sanctions, and formal adoption is expected soon.

The sanctions were welcomed by Libya’s deputy U.N. ambassador, Ibrahim Dabbashi, whose entire mission is among Libyan diplomats around the world who have renounced Gadhafi.

Dabbashi said the council vote will engender “moral support for our people who are resisting” and could help defeat “this fascist regime still in existence in Tripoli.” He called on the Libyan armed forces to abandon Gadhafi and throw their support to the protesters.

Richard Dicker, director of Human Rights Watch’s international justice program, was impressed by the council’s unanimous vote and said the action “sends a powerful signal on behalf of justice for the people of Libya and all others victimized by mass force and violence.”

The Libyan uprising that began Feb. 15 has swept over nearly the entire eastern half of the country, snatching entire cities in that region out of the government’s grasp. Gadhafi and his backers continue to hold the capital Tripoli and have threatened to put down protests aggressively.

There have been reports that Gadhafi’s government forces have been firing indiscriminately on peaceful protesters and that as many as 1,000 people have died.

Council members did not consider imposing a no-fly zone over Libya, and no U.N.-sanctioned military action was planned. NATO also has ruled out any intervention in Libya.

Indian Ambassador Hardeep Singh Puri noted his country is not an ICC member, and would have “preferred a calibrated and gradual approach,” but decided to accept the referral because other council members believed it would help end the violence in Libya.

There had been doubts that China, a permanent council member with veto power, would join the vote if the referral to the tribunal was included. But Chinese Ambassador Li Baodong said his country was concerned about the large number of Chinese citizens who work in Libya.

Earlier on Saturday, U.S. President Barack Obama said in a telephone conversation with German Chancellor Angela Merkel that Gadhafi needs to do what’s right for his country by “leaving now.”

The White House on Friday announced sweeping new sanctions and temporarily abandoned its embassy in Tripoli as a final flight carrying American citizens left the embattled capital. The U.S. put an immediate freeze on all assets of the Libyan government held in American banks and other U.S. institutions. The sanctions also freeze assets held by Gadhafi and four of his children.

Britain and Canada, meanwhile, temporarily suspended operations at their embassies in Tripoli and evacuated their diplomatic staff.

Gadhafi is no stranger to international isolation.

U.N. sanctions were slapped on his country after suspected Libyan agents planted a bomb that blew up Pan Am Flight 103 over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988, killing 270 people, mostly Americans.

Libya accepted responsibility for the bombing in 2003 and pledged to end efforts to develop weapons of mass destruction. The U.S. and Libya in 2009 exchanged ambassadors for the first time in 35 years, after Libya paid about $2.7 billion in compensation to the families of the Lockerbie victims.

In Geneva on Friday, the U.N. Human Rights Council called for an investigation into possible crimes against humanity in Libya and recommended Libya’s suspension from membership of the world body’s top human rights body.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Ojukwu, the People’s General Lives On

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Read Time:14 Minute, 15 Second

While reflecting on why Biafra lost the war of survival against Nigeria, in which about 3 million Igbos died, some non-Igbo critics of Ojukwu are of the view that he led his own people tactlessly into what was clearly a foreseeable disaster. Others claim that due to his passion for power, he paid more attention to the politics of the war than to the one basic question of security. Yet, there are others who blame him for not securing the support of any of the world super powers before going to war with Nigeria, etc. Though, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu who, like every human being, may have his weaknesses, obviously must have made some mistakes in life, given a lot of reasons.

Unlike the typical corrupt African politicians averse to steadfastness, Odumegwu, for instance, did not betray communist East Germany educated Chuba Okadigbo, who engineered his return back to Nigeria from exile in the Ivory Coast. As a one-time special adviser on political affairs to the National Party of Nigeria (NPN) Dr. Okadigbo advised the Shehu Shagari government that granting Ojukwu a state pardon would ensure appreciable level of Igbo support for NPN, which prior to that time was seen by Igbos as a `Hausa party` and therefore had feeble presence in Igboland. How people connected with Ojukwu was evident in the hero’s welcome he got when he set his foot in Nigeria after 13 years of exile. Prominent politicians from various political parties in the land wanted to tap into the NPN investment, holding out before him some goodies, promising to add the heavens to the earth being dangled by the NPN, if he could throw the NPN pact into the nearest dustbin. Indeed, he was tongue-lashed by some of his Igbo people, who felt he had broken ranks, and might cut into the Nnamdi Azikiwe-led Nigeria Peoples Party’s (NPP) electoral advantage in the East. At that time, NPP controlled the only two Igbo states in Nigeria – Anambra and Imo, and Plateau state, which is outside Igbo land. Therefore, NPP was where much of Igbo loyalty lay. But Ojukwu firmly stood his ground, as he dutifully maintained the political pact with the second republic government.

Ironically, he found himself being the centre of intrigue by the NPN, which had a capacity to trivialize even the most serious issues. Concerned about Ojukwu`s enigmatic influence, they did not only abandon him, but rigged him out of a senate seat to a little known state commissioner called Dr. Edwin Onwudiwe, who was in then Governor Jim Nwobodo’s cabinet. Ojukwu would later jokingly refer to himself as Onwudiwe’s ID, meaning the man’s only way of identifying himself was to say, “Am the man who won Ojukwu in an election.” The path home for Ojukwu was laced with treachery, as he was, for instance, restrained by successive military governments from laying down his head in his father’s house at 25 Queens Drive Ikoyi, Lagos. The government had used the excuse of rebellion against the state of Nigeria to confiscate the property. Nigerians stood by him out in the open, and with the awkward walls within which he had anything being an old rickety bus, all that in the rainy season. It was from there that he fought to reverse an eviction. According to him, as an old soldier, he could adapt to any condition. The military government’s arm was eventually forced by public anger it couldn’t stand any longer, to let go of the man’s property, but not after series of court rulings. Also, Ojukwu’s military pension which was also one of the conditions for the state pardon didn’t start coming until 41 years after the end of the civil war.
Ojukwu has held many important positions in the country. His first job was to oversee colonial affairs as a district officer in the town of Udi. He had also worn the UN helmet as a peace keeper in the Congo Crisis of the 1960s. Ojukwu was to hold forth as the first Quarter-Master-General of the Nigerian Army, and later discharged himself satisfactorily as the commander of the 5th battalion of the Nigerian Army in Kano. His next posting was as the Military Governor of the old Eastern Region in Nigeria. He moved with the circumstance in Biafra to become a four-star general and head of state of that country. He threw his heart into the political arena once again in 2003, founding the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) and contesting the Nigeria presidential elections as the party’s flag bearer. 
At no time in his public service has Ojukwu been swayed by corruption, something to which his contemporaries look kindly. This is an excellent record in a country like Nigeria. It is believed that part of his father’s wealth was channelled into the Biafra war effort. Ojukwu is guided by the principle of contentment. You don’t look any further for a true and astute leader. When he was once addressed as a chief by an interviewer, he replied, saying, “I am not a chief; it rhymes with thief.”
Intellectually, and among his contemporaries, Ojukwu is one of the brightest. Not surprising, Ojukwu’s father was Sir. Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu, a Hope Waddell Institute educated-parliamentarian in Nigeria’s first republic. Ojukwu senior was a business mogul and said to be one of the richest men in Nigeria in his time. He was also founding president of the Nigeria Stock Exchange, as well as president of the African Continental Bank (ACB), and was in the boards of most of the powerful companies in Nigeria at the time. The senior Ojukwu made no mistake of what he wanted his son to be, sending his son to the elite Kings College in Lagos. At 13, Ojukwu was on his way to Europe to enrol at the elite Epsom College. Ojukwu proceeded to the famous Oxford University, where he obtained a Bachelor’s as well as a Master`s Degree in History. But Ojukwu will downplay these academic acquisitions, and tell you that “Education is not elitism, education actually, to me, is more a question of sharpening one’s choices and consciousness. The value in it is the effect one has on one’s people.”
Ojukwu is a highly talented man who can strike it out with you in various Nigerian languages. The English author Frederick Forsyth recollects that Ojukwu made the atmosphere in the flight that brought him back to Nigeria from exile very cordial, as Ojukwu freely cracked jokes and interacted with all the delegations sent to receive him in their original languages of Yoruba, Hausa and, of course, Igbo. He also interacted in French with the Ivorian delegation sent by his host president late Félix Houphouët-Boigny of Ivory Coast.
Also, unbeknownst to many people, Ojukwu learnt how to speak Yoruba language first before his own native Igbo language. The early sign that Ojukwu would not grow up to become a weakling but the defender of people against injustice and oppression started when he was only 11 years old. He was briefly imprisoned by the colonialists for assaulting a white British colonial teacher, who had humiliated a black woman at King’s College, Lagos. The incident generated widespread coverage in local newspapers. The second incident was at the age of 13 at Epsom College in Surrey, United Kingdom, where a naughty white boy caused Ojukwu’s African accent to make his colleagues shake with laughter. One day, at the hallway to the chapel, he heard one of them call him `monkey` and another tripped him and his books were all scattered on the floor. The boy had no idea he and his colleagues had been provoking a sleeping lion by always intentionally and contemptuously stepping on its tail, hence the boy got the beating of his life and a three-day admission in the hospital to go with. Ojukwu would be among those who would eventually be at the boy’s bedside, and they became friends thereafter. These incidents serve to prove the Igbo adage which says that “the sign of a pear that would darken to maturity starts with a dark spot at the head.”
As one of the detribalized leaders in Nigeria Ojukwu played an outstanding role in neutralising the first coup in Nigeria, even though he had to confront the coup leader and a fellow Igbo officer, Major Chukwuma Nzeokwu and other officers from mainly southern and, especially eastern Nigeria. It weakens the argument of people determined to justify an assault on a people by claiming it was an all-Igbo coup. The coup was largely seen as successful in the North and partly in Lagos as Lagos was then the seat of power, and both the prime minister of the country and the premier of the North had been killed. But it lost momentum as Ojukwu refused to cooperate with the coup plotters in the North and pitched loyalty with Gen. Aguyi-Ironsi, the legitimate commander of the Nigerian army, who ensured the coup plotters wouldn’t accomplish their aims in Lagos. Then, came the unrestrained killings of Igbos in the North led by mainly northern military officers among whom were, Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, Lts ADS Wya, Ibrahim Babangida, Garba Duba, Lt. Col. Murtala Muhammed, Lt Col. Shehu Musa Yar`Adua, Capt. Ahmadu Yakubu, Capt. Daramola, Lts. Buka Sukar Dimka, Lts. Shelleng, Hannaniya, Muhammadu Jega, Sani Abacha, Saleh Dambo and many others.For instance, over 20 Igbo officers were executed at the Brigade HQ on 29 and 30 July 1966. Some of the eastern and southern officers killed during the first batch include Major O.U. Isong, Major Ogunro, Lt. Col. I.C. Okoro, Capt L.C. Dilibe, Major C.C. Emelifonwu, Capt. I.U. Idika, and Major A. Drummond. In accordance with the spirit goading the killers, Lt. Col Mohammed Shuwa, the commandant of the 5th battalion would preside over the massacres of Igbos at both the Kano airport and the main railway station in Kano.
Earlier, on July 29, 1966 in this on-going northern counter-coup, Theophilus Danjuma, Sani Bello, Martin Adamu and other Northern military officers had taken General T. Aguiyi-Ironsi the military head of State of Nigeria and his host Col. Francis Fajuyi to a location outside Ibadan and shot them to death. In the face of the madness, Ojukwu pursued a peaceful course. He had held onto the concept of one Nigeria. It caused him to make the tactical mistake of asking Igbos to return, after the first killings, to their former stations in other parts of Nigeria, following assurances by various individuals and groups. But the northern and other counter-coupists couldn’t resist a second round of bloodletting. Igbos killed in the two waves of attacks had totalled about 50,000. This is coupled with the fact that Ojukwu and Lt. Col. David Ogunewe for days had been pushing back against Igbos who wanted to go into and cut down northern soldiers at the barracks in Enugu. According to Nowa Omoigui, quoting Lt-General JS Jalo, the same “Northern soldiers who left Enugu unmolested got themselves involved in molesting departing Igbo refugees and looting their property in Ikeja barrack. The Igbo were going away and looting set in and some senior officers, I must confess, encouraged this to happen.”  In fact, 90% of officers from the East and some from the West were massacred in the North. Just a handful escaped to their home regions.
Regrettably these killings in the North are still continuing nearly 50 years on, though modified as religious riots. It is unfortunate that the Nigerian youth today would need special education to remove the image of death associated with the North, a place where petrol is poured on homes, fire lobbed in and the occupants consumed by raging fire. Where innocent people, including infants, are hunted and hacked to death with flimsy excuses. If it is not Zango-Kataf massacres, it would be Kano Maitatsine, numerous other Kano, Kaduna riots, Gombe Riots, Tafawa Balewa Riots, Kafanchan Riots, Bauchi Riots, Bulumkutu Maiduguri Riots, renewed Maiduguri Riots aka Boko Haram, Abuja Bombings, then the festering Jos Riots and Bombings. The list is endless, killing, killing and killing, every now and then! Interestingly, the culture is to keep your mouth shut and not openly frown at these silly acts, otherwise you would be seen as fanning the embers of disunity in a nascent democracy. Long live One Nigeria! May Allah and God help us all. Hey, what set off these two names simultaneously from my mouth? I digressed.
Following the slaughters in the North before the war, steps were taken to revert to normalcy. However, after series of meetings, including the one in Aburi, Ghana, some northern elites and Britain instigated the Gowon government to renege on the Aburi Accord. Gowon unilaterally split Eastern Nigeria into three states contrary to the federal structure agreed upon in Aburi, while Ojukwu, after consultations with leaders in the East, responded after three days by declaring the whole Eastern Nigeria as a sovereign state called the Republic of Biafra on 30th July 1967.

For effective results, natural resources are relied on in the prosecution of wars around the world. For example, Kuwait pays America with oil. In the Angolan war, UNITA traded in diamonds to obtain weapons, MPLA exchanged oil for weapons. See Diamond Fact Also, see Worldbank. The Taliban fighters and Al Qaida in Afghanistan are handing out raw, hard drugs for weapons. Even Charles Taylor of Liberia traded raw diamonds from neighbouring Sierra Lone with weapons.  See Naomi Cambel ordeal Likewise, Hamas in Palestine and Hezbollah in Lebanon are supplied with weapons by Iran and Syria. For the weapons it got, a country like Nigeria has an arrangement in which some advanced countries own and suck the oil in the country till it perhaps runs dry.  Foreign countries are given the free hand on projects like the sport the Russians made of Katsina, Itape, Jos and Ajaokuta rolling mills. It was only the Ojukwu-inspired Biafran scientists and inventors, notable names among whom were, the science genius Roy Umenyi, Ben Nwosu, Godian Ezekwe, Emma Osolu, Sam Orji, Njoku Obi, and so many others who during the Nigerian civil war, continued to dazzle with invention and manufacture of their own weapons. They wouldn’t stop at pulling off weapons like surface to surface missiles, ground to air missiles, rocket launchers, rocket-propelled grenades, assault rifles, but kept the world gaping with gun boats for amphibious attacks. There was also the famous Biafra Bomb popularly known in Igboland  as either `Ojukwu Bucket` or ‘Ogbunaigwe,` meaning the mass killer. The Biafran Shore Battery easily devastated marine craft, like the Oguta feat masterminded by Ojukwu. In Biafra, lorries that rolled into underground warehouses rolled out as armoured vehicles. Refining crude oil wasn’t a preserve of any refinery. It got domesticated, and was plentiful. Attempts were also made to build war airplanes, they tried virtually everything they could, but the starvation policy and the economic blockage by Nigeria and their western supporters crippled the new republic. What is interesting is that all this was achieved in the midst of the chocking hold on Biafra through blockade by the advanced countries, including the neighbouring Cameroon and Nigeria. That was also the time Nigeria signed off the oil rich Bakassi Peninsula which was on Biafra territory to Cameroon for their kindness in starving infants in Biafra. In fact, the Nigerian Santa Claus did really come to town after the victory over Biafra, throwing largesse anywhere one looked.

The elder statesman’s benefit to the country and Igboland in particular is even becoming more and more invaluable by the day. For example, his APGA has succeeded in giving Anambra State headed by the resourceful and amiable Governor Peter Obi a democratic, stable and meaningful government. Apart from the ex-Nigeria Information Minister Prof. Dora Akunyili who has resigned from both her office and her party PDP and joined Ojukwu`s APGA to contest a senatorial seat, there are many other prominent Igbo politicians who are abandoning their parties, mainly PDP, to  join in the APGA queue. With this trend, I foresee Ojukwu’s APGA taking over all the Igbo states in Nigeria. And, with the success of APGA so far and given the current situation on the  ground, it appears that what Ojukwu could not achieve militarily, he has succeeded in achieving through democratic means, by giving the Igbos a party they can call their own, at least in Anambra State and, with time, this will happen in all states in Igboland. Only time will tell. Also, see Nigerianelite Forum

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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China in Africa, the Fear among Europeans (Part 2)

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Read Time:4 Minute, 38 Second

Continuation from part 1

Here comes another contingent, a one time poor Asian country, China is now a major world player and it is trying to rewrite the rule of doing international business. And there is no better place to show this than the world most resourceful continent, Africa. Continue reading

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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China in Africa, the Fear among Europeans (Part 1)

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Read Time:7 Minute, 56 Second

This article is a product of the press conference, tagged: “Africa between Europe and China: which international cooperation today? New sceneries, actors and approaches” held last Saturday, 12 February, 2011 at the University of Padova, north of Italy.

Although as the Prime Minister of Italy he was embattled out of the government in 2008, Romano Prodi is still one of the tallest personalities in the peninsula country. Many will adjudge him as an intellectual repute and a perfect gentleman. Apart from being a one time president of the European commission (1999 to 2004), he also has a wealth of experience both at the international politics and the economy. He is currently lecturing at a university in Shanghai, China’s most crowded city.

Last weekend, Saturday 12th 2011, Mr. Prodi was celebrated as a guest speaker at the University of Padova, one of the most ancient universities in Europe, and he decided to stand by what many contemporary politicians would easily dodge away from; being honest in an argument, even when it’s not in your favour.

The press conference which began at half past nine in the morning was organised in collaboration with the University of Padova, the local government and CUAMM, a medical NGO that has been operating in some countries of Africa for the past 60 years.

Although the conferences was centred on Africa, another thing was also important, “the fear among some Europeans as to what might become of the present relationship between Africa and Europe” and by extension one of the main reasons for the conferences.

Many were the speeches and they were as diverse and intense as the different faces of the speakers, all in an attempt to resolve the African problems or at least identify them. This is how the African case usually goes, attractive, sensitive and sometimes complicated.

While some people are saying that it will require God himself to save Africa from its economic underdevelopment, some others have convinced themselves that the real solution actually lies in the promises from big western politicians and the generosity of countless NGOs across Africa.

In whichever way you see it, people must keep talking and the local Africans will keep paying the price. They will keep paying the price both for the wrong choices they have made the ones they were never able to make.

“I would love to talk on Europe and China in Africa…,” Mr. Prodi continued after greeting the cheering crowd, a mixture of politicians, academics, economists, NGO workers and several armies of African sympathisers.

Africa, he said, is the second largest continent with 20% of the world territory… Her population is expected to hit 20% of the global population in 2050, but today, Africa has 2,5% of the world production… “2,5%, to put it in abundance,” he emphasized.

With the affirmation, “73% of sub-Sahara Africans lives on less than 2 dollars a day”, Mr. Prodi concluded the first piece of his analysis.

Going further, he submitted: “the problem of rapport with Africa has become the card number one in G8 summits. Every year, there is a growing concern about Africa, in words, only in words. I have to say I have participated in ten G8 summits; five as the president of the European commission and five as the Prime minister of Italy. And with all honesty, we have never maintained the promises we have made…”

At this point one might begin to wonder. Why are the Europeans and their western allies such as the United States always the ones deciding the rules of engagement with Africa; whereas the same western powers can wilfully choose to honour or disregard their so-called promises and the conditions of engagement with their African partners, and nothing will happen?

By the end of the Second World War, a lot of Africans realised that, after all, they could fight for their own liberation from the hands of European powers, thereby starting a revolution which would have done them well as a people. But then, the European colonialists were smarter. They quickly decided to grant freedom to many Africans along the fragile borders, which have been created against the individual history and cultural evolution of the African people. Using the words of Prodi during the Padova conference, the created borders “had nothing to do with the ethnic or political histories” of the local people.

This was a trap and a well-coordinated one. It was going to be a true recipe for conflicts and be used to justify the present destabilisations in many parts of Africa. Right from the onset, however, the end result of this premeditated arrangement was known, “exploitation”.

By granting the kangaroo freedom and installing some local Africans who best suited the interest of European colonialists, the growing awareness about political consciousness and the pride of being a free people was thwarted in Africa. The revolution was eventually replaced with indirect colonialism and the false friendship between Africa and the West; the type of friendship which is still making the African development and self-dependency a rather illusive mission, even till date.

Since freedom is never granted to a people out of freewill but a pay off through the struggle of the concerned people whom at a certain level of maturity realises that they need to be free and so fight to be free, the European colonialists did not truly set the African political and economic system free during the so-called independence of the African states. In fact, they never will, until Africans are politically conscious enough to take their stand for self-determination, while keeping in mind the consequences that might await them.

Until then, nearly the whole continent of Africa might remain what it is today, a mere satellite village with a semi-independent system, which is strictly accountable to a coalition of western powers instead of the local Africans. And to some people, Africa will remain a piece of farmland or better still, an investment. This is why the African case is always at the table of each G8 summit, to decide on how to manage the investment, not because it has suddenly become a necessity to create a better standard of living for the Africans.

So no one should be surprised at the earlier remark by the ex-Italian prime minister and president of the European commission that the big western politicians are not keeping to their promises of alleviating poverty and human suffering in Africa. It is in fact not their job. It is the job of the African people to take up their responsibility and fight for their own interests and survival as a people. And not until they have realised that, no miracle is going to happen, not even with the presence of China in the continent.

Meanwhile, what has been helping to keep the African system in a vicious circle, “the relevance of Europe in Africa”, is now also the reason for the fear among some European futurists on the growing Chinese influence in Africa.

Europe has a great economy and politics, fine, but like the stages in human life which is also true of the human systems, Europe is not likely to grow younger any time soon. This is already visible, not only in the system itself, which has to confront the fast dynamic world of today, but also of the primary resources and the population growth and therefore the continue productivity, to meet the essence of capitalism.

Africans has been helping in this area and when fully analysed, Africa will become one thing to the European system, “an essential partner”, yet that is not the point.

Over the years, Europe has managed to maintain its relevance in Africa, using the indirect colonialism with their most faithful Africans, a system which has been working wonders since the 1960s, when many Africans believed that they have been set free.

This was made possible partly by some African lords and elites who are unable to see the local interests beyond their immediate families, their egos and personal aggrandisements. This was true both during the enslavement of millions of Africans and the current exploitation of African human and natural resources.

It was also partly due to the immaturity of the African political consciousness, a result of the aborted post-second-world-war revolution in Africa. Therefore, the African system has practically been a mirage.

Coming to power in many parts of Africa has only been a question of selection, whether in military dictatorships or in the democratic brouhaha, and those selected usually satisfy their masters in Europe and helping to keep the African continent the way it is. The local resources are repeatedly stolen away and the destination is usually the European market and those of their western allies. Infrastructures are not developed, therefore the local economies cannot satisfy the needs of the local people, not to talk of competing at the international level.

And since the local people are unable to provide their own needs then it is understandable that “they need help”, the number one characteristic in the Europe–Africa relationship. This has made Europe very relevant in Africa, because it usually ends up providing what the local systems were never pruned to provide, the means of survival of the local people. Therefore the western politicians and businessmen are able to dictate how the African system should be run.

Continue in part 2.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Student killed by police during peaceful protest staged in Ekiti State

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Read Time:39 Second

The pic  (sorry about it’s gory nature btw) is that of a young man named Gbenga Osanipin, who was shot dead by police during a peaceful protest staged in Ikole, Ekiti State, over the relocation of the site of a yet to be established Federal University (one of the 9 new universities the federal is planning to establish) from Ikole Ekiti to Oye Ekiti.

The Governor of the state, Kayode Fayemi, had announced Ikole-Ekiti as the site for the new Fed. University, only for the federal government to later announce Oye-Ekiti as the location, prompting a protest from some students and indigenes of the State.

The incident happened last week thursday and four other people were said to have been killed during the protest.

Sad. May their souls RIP

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nigeria denies Bill Gates’ visa application

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Read Time:1 Minute, 22 Second

Bill Gates’ visa application for Nigeria was rejected by its government initially. They wanted Gates to show proof that he would not reside in Nigeria indefinitely and cause a strain on Government’s services.

Bill Gates was recently visiting Africa, probably for his Gates Foundation charities, wanted to travel to Nigeria. He needed a visa from Nigerian Government, so when he applied for the visa, Nigeria denied him. The Nigerian government required proof that the Bill Gates would not stay in the country for a long time and become a burden to Nigeria’s social services and immigration.

Nigeria because of its oil wealth, many from other African countries immigrate illegally, so the Nigerian governement required assurances from Bill Gates that he will not be in the country for long.

A travel document expediter CIBT helped the billionaire Bill Gates overcome the hurdle by helping him with his application, obtained a letter from Gates’ bank that reassured the Nigerian authorities, who later approved his visa.{div width:200|height:90|float:left}{module Inside Advert 200×90|none}{/div}

Gizmodo.com writer says his holiday plans to Nigeria goes down the drain, if Gates has problems getting into Nigeria, he has absolutely no chance. No, not even with a Gizmodo email account as collateral—shocking.

I don’t know where the Nigerian government got the idea that Gates is going to stay in Nigeria for long; it must have been embarrassing for Gates. At least we have to admire Nigerian officials they didn’t care who the person was and just followed the government procedures.

Source: digitaljournal.com

 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nigerian ‘fake doctors’ to appear in South Africa court

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Read Time:1 Minute, 4 Second

Five Nigerian men and one Zambia man are due to appear in a court in South Africa accused of impersonating doctors and endangering people’s lives.

Special police investigators say they are believed to be part of a syndicate.

The men are alleged to have been running at least six private practices in at least three provinces.

CSI Africa, a private investigation firm, says the medical profession is one of the most targeted by fraudsters in South Africa.

According to its research, fake qualifications run at between 15% and 18% across various professions in the country.

The five Nigerian men are due to appear in the Middleburg Magistrates court in Mpumalanga province along with two qualified Nigerian doctors who are alleged to have allowed their medical numbers to be used to register more practices.

South Africa’s Board of Health Care Funders (BHCF), a medical lobby group, has said it is concerned that thousands of people may have been misdiagnosed by the suspects.

The authorities are also investigating reports that up to 17 other people suspected of being fake doctors have been treating patients in government and private hospitals.

Last week, a man who claimed to be a doctor was arrested after the woman he performed a caesarean section on died in the Eastern Cape province.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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