Adichie’s Feminism: Vacuums And Fallacies By A. Gonzaga

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Read Time:28 Minute, 39 Second

The general tendency of Adichie spitting out her half-baked opinions on just about every subject is worrying for reasons much more serious than their mere shallowness. It’s always a shameful thing to see Internet users—who don’t pretend to be intellectuals—submitting in the comment sections of publications counter-opinions that make mincemeat of those presented and promoted by the ‘intellectual’.

There has been much backlash towards Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s ‘feminist’ views, as well as towards her tasteless style of performance. Chimamanda Adichie I have, until now, wanted to stay out of the debate, mainly because of her arguments being pathetic as opposed to well-thought-out. But as the conversation has grown on social media—it seems to linger eternally, for Adichie keeps fuelling it with her well-timed, divisive remarks—I realise thoroughly the significance of the debate per se, and the need for me to partake in it. I should mention here that because of certain factors I consider myself well-positioned to examine and to present opinions on the matters in question.

1) The first is that the Igbo culture of south-eastern Nigeria, which Adichie constantly attempts to exploit to support her positions, is equally mine. 

2) I left Nigeria to study and settle overseas at about the same age as Adichie. I left Nigeria for Finland at the age of 20, in 2005, and she left Nigeria for the US at the age of 19, eight years before. She’s currently 36. I’m 29. Indeed, one might wonder why leaving Nigeria as a young person is pertinent, and I’ll explain as we proceed.

3) I have since been an integrated member of a society, country and region where the goal of feminism was first realised, and where it has thrived the most—in short and in fact: where it originated and has achieved its ultimate goal. I’m talking of Finland and the larger Scandinavia. (I should state clearly that I live in Finland, visit Nigeria often, and now write to you from Finland.)

I intend to tackle this issue supporting my points with ‘the age factor’ and ‘the fact that I can claim a better practical knowledge of feminism than Adichie can.’ I’ll make references where necessary, however, to the first factor of ‘the Igbo culture being equally mine’.

Adichie said we should all be feminists, backing that call with a series of shallow points—the most controversial of which was her argument that ‘Nigerians raise girls wrongly and in ways that make them feel guilty for being born girls’.

I heard this and it troubled me. I had to wonder which societies she speaks of: were they the southern Nigerian ones of the Igbo and Yoruba, or the northern ones? For, as most Igbo adults know, women are today better educated in Igboland than the men. And even when it comes to employment after graduation—there isn’t much to be had in the country in the way of career opportunities, irrespective of one’s gender. Folks are being trained for economic areas that do not exist in Nigeria. But even so, the few employment opportunities in Nigeria today favour women—I speak from experience, and can safely argue that I know more employed females than males of my generation, despite their attending the same schools.

And so one wonders which Nigeria Adichie speaks of with regard to girls being suppressed and raised wrongly. Unless she’s referring to the Muslim north, in which case she should know to be specific with her accusations.

The general tendency of Adichie spitting out her half-baked opinions on just about every subject is worrying for reasons much more serious than their mere shallowness. It’s always a shameful thing to see Internet users—who don’t pretend to be intellectuals—submitting in the comment sections of publications counter-opinions that make mincemeat of those presented and promoted by the ‘intellectual’. This has been my experience with Adichie’s proposals, and I now wonder whether she has any friends at all who are smart and kind enough to help her find balance?

Unquestionably, Adichie has been everywhere with her opinions in recent years—ill-conceived as they are doomed to be—plus ever-willing to present them in manners that confirm a thorough lack of tact and class.

Yes indeed, it’s OK to have strong opinions, but nothing confirms Adichie’s lack of a full integration into her American society—despite having spent many years there—than her consistently unashamed display of words betraying a lack of class.

Before advancing, I should pose this question: Is this Adichie that the people get on the media the real one, or is it the professional one? I should also like to add that my presentation is targeted purely at the professional Adichie—the one that thinks herself a goddess and mocks novelist Pa Chinua Achebe’s philosophy while so tactlessly looking down on Nigerians as lesser beings—for I’ve no way of knowing who she is in her private existence.

To make sense of this oh-so-messy phenomenon—I reckon I need to go a little deeper. Certainly not the deepest I could delve, just deep enough for the occasion. I mentioned the lack of a full integration into her American society as a contributing factor in Adichie’s lack of class, and I think so for the simple truth that nothing teaches the immigrant about class better than a full integration. By ‘class’ I mean ‘elegance, polish, refinement, sophistication’. And of course with ‘class’ comes ‘tact’. It’s no secret that Nigerians can spend years and even decades in the UK and the US and still end up never mixing with white people and the mix of cultures present in those societies. The superficial reason is the presence of large immigrant communities in those two nations—and among which the newcomers could comfortably hide and exist, avoiding the hassle of a full integration and cherry picking on the question of how they should interact with their new society. In addition to this unfortunate reality, unlike here in Scandinavia, the black and white divide in the US is major! And that’s to say that by remaining culturally and mentally on the peripheries of the American society, Adichie—as not I but her work substantiates—is torn unevenly between the Nigerian and American worlds. This dilemma is a major source of influence as far as her opinions go.

Does Adichie really need to tell Nigerians and the world that ‘We should all be feminists’? Does she really have to state so aggressively and needlessly in the public space that ‘Nobody can force her to change her last name’? Is it necessary to tell the world of her relationship with cooking, and is she supposed to be so unenviably troubled by what other persons would make of her relationship with the kitchen? These deeds all point to the existence of a vacuum—a vacuum that only class and good advisers could rightly fill.

Obviously, Adichie has been making more enemies than friends in recent years, and more people than she can imagine are asking if she’s OK. I’ve just mentioned one vacuum, but more are likely to be revealed as I progress. Ergo, let’s call this vacuum number one.

A brief return to the subject of a full integration. I present another Nigerian author of Adichie’s Generation X, one who now enjoys the full and priceless benefits of total integration: his name is Teju Cole, and he left Nigeria for the US at the age of 17. In my opinion he’s a refined human being, and the best writer Nigeria has produced since Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka, and his followers on social media, unlike Adichie’s, are mainly intellectuals and readers capable of higher thought and who follow Mr Cole because he offers that mental stimulation. To put it rather bluntly: where Mr Cole offers necessary mental stimulation, Adichie can only offer gossip.

This isn’t the same as saying that I do not respect Adichie’s enthusiasm. I think she has come a long way, and while I can’t say I admire her work, I certainly respect her professional energy.

***

But why, despite the Nigerian generosity toward her, does she continue down this unnecessarily controversial path with regard to her relationship with Nigerians and their beliefs? A person commenting under one of the articles about Adichie’s scorching opinions stated: ‘She comes across in all her interviews as if in a state of permanent intellectual rage.’

Nigerians have delivered more bitter counter-thoughts about Adichie’s professional ways than they have about any other foreign-based Nigerian artist. Only home-based movie actresses and actors with questionable characters have been condemned similarly.

Consider Adichie’s supposed penchant for invention. Tackling unworthiness is not quite the same as dealing with value. For unworthiness requires a stoop and value doesn’t. But unworthiness achieves the status of a discussion topic, and the question must arise: To stoop or not? Action or passivity? Sad has been the silence of those who today may call themselves Igbo or Nigerian intellectuals—all of whom have hitherto chosen to allow Adichie get away with her invented facts, fallacies, and absurd misrepresentations.

The Nigerian Internet space or social media being what it is, the risk of the critic being labelled ‘jealous’ or even ‘sexist’ can’t simply be ruled out. Quite a pathetic reality laughable in its backwardness—and self-destructive in its way of ensuring the absence of intellectual discourse while promoting sheer mediocrity.

Adichie is a writer of novels, with false cultural premises likely to influence surely not sensible adults but teenage women at the very least. But this is a world of men and women, when all’s said and done, and those teenage women will one day grow up to deal with both men and life. They will approach both with either good or bad heads, and then winning, or losing. And that, quite simply, is the chief danger of allowing Adichie to own this narrative with her false notions.

She self-identifies as a feminist whose idea of feminism concocts imaginary Igbo-society problems. She would like to smash men (her invented oppressors), and emancipate women (her co-victims). It’s a whimsical charade. And I refer once again—if in new words—to that major claim of hers, that the Nigerian society only teaches girls how to shrink themselves, limit their goals and learn not to threaten the male societal dominance.

Ngozi Okonjo Iweala, Dora Akunyili, Oby Ezekwesili, Chinwe Obaji, Kema Chikwe, Stella Oduah, Arunmah Oteh—these are all accomplished women of Igbo descent, with professional biographies most women of other continents would envy. It bears noting that women of this echelon can equally be found among other ethnicities of Nigeria. Even within the younger generation there are household names like Tiwa Savage, Genevieve Nnaji, Linda Ikeji and many others—influential by virtue of the free expression of their talents and opinions. Nigerian women have always chased their dreams while enjoying their rightful societal place even before the trees became squirrels’ land, and surely in advance of Adichie learning how to read and write.

Given that this is the same Nigerian society that Adichie attempts, desperately, to lecture on the emancipation of women, one could state explicitly that: the need doesn’t exist because the problem doesn’t. Current divorce records in Nigeria prove that most of them were filed not by men but women. And if that alone doesn’t nullify Adichie’s claim of Nigeria being a land of emasculated women, then let this be food for thought: emasculated women have never been known in any society to initiate divorce; they instead put up with their partner’s hubris, conform to the whims and caprices of their husband, and in essence accept their subjugated lives.

Adichie continues to miss the fact—or so it seems—that if anything, in today’s Nigeria women are increasingly empowered at the expense of the male population. It’s more likely that women, not men, will be hired for a job, and that’s even if they are neck and neck with regard to skills and qualifications. The bank cashiers, managers at major retailers, office desks at insurance companies, at the Nigerian civil service—one easily detects a higher female ratio, often of six women to one man. Sure as shooting, this isn’t to clamour for an equal male-female representation but merely to point out how Adichie’s claims are sorry figments of her own imagination and therefore deserving of no serious attention.

Culturally and even politically, women have always been involved, elevated and venerated, in the Igbo world. The institution of Umuada—the peace-making and unifying daughters’ guild of the Igbo which still exists to this day—is turned to many a time, but very tellingly especially where efforts by the men-folk have proved futile. This is widely documented in the literature of the academia. In his Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe says of it and of the general status of a woman in the Igbo world: ‘It’s true that a child belongs to its father. But when a father beats his child, it seeks sympathy in its mother’s hut. A man belongs to his fatherland when things are good and life is sweet. But when there is sorrow and bitterness he finds refuge in his motherland. Your mother is there to protect you. She is buried there. And that is why we say that mother is supreme.’ (Chapter 14, page 32)

It’s sadly preposterous that Adichie examines this same culture and finds nothing else but its imaginary disregard for girls and women. There was the 1929 Aba Women’s Riot—famous for its cause as for its unprecedented timing—during which Igbo women repudiated the high taxation by the British imperialists, as well as sacked the puppet Warrant Chiefs. It would take another fifty years for most European women to exercise any political right or vote in an election. It is therefore factually wrong and intellectually misleading to think of these as disempowered women. The history books are available and these facts stand on their own.

***

Adichie’s attack on fellow African females with regard to their use of western-inspired artificial hair was expected to provoke, and in turn help, book sales. But her feminist speech was also expected to soothe and boost the egos, not only of those same wounded African females, but of an entire category of women the world over, again stimulating book sales. The game being played here cannot escape detection by one with a decent, sensitive mind. ‘I hurt you with my hair attack. Here’s a feminist speech to prove my remorse.’ It doesn’t matter which of these cards—‘the hair’ and ‘the feminist’—was dealt first. What matters is that both cards were crafted by the same business-oriented mind-set, and at right about the same period.
 
At any rate, it seems evident that Adichie does not enjoy a lot of personal peace and happiness. This bug might reveal its presence by turning its host into a pointlessly petty and compulsively argumentative human. And that’s where the second vacuum comes in. Writing is a solitary and compulsive work. The writer should therefore be wise enough to realise the need to find personalised ways to stay emotionally and mentally balanced. The lack of balance is impossible to conceal, although Adichie doesn’t seem to have realised this. Her writing, speeches, interviews, all come together to give her away as lacking personal peace and happiness, i.e. balance. It really doesn’t matter how many times she says with emphasis that she’s a happy feminist. Humans know happiness when they see it, and therefore need not be reminded or cajoled. This is a vacuum of ‘personal peace and happiness’, and as with the first vacuum, good friends and a partner could help her find a solution. Not those that would do her bidding, but who are fulfilled and intelligent and would advise her sincerely.

In the global male camp it is widely believed that a womaniser or player is very often—not always but more often than not—a natural romantic so unlucky to have found himself in a wrong society, with regard to courtship culture. By the same or similar token, one is tempted to think that feminists—African ones particularly—tend to resemble not the most physically attractive of women, and therefore not the most chased and glorified by men. There are tens of reasons to authenticate my thesis, but I’ll submit one and advance: African feminist writers of these times all have this thing in common—the obsessive creation of weak male characters, whom they perversely ridicule with their writerly skills, and then defeat. One senses the urgency of this desire when reading their work, to beat the male figure down, trample on him, and then spread their legs and pee upon him. This is a favourite tactic of Adichie in her writing, and two other African female feminists come promptly to mind; one from Zimbabwe and the other from South Africa. It’s for them a natural goal. And when Adichie nags, endlessly, that ‘the light-skinned female’ is always chosen over her ‘dark-skinned equal’ in the pop culture, it becomes all but obvious why there is all the anger and hatred. A sizeable amount of black women argue that it’s the white community which forced them—through brainwashing—to hate their natural hair and prefer artificial extensions. It now seems like we have another group of black women eager to propose that the pop culture—apparently white-funded as well—be held accountable for the fast-growing epidemic of skin-bleaching, damaging many a black woman body-and-soul.

***

Enter the third vacuum—having to do with an identity crisis stemming from an early migration. In other words, this is where Adichie’s moving from Nigeria to the US at 19 becomes germane. As a person who moved to Finland at age 20, I can sympathise with her struggle to balance between both worlds. The aforementioned writer, Teju Cole, is a perfect example of how a young Nigerian emigrant could rediscover home in an ideal manner and with the priceless help of a full integration in one’s adopted home—in this case the US. He’s able to articulate such challenges with better prose, more depth, and an enviable honesty. Unlike Adichie, you can sense that Mr Cole is sensitive and genuine, and therefore fully human. Where Adichie tries to appear tough and mannish and anything else but sensitive and feminine, Mr Cole enlightens with humility and asks for nothing in return.

And here’s a mini moment of bliss: The thing with a full integration is that while it may distance you from the peoples and ways of your original homeland, it equally forbids you to export nonsense from your new homeland to your original homeland—because you know better. And it’s worth noting that the West always chose its colonial officers taking into account the abilities of the candidates to read, correctly, the black man’s psyche and culture! Or else the words of Frederick Lugard and the like, in describing Africans, wouldn’t remain so timelessly disquieting.

***

I should like to conclude this presentation by dealing conclusively with the feminist component of the bulk. I open by observing that Adichie’s assault on our Igbo culture has been anything but appealing.

I know for a fact that African feminists qualify as the worst globally—the least informed, specifically. And I’m not very surprised by this truth, given that they try to copy a Western ideology they know practically nothing about. Not long ago I tried having a conversation on feminism with a black South African feminist—herself a writer just like Adichie. She was incapable of submitting a single point that was valid. In the end she gave a miserable example of a girl in rural South Africa who, on her way to school, has to stop at a river to wash herself because she isn’t furnished with sanitary pads by her parents. When I asked whether this was a case of gender inequality or plain poverty, she responded by exiting the conversation.

Although I never took Adichie seriously from the get-go, a certain reaction of hers did put the final nail in the coffin as far as my assessment of her opinions goes. That ultimate event took place very close to where I live, in Sweden precisely. Adichie was visiting a gathering there, and when a member of the audience asked for her judgment of the Swedish society and people, she answered that she hadn’t been very impressed. Her reason was that as she struggled with multiple bags in a hotel elevator, citizens stood by and watched who could have helped or simply offered to assist her. Such a thing wouldn’t have happened in her beloved Nigeria, she said.

The guests were unimpressed with her reaction, and I quickly discerned her misguided belief in eating her cake and having it too. Adichie is ignorant of the unnerving truism that in the genuinely feminist countries, like up here in Scandinavia, women and men cater to their own needs and nobody gives a real damn about anybody. How does she expect to be a hard-core feminist and still want other humans to assist her in carrying her bags? Seeing that particular video clip, I knew immediately of her unfamiliarity with the fact that at the very core of the idea of feminism, lies the most advanced form of selfishness the world has ever known.

Feminism has been my reality for all of my adult life. Well over ninety per cent of Scandinavian females are inherently feminist—it’s our rule, not the exception—so I do know what I speak of. And so if we agree that feminism typically starts out as a journey, then it’s accurate to indicate that Scandinavia has long reached the final destination of that journey. The simple facts of life up here, which I’ll now present and of which Adichie and her fellow African feminists appear to be unaware, should enable the very same Africans, who’ve been under her constant onslaught, to envisage their society’s future if they should be gullible enough to toe the feminist line.

The women of Finland were the first in the entire world to be granted the ballot. The year was 1906. Norway followed in 1913. And then Denmark and Iceland in 1915. But one can always juxtapose for the purposes of clarity. On August 26, 1920—fourteen years after Finland did it—the 19th Amendment granted the ballot to American women. In February 1918 British women over the age of 30 received the right to vote, but suffrage rights for men and women were not equalised before 1928 in that country my Nigerian compatriots think is their God—that’s 22 years after Finland took the step. France was in 1944. Belgium, Italy, Romania, and Yugoslavia were in 1946. Switzerland was only in 1971—and that’s six years before Adichie was born—while Liechtenstein, a country in the very heart of Europe, had to wait until 1984, my year of birth.

Approaching independence, both the men and the women of Nigeria voted jointly in 1951—and it was the first time for each of the sexes. In other words, there was never a time in the history of Nigeria when only men were allowed to vote. I should also emphasise that Nigerian women were 20 years ahead of their Swiss equals.

As a people who initiated feminism and have finally arrived at the journey’s final destination—a state of existence completely unimaginable to the likes of Adichie—this is how we live as Scandinavians:

1.    There is no chivalry left in the land. Men open doors for themselves. Women open for themselves. Anything other than that is foreign and the exception, not the rule.

2.    Men pay their bills. Women pay theirs. A couple visits a café, the man pays for his coffee and the lady pays for hers. Anything other than that is foreign and the exception, not the rule.

3.    Men do not compliment women. Instead, because men and women are engaged in an eternal battle for equality, each party expects to be complimented. Anything other than that is foreign and the exception, not the rule.

4.    Like the French and the Germans jointly told Britain when that island nation pushed to renegotiate its EU membership conditions: The European Union as an organisation isn’t an à la carte setting where one enters and decides what to take and what to omit. You either are fully in, or fully out. Put differently: there’s no such thing as cherry picking when attempting to adopt feminism. You can’t say ‘I want that aspect of it, but not the other one’. It is and will always be a chain of realities—imperceptibly linked—and once you try securing an element, be sure to welcome the rest which will inevitably follow.

5.    We Scandinavians have championed the feminist cause since time immemorial. Still, our women over here have yet to invent anything beyond roadside hair salons. The national innovation coffers are accessible to both sexes equally. But it’s the men who continue to invent and innovate and help this region maintain its spot as the leading innovator globally. That’s to say that there is no proof that feminism could turn women into the world’s top inventors of things and founders of top companies. The reality in Finland, after one hundred years of feminism and equal opportunities, is that men alone still found the major companies whose taxes take care of the nation, and when such firms employ women it isn’t purely for their skills but also for the sake of diversity.

6.    Unfortunate rivalry or war between the sexes is big in our homes and workplaces.

7.    Our families are often broken and passionate love is now foreign or the exception.

8.    It’s not uncommon for our children to be victimised by battling parents, and for them to be eventually raised by the government.

9.    We no longer make enough offspring to perpetuate our civilisation.

10.   And finally: there is little to zero love, kindness, and humaneness left around here. We seem to have stifled all of it with the warring energy we’ve been emitting for the past hundred years. This was the reason nobody thought it necessary to assist Adichie in carrying her bags in Sweden. Any citizen who argues the opposite is either delusional or merely lying.

I’m wrapping up and probing: Do I enjoy having such a gloomy reality as a member of the Finnish society? I certainly don’t. Can I live with it? I have been living with it and am now very used to having it as my reality. But would I like to see the same system replicated in Nigeria—my first country? The answer is a strong no. Tellingly, when Adichie was then asked in Sweden about how she sees Nigeria evolving and the sort of society it might eventually become; she answered that she hopes it evolves into its own kind of society and doesn’t resemble the Swedish one. Rather shamefully, this was the same Adichie who fights tooth and nail to export Scandinavia’s feminism to that same beloved Nigeria—her only refuge, my only refuge, from the madness of our joint Western existence. And she’s eager to wreak havoc over there in Nigeria with her tireless presentation of impulsive sermons, keen to upset the balance, and one suspects it’s also because she’s desperate to sell more books—at the expense of her own people’s lives and happiness now and later.

Another mini moment of bliss: Books like ‘The Twilight series’, ‘The Harry Potter series’, ‘The Fifty Shades trilogy’, ‘PS, I Love You’, were all written by women of our times. But how come we rarely hear of these women and their socio-political opinions? It surely has to be for the truism that a sophisticated human is first and foremost humbled by their success. And such humbleness (which in essence is ‘sincere gratitude’) is best expressed by one’s actions as opposed to their potentially bogus words. Therefore these women—despite their individual top tier achievements dwarfing Adichie’s rather seriously—lead their private and professional lives with a grace that compels the stranger to reckon, even from afar, that these achievers are surrounded by the right set of people.

As I indicated in my subtitle, this is not a politically correct presentation. And so I’ll go ahead to remark that according to my Igbo culture, when a woman goes about town or country acting out of control and spewing sheer arrogance as has been the case with Adichie the writer, sensible adults tend to point fingers of blame at one ultimate culprit—a vacuum—and it specifically has to do with the absence of a real man in the woman’s life, either as a strong father figure, or as a strong and influential brother or partner. One could say ‘husband’ instead of ‘partner’ if they will. (And I add that this fourth is also the final vacuum.)

Of her name-changing declaration—i.e. ‘Nobody can force me to change my surname’—a Nigerian commented thusly on social media: ‘I have known Adichie to be an idiot! I don’t blame her; her husband’s name doesn’t open doors.’ Indeed, faceless strangers could be more sensitive and sharp-eyed than we give them credit for. But how Adichie has brought herself so low would baffle any observant mind. Because Nigerians are now logically tearing her apart, and I should add, in a style they very much relish.

Otherwise stated: the Igbo, my people of south-eastern Nigeria, understand that nature abhors a vacuum—a favourite philosophy of my good friend, Mitterand Okorie. It’s also a universal knowledge that a woman is, by nature, ever ready to become exploitative once the man slacks. The relationship between a man and a woman, for those who know better, is therefore a never-ending game of the mind and emotions. I hasten to add that the urge to take advantage of a man or of the vacuum he allowed when he relaxed and stopped being the man, is even larger and much wilder in a black woman’s frame. An African-American comedian once joked that ‘Once a sister makes 9 dollars an hour, she thinks she’s Oprah’—id est she becomes impossible to handle or be with. Meaning that it’s hard, evidently, for most black women to be both successful and classy. Again, since most Nigerians wrongly understand ‘class’ to mean ‘fancy and flashy physical appearance’ I should mention for a second time that in the international sense—the correct sense—‘class’ stands for ‘tact and sophistication of the mind’. I speak here of that correct meaning of class. Can you be equally successful and humble? Can you be successful and still recognise the value of class, embracing it fittingly? Can you be trusted? It seems the temptation of acting crassly and harshly never ever vacates the black woman’s space—more so once she has had a taste of some professional success. 

Why else did Adichie choose to address the grown men vying for the Caine Prize as ‘my boys’—with no pun intended—the very height of arrogance and tactlessness! And we all saw the writers, to whom she referred, fighting back. The decisive verdict is this: In the international field of courtship, the Black woman is purely not the most attractive option, because Asian women, White women, Arab women, Hispanics, would fare much better. It’s no wonder then that black men—where they are presented with options—may increasingly feel tempted to date outside their communities. These are interesting times. And happy people with class don’t explain their choices to the world.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Killing Buhari By Rudolf Ogoo Okonkwo

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Read Time:8 Minute, 52 Second
  On Friday, November 22, 1963, while riding along with a presidential motorcade on a street in Dallas, Texas, US President, John F. Kennedy, was shot by a sniper. Kennedy was sitting inside a Lincoln Continental convertible with his wife, Jacqueline, Texas Governor John Connally, and Connally’s wife, Nellie, when the bullets from Lee Harvey Oswald’s high-powered rifle flew in. Oswald was arrested seven hours later in a Texas theater. Two days after, while Oswald was being escorted to a car for transfer to Dallas County jail, he was shot in front of live TV cameras by Jack Ruby, a night club owner. 

It was the dark days of American politics when the nation was embroiled in a Cold War and a devastating war in Vietnam. As details of Kennedy’s assassination emerged, so did conspiracies that laid the blame on the CIA, the Soviet Union, organized crime, the Secret Service, Vice-President Lyndon Johnson, the KGB, military industrial complex, right-wing groups and so on. At issue was that Americans could not believe that a drifter like Oswald killed a whole president of the United States. Not even the Warren Commission could put the controversy to rest after a ten-month investigation that concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when he killed Kennedy and that Jack Ruby acted alone when he killed Oswald. It did not balance out that a regular guy could just kill a president. And because it did not balance out there must be other intrigues hidden behind the headlines. There were questions about a second gun man, a mystery bullet and other circumstantial occurrences common in life.

Similar narratives are now playing out in Nigeria over the destruction being wrecked by Boko Haram on the nation. With almost 3,000 people killed this year alone, including the February slaughter of 29 school boys in Damaturu, one can still find Nigerians who doubt that the Boko Haram group actually kidnapped the over 200 Chibok school girls. 

And then came the Wednesday incidents in Kaduna.

Since December 31, 1983 when the junta that sacked the Second Republic made him the leader of the succeeding military government, Nigeria has been trying to kill General Muhamadu Buhari. 

Buhari is different things to different people. To some, he is the epitome of that group of generals who truncated our democracy under the pretense that they knew better than the rest of us on how to correct our maladies and put us on a different orbit.  To some, he is nothing but a member of the long ruling class from the privileged part of Northern Nigeria. To others, he is one of the few actors in Nigeria willing to wipe out corruption and all the allied ills wrecking the country. There are those who see him as an Islamic fundamentalist eager to turn Nigeria into an Islamic country. Some see him as one of those born before Nigeria gained independence in 1960 who have held tight to the leadership of the country ever since and won’t hand over to the next generation. Whatever he is to you, there are people who are willing to kill him for that.

The event that happened on Wednesday last week in Kaduna was just a physical manifestation of something that has been going on, figuratively, for over three decades.

As we speak, the event of last Wednesday is being debated. The only thing Nigerians can agree on is that there was a bombing. Who planned it and for what purpose have divided Nigerians. Some believe, including Buhari himself, that it was Boko Haram. But which Boko Haram? The political Boko Haram, the criminal Boko Haram or the religious Boko Haram? And for what goal? 

Some believe it was a bogus attempt planned by Buhari or the APC to erase the perception in some quarters that Buhari and the APC are the sponsors of Boko Haram. Amongst the distinguished men who believe this narrative is the Niger-Delta militant, Asari-Dokubo. 

And then, there are those who believe that it was planned by President Goodluck Jonathan and the PDP to eliminate the most formidable opponent of their party in 2015 election. This is the most dangerous of all the theories. 

Everyone holds on to his or her own belief in spite of what the reality suggests. The reality is that Nigeria dodged a bullet on Wednesday. If Buhari and Sheik Dahiru Bauchi had been killed on Wednesday, several scenarios would have played themselves out. The least of which would be a sequence of unpleasant events that would have led to President Jonathan declaring an emergency rule across most of the North.  At the very least, it could have precipitated a military takeover of the government of Nigeria. 

Some would say, “That is not possible. The military can never rule Nigeria again.”  After you say so, look over to Egypt and ask them how they sacrificed blood and sweat only to go from a 30-year old dictatorship of a former military officer to starting another dictatorship of a former military officer.  The military that inherited the Egyptian revolution did not appear in a vacuum. And so it could have been if what happened on Wednesday had taken the life of Buhari. It would have been a series of unfortunate events that would have culminated in an end we did not envisage.

The reason isn’t that Buhari’s life is more important than the lives of those who have been killed in Nigeria in the past, including MKO Abiola. People who hold on to that notion to dismiss the danger in what happened on Wednesday are forgetting something important: the context. There have been some gathering clouds across the Nigerian sky before, but never has the elements come together in this way that a little trigger could lead to a perfect storm. In Nigeria today, the forces of evil lurking in Nigeria would easily overwhelm the system if pushed into the arena all at once. The forces are alert. The cracks on the nation’s core are wider than ever. The tremor will bring down the pillars. The forces are so potent that the perfect storm could happen as early as tomorrow. 

It was therefore great that President Jonathan recognized this when he said on Sunday that Nigeria would have been in turmoil had Buhari and Bauchi died in the attacks. But contrary to what the president said, there is nothing to celebrate in Buhari’s narrow escape. With scores of Nigerians killed each day, the next question for the president is what is he going to do about it? A country can dangle at the edge of the abyss for a while. If it stays there for too long, eventually, it will ultimately break and fall in.

Instead of focusing on these realities, Nigerians are engrossed in their new found game: conspiracy bating. We can even say that Nigeria has officially adopted a new religion. It is called conspiracy theory. The intellectual space of Nigeria has been overtaken by the weed of conspiracies. It is the final stage of a society that is submerged in darkness.

Considering the depth of the darkness in which we have been wallowing in for years, it is easy to understand why it’s difficult for us to think outside the box. We are boxed inside a terrifying world of crude intrigues and betrayals. The acts are often so simple and the motives so mundane that we don’t believe what they are pointing to. We want to believe there are higher meaning and deeper depth to things. And when the meanings are higher and the depth deeper, we wish to hold on to the simplified interpretation of things. In Nigeria today, those ‘who are not lost in the understanding of their confusion are lost in the confusion of their understanding.’

But it should not be surprising. Our experiences come from the things that have happened to us. Our prejudices come from our fears. We assign motives to other people’s words and actions based on our prejudices. We interpret our experiences to support our prejudices. We choose a social circle that reinforces our prejudices. In the end, our prejudices taint our judgment. We cannot break out of this quagmire until we learn to examine motives outside the scope of our prejudices. 
  
A man who has readied an army of fighters eager to make the nation ungovernable will not grab a microphone and announce it. When Bola Tinubu talked about roasting anyone who would try to rig the gubernatorial election in Ekiti, he did not have an army of men with kerosene and firewood ready to roast people. It was a foolish talk by a politician wary of possible rigging of an election.

We can fail in the task of uplifting our society. We can equally fail in the task of inspiring the young. But we cannot fail in the task of preserving rational thinking. The consequences of such a failure would be devastating. Our demise will not happen because some mad men are killing us. We will finally get our acts together and vanquish the mad men. We will become extinct when our minds fail us or become so crowded with proliferating conspiracies that reason eludes us.

Looking at the trend in our democracy of today, would an uninterrupted democracy since 1979, in spite of Umaru Dikko and Adisa Akinloye and others, have led us to somewhere better? If we eliminate corruption in Nigeria, would all the other ills and injustices be easily resolved? Despite suggestions of some on the fringe, is it practical for any group to Islamize all of Nigeria? Has the control of power been in the hands of the elite of a particular ethnic group for so long in Nigeria that they have assumed that it is their right? When will the generation that came into prominence during the colonial era give way to those born after independence? Fair or not, Buhari’s name, as well as his essence, is mentioned in an attempt to answer any of these questions and many more of the Nigerian questions.

We can keep trying to kill Buhari for the simple reason that we have used our tongue to count our teeth. With Buhari, dead or alive, Nigeria will continue on its tragic trajectory until we use our teeth to count our tongue.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Insurgency: Call Off Your Summer Break, HURIWA Tells N’Assembly

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Read Time:3 Minute, 0 Second

Human Rights Writers Association of Nigeria (HURIWA), a pro-democracy non-governmental organisation, has criticised as ruthless and reckless the decision by the National Assembly to proceed on prolonged summer break at this precarious period of the highest manifestation of insecurity and anarchy across northern Nigeria.

It therefore urged the hierarchy of the national legislature to call off the unwarranted annual recess and partner the central government to tackle the rising security nightmares.

The rights group also called on President Goodluck Jonathan to set up a national war council with the onerous task of mobilising all law abiding Nigerians to brace up to face the unprecedented security challenges foisted on the nation by the armed terrorists terrorising the country even as it has for the umpteenth time appealed to the federal government to liberalise the process of acquisition of arms by citizens deemed mentally sound and free from criminal activities.

This measure, the group said, would enhance the right to life, especially of villagers in the frontline of the counter insurgency war who have borne the highest brunt of the murderous attacks by insurgents.

In a statement issued in reaction to heightened state of insecurity in North-east and North-west Nigeria and the increasing state of anxiety among residents of the nation’s capital, who are apprehensive of threats of terror attacks by the armed Islamic terrorists, HURIWA through the National Coordinator, Comrade Emmanuel Onwubiko and the National Media Affairs Director, Miss Zainab Yusuf, said it was cruel, heartless and uncaring for the national legislators and their immediate family members to jet out on public expense in the name of summer break to Europe and choice tourists sites in the United States at this time, while most law abiding citizens are bombarded by the systematic and murderous attacks by armed terrorist.

Comparing the current summer recess by the National Assembly to comprehensive dereliction of constitutional duty by the legislators, the rights group said it was regrettable that since 2011 when the insurgency became unprecedented, the National Assembly had failed abysmally to explore the use of section 220[1] and [2] of the 1999 constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria as amended, which permits compulsory military training for citizens to fashion out more creative and effective panacea to the rising gruesome killings of Nigerians by armed insurgents or even make law to liberalise weapons’ ownership to check the rising cases of genocidal killings of villagers by gun-wielding armed terrorists.

Citing the failure of the National Assembly to attend to the pending request by President Jonathan for a foreign credit facility to procure necessary combat infrastructure to battle insurgency, the rights group said, “Although we have made our position known regarding the request for $1 billion loan demand by the federal government to enhance the counter terrorism war in which we proffered alternative internal funding mechanism rather than foreign loan to fight the current anti-terror war, but by not attending to the pending request by the Presidency for whatever it is worth has showed the members of the National Assembly as lacking the necessary comprehensive apprehension of the extent of threats against the sovereignty of Nigeria
The National Assembly, it said, ought to be on seat by now to even create other extra constitutional means of tackling the increased challenges of insecurity posed by the armed insurgents as this is not the time for merry-making summer holiday, but a perilous time that demands that all patriotic hands must be on the deck to workout realistic and effective solution to the spiraling violence.”

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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NIGERIA: Akpabio Charges Christians on Forgiveness

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Read Time:2 Minute, 33 Second

Governor Godswill Akpabio of Akwa Ibom State has charged Christians in the country to always have the heart of forgiveness towards one  an other because God is love.

Akpabio gave the charge on Sunday during the thanksgiving service of the 50th birthday celebration of the state Commissioner for Special Duties, Mr. Emmanuel Enoidem, with the theme, “Celebrating God’s Exceeding Grace’, at Power City International Church, Uyo, the state capital.

He remarked that, “For those of us who are going somewhere in life, we must learn to forgive. We must always have the heart of forgiveness because God is love, and any position we find ourselves, we should always leave it better than when we met it”.

Congratulating Enoidem, Akpabio remarked, “I thank God for the life of the celebrant, and we are all gathered here today to rejoice with him. The celebrant has a good heart, and he is a hardworking and very dedicated and a result-oriented personality. Through his education, light has come into his entire family because when God is in someone, he will always be lightened up in touching the lives of the people, which he has done through electricity and good road in his village”.

The Governor stressed that the leadership of government is in the power of God’s grace, and charged the people of the state that in any position they find themselves, they must always endeavour to leave it better than they met it.
He then appreciated the Power City International Church’s Senior Pastor, Damina and wife for being great spiritual mentors to the people of the state and called on the youths and members of the church to tap into the source of greatness and the blessings of the man of God.

Pastor Damina, who preached on the topic, “The Supernatural Church’, said the church of God was born supernatural since the days of Pentecost in the Bible, pointing out that the mission of God was for children of God to function in the supernatural, which he stressed that the supernatural signifies the realm of God.

Damina said one couldn’t function ordinarily in that realm if one is not born supernaturally, disclosing that with the corruption in the world, one can escape it when one have the nature of God and carries God on the inside, stressing that faith produce supernatural things and that every born again Christian is given a measure of faith.

The celebrator, Enoidem, disclosed that the history of his life characterised by the exceeding grace of God, which he said he wasn’t even qualified for, stressing that education is the bedrock for what he has now become in life and that his wife and family are the pillar and inspiration of his life.

He commended Governor Akpabio for his developmental strides in the state, stressing that he is one of the great supporters of the Akpabio’s administration and pledged his continued service with the Governor.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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NIGERIA: Child Abductors in Akwa Ibom to Face Death Sentence

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Read Time:3 Minute, 51 Second

 Henceforth, any person who abducts a child in Akwa Ibom State will face death sentence like a kidnapper under the state child’s rights and anti-terrorism law.

Already, 25 persons arrested for alleged child abduction by security agents in the state are to face trial while 30 kidnapped children from the state and some neighbouring states had been rescued.

The state Governor, Chief Godwill Akpabio, who stated this at  the thanksgiving service to mark the 50th birthday celebration of the state Commissioner for Special Duties, Mr. Emmanuel Enoidem, at Power City International, Uyo, remarked that the convicts would face death sentence like hardened criminals.

According to him, the trauma parents go through in such incident is always heart breaking, and promised that every child abductor would be brought to book.
He then called on the people of the state to report any suspicious movement to security agencies and to always be security conscious at all times, hinting that five teams of security agencies are carrying out investigation to check child theft in the state.

The celebrant, Enoidem, disclosed that the history of his life characterised  by the exceeding grace of God, which he said he wasn’t even qualified for, stressing that education is the bedrock for what he has now become in life and that his wife and family are the pillar and inspiration of his life.

In his sermon, Pastor Abel Damina, who preached on the topic: “The Supernatural Church’, said the church of God was born supernatural since the days of Pentecost in the bible, pointing out that the mission of God was for children of God to function in the supernatural, which he stressed that the supernatural signifies the realm of God.

Later at a grand reception organised for Enoidem at Ibom Hall grounds, Uyo, the governor warned teachers to desist from abusing school children in the state  because offenders would face stiff punishment,  pointing out “We have made direct phone numbers available to school children and their parents so that they can call or send text messages and report any molestation.
“I assure them that I will not only punish the teacher in question through dismissal, I will also punish the principal of the school if it comes to my notice that the principal did not take action to stop the child from being molested. Parents, take care of your wards and ensure that they are not abused and taken into child labour and trafficking.”

Akpabio, however, described Enoidem as a man with abundant initiative, who only report results and not efforts, and advised leaders at various levels to borrow a leaf from the commissioner, saying: “For some of you who have the chance to be managers of resources for the tate, try and develop initiatives, have it in abundance and then move the state from one point to another.”

He reminded the people that the Akwa Ibom State today is not Akwa Ibom of yesterday, noting “We should bear one thing in mind that Akwa Ibom of 2006 is not the Akwa Ibom of today because the state has changed and there are a lot of things that require sustainability. There are a lot of things that we must sustain.

“We must sustain the free and compulsory education programme for our children, we must sustain the operation zero potholes in the state, we must maintain the three hotels in the state, we must attract people to the state; the conference must continue, that means we must secure the state and make possible for people to come in from all part of the world into the State, they must see Akwa Ibom State as the Oasis of peace, we must love one another,” he maintained.

Earlier, Enoidem who had thanked God for His faithfulness to him and his family and Governor Akpabio for giving him the opportunity to serve in the State Executive Council recounted God’s faithfulness to him for seven years as a member of the State Executive Council.

Enoidem, who thanked Akpabio for the development of the state, pledged his continued loyalty to his administration, saying “I will not disrespect you; I will not disappoint you, not as a governor or as brother or as the senator that you are going to be.  You have done well for Akwa Ibom State and I believe God is going to reward with a successor. I can compare notes with the previous government and I can say that you are good man.” 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Jonathan’s supporters may be behind Buhari’s attack- Joe Igbokwe

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Read Time:1 Minute, 54 Second

The Publicity Secretary of the All Progressives Congress in Lagos, Mr. Joe Igbokwe, has said although President Goodluck Jonathan may not have been involved in the attempt on the life of a former Head of State, Maj.Gen Muhammadu Buhari (retd.), the assailants may be Jonathan’s sympathisers. He subsequently urged the Federal Government to carry out a comprehensive investigation as the attempt on Buhari’s life might be connected to the 2015 general elections.
 

Igbokwe said this in a write-up titled, “Who Wants General Buhari Dead?”

He said had the assassination attempt been successful, it would have become easy for Jonathan to win next year’s election.
He recalled that a former National Security Adviser, General Owoye Azazi (retd.), once said that the Boko Haram crisis was a fallout from the zoning debacle in the Peoples Democratic Party.
He warned the Federal Government to revisit Azazi’s theory as this could go a long way in addressing the security situation in the country.
 
He said, “I am running away with the thinking that the crisis bedevilling the nation cannot be divorced from President Jonathan’s ambition to rule Nigeria beyond 2015. While this inordinate ambition is being pursued left and right, front and back, up and down, the nation is left bare at the mercy of insurgents, and mass murderers.
 
“If the truth must be told, Nigeria has to remain a political entity for somebody to become the President. President Jonathan should look inwards pronto. Those who targeted Gen Buhari may be playing real politics for President Jonathan’s 2015 ambition. It may be right to push the blame to Boko Haram but nobody is a political idiot here.
“All things considered, General Buhari remains the greatest threat to President Jonathan’s ambition in 2015 and the handlers of Mr. President know this very well. Once Buhari is out of the way then it is a walkover for the President. But one basic truth is self-evident here: General Buhari of 2003, 2007, and 2011 is no longer the same Buhari. Time, space, and history has strategically positioned the man differently today and woe betides anybody who will not see the difference.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Ondo: Emergency Medical Service Takes Off

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Read Time:1 Minute, 45 Second

The Ondo State government has announced the readiness of its Emergency Medical Service Agency to commence operation across the state, even as training has begun in earnest for officers in charge of the agency.

Briefing  journalists in Akure yesterday, the state Commissioner for Information, Kayode Akinmade said the agency would begin full operation as soon as the officers are through with their training.

According to Akinmade, the state Commissioner for Health, Dr. Dayo Adeyanju, had, before the Ramadan holiday, declared open training for the officers who are expected to work at the five strategic locations of the agency in the state.

The locations, he said, are Ikare–Akoko, Owo, Bolorunduro, Ilara and Ore, where the medical team would be available and could be contacted for any emergency medical situation.

Akinmade said the Medical Service Agency would begin full operation as soon as the officers are done with their training this week.

“It’s a refresher course basically and those undergoing the training are paramedics, rescue teams, corpse dispatchers and ambulance drivers,” Akinmade said, adding that all other logistics for smooth operations are already in place.
He said the officers had been trained to ensure that the programme callers are attended to immediately.

“Before the various telephone numbers of the teams are released to the public, the facilities would be tested with all the stakeholders such as members of the National Union of Road Transport Workers, officials of the Federal Road Safety commission, commercial motorcycle Riders and members of Road Transport Employers Association of Nigeria among others,” Akinmade said even as he charged all stakeholders to collaborate with the officers of the agency to make its set objective realisable.

According to the Commissioner, the operation of the agency is one of the rescue measures being put in place by the state government to save lives, especially accident victims across the state.

He said most accident victims die due to lack of timely medical attention but however announced that, “with the agency in place, the situation will change and lives would be preserved.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Boko Haram: Women Lawyers Decry Increasing Widowhood in Nigeria

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Read Time:2 Minute, 29 Second

International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA) has tasked President Goodluck Jonathan to deploy all energies to halt the activities of insurgents in the country.
The women organisation stated that  the trend of Boko Haram insurgents had indicated that women are the worst hit by the nefarious and senseless killings and kidnapping that had been carried out by the evil group.

In a chat with journalists in Ado-Ekiti yesterday, the chairperson of the body in Ekiti, Mrs. Rita Ilevbare, said the killing and maiming of innocent Nigerians through the dastardly activities of the Islamic militants had brought unprecedented sorrow to many women.

Ilevbare decried the rising wave of bomb explosions in the northern zone in recent time despite the declaration of emergency rule by the President Jonathan in three states in the northern part of the country.

She pointed out that the increased  level of widowhood among women owing to seemingly unabating terror  attacks  would further erode  the country’s family values, except  concerted steps are taken to forestall the persistent carnage under the guise of terrorism.

Ilevbare said: “Women  and children are always at the receiving end of any war and the one being experienced under Boko Haram insurgents cannot be an exception. This is simply because women have nowhere to run to. They would have to wait behind and defend their families, particularly their children even under a tense situation.

“We are mostly pissed off by the increasing level of bombing despite the emergency rule in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe States. The heavy presence of military personnel has not changed anything and this is not good for the system.
“The recent deaths in series of bombings in Kaduna affected mostly women while the one in Kano,  Adamawa and Borno had been frightening and making the future of this country look hopeless.

“With all these happenings, the federal government must change tactics in curtailing these evil doers to prevent further wailings and debasement of motherhood because this country is greater than any individual or group,” she advised.
Ilevbare also appealed to the men folk not to see the agitations for the recovery of the 238 Chibok girls as a women affairs, saying all Nigerians would have to consistently advocate for the release of the seized girls to bring happiness to all mothers across the globe.

The FIDA boss averred that “the seizure of these girls had assumed a global dimension to the effect that a globally acclaimed child rights activist, Malala, had to come to Nigeria to personally meet President Jonathan on the issue.

“With this, the advocacy has gone beyond the realm of gender. It is a battle for all of us because in recent time, only women organisations have consistently been holding protests  for the release of the girls. It is a battle for all Nigerians and not for women alone,” Ilevbare pointed out.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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NIGERIA: Calabar Monorail will Be Delivered on Time, Says Contractor

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Read Time:1 Minute, 44 Second

 The contractor handling the Calabar monorail project has promised to deliver it on schedule and according to specifications.

The Managing Director of Ponet, Mr. Hans Butcher, said work was progressing at predetermined pace.

He stated that the challenges of time and poor weather conditions as well as other elements would not affect the timely completion of the project as envisaged.

According to Hans, “the monorail, an electric powered passenger shuttle train comprising 10 passenger-cars and two equipment cars (total of 12 cars per train) and a 78 total seating capacity will soon be available at the Summit Hills to carter for the transportation needs of residents and visitors.”

He stressed that coaches and other vital components had been manufactured and ready for shipment from various parts of Europe. He also hinted that “the elevated monorail transport system is uniquely and beautifully designed to suit the eco system of Summit Hills as well as connect it with TINAPA Business and Leisurr Resort without compromising global standards in line with the state’s disposition on tourism development.”

On his past, the state Governor, Senator Liyel Imoke, has expressed his excitement as the ongoing construction of the monorail project progresses.
The monorail is designed to link the new development area called the Summit Hills where the new Calabar International Convention Centre is sited, to the TINAPA Business and Leisure Resort.

Speaking during an inspection of the project, Imoke said: “My vision to integrate TINAPA Business Resort which is about 12 kilometres away from Calabar via a monorail with the Convention Centre, both of which are separated by an artificial lake is progressively being realised.”

According to him, “the monorail will provide a wonderful opportunity for guests at the Tinapa Hotel and Tinapa Knowledge City to utilise conferencing facilities across the lake.”

Imoke who expressed satisfaction with the quality of work so far carried out, disclosed that “all the offshore components  of the project had been fully paid for and awaiting shipment into the country.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Muhammad Buhari Stage Assassination Attempt To His Life

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Read Time:3 Minute, 21 Second

INCREDIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  Muhammad Buhari Stage Assassination Attempt To His Life. it is another Chibok Scam !!!!!!!

On Wednesday July 23rd 2014, terrorists allegedly attempted to assassinate Muhammadu Buhari in Kaduna. The statement from The Buhari Organization had it that all the cars in the Buhari convoy were destroyed while three of his security aides suffered minor injuries. According to their reports, a Toyota Sienna had to be summoned to ferry Buhari out of the ground zero of the blast.
Curiously, a video of Muhammadu Buhari which was shot in the immediate aftermath of the bombing has surfaced.

It is surprising that traumatized survivors of a large scale terrorist bomb attack which killed tens of innocent bystanders had the presence of mind to film the immediate aftermath of the incidence and send it to media houses in Nigeria.

In the said video, Muhammadu Buhari appeared unhurt and looked composed as did those around him. The vehicle in the video appeared intact and showed no sign of damage in contradiction to their press statement. The only sign that it may have been involved in an attack such as was reported was a broken rear side window.

After this video was released, the Buhari Organization launched a whisper campaign spearheaded by Malam Nasir Elrufai, attempting to link the attack to Buhari's statement warning that the President had declared war on Nigeria which was published two days earlier.
The above facts call for a deeper investigation of the entire episode especially when it is coming less than two weeks after reports (published on July 12, 2014) that a Member of the British parliament, Mr. Andrew Rosindell, had asked the British Government to investigate links between the All Progressive Congress, APC, and the Boko Haram terror sect.

It may be recalled that 24 hours after Andrew Rosindell's call was published, the APC rushed out a knee jerk statement (published on July 13, 2014) calling for an international probe to unmask the identities of Boko Haram's sponsors.
Muhammadu Buhari has a history of playing the victim in order to deceive constituted authority. It is documented in former President Shehu Shagari’s book ‘Beckoned to Serve’ and in the memoirs of the late Solomon Lar, how Buhari was confronted with a security report alleging that he was ring leader of a coup plot against the Shagari regime. Buhari feigned being hurt almost to the point of tears. He told the then President that he was heartbroken and thus would resign his commission since Shagari had lost confidence in him. Shagari recounted that he was remorseful after this encounter with Buhari and apologized. He also ordered the investigation closed. Weeks after this encounter, Buhari toppled Shagari.

Interestingly, the security report was instigated by Shagari’s confidante, Umaru Dikko.
Buhari never forgot or forgave Dikko for that act.

Muhammadu Buhari’s mastery of subterfuge is well known in international intelligence circles as a result of the Umaru Dikko saga when a plot he personally hatched to kidnap Umaru Dikko, sedate him and crate him back to Nigeria was blown open by British intelligence. It would be recalled that Buhari was able to co opt former Mossad agents, Alexander Barak, Felix Abitbol and Dr Lev-Arie Shapiro into his plan. These men were arrested, tried and imprisoned when the plot was foiled. But the point remains that Buhari has the ability and the finances as well as the will to co opt rogue foreign intelligence officials into any plot he chooses to execute.
The recent attack on Muhammadu Buhari by suspected terrorists may well be what it appears to be on the surface. However, recent events, which show that the APC was rattled by Mr. Rosindell's call leaves strong room to suspect that the incidence may have been a false flag operation staged to deflect international suspicion that there are links between the APC and Boko a Haram.

Only a thorough investigation can unravel the truth.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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