Scam alert: Important General Notice – Do not ignore – Central Bank of Nigeria

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 Caution: this is a scam email. do not click the link.Please Report this immediately to EFCC. The scammer faked the site and attempting to trick you to submit your details . Do not do that . Below is the sample of such mail

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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N7.47 Billion Fraud – EFCC Appeals Against Martins

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Abuja — Arising from the decision of the F.C.T High Court Gudu, to discharge the coordinator of the defunct Police Equipment Foundation (PEF), Mr. Kenny Martins and three others of the criminal case filed against them, the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has appealed to Court of Appeal on grounds that the ruling is ‘unreasonable and unwarranted and cannot be supported having regard to the evidence’.
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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Scam email alert -Notification of Bequest -Scott Kennedy

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 Scam email- please be warned. if you have receive such attachment telling you to submit your details in order to be a beneficiary  to somebody you have never seen before. it is a scam. don’t fool yourself.  you should immediately delete this email.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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How impostors swindled families of Nigerians abroad

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Read Time:8 Minute, 1 Second
FRAUD is an intentional deception made for personal gain or to damage another individual. It is a crime and is also a civil law violation. Many fraud cases involve complicated financial transactions conducted mostly by business professionals with specialised knowledge and criminal intent.

Fraud can be committed through many methods, including mail, wire, phone, and the internet. Many scams use telephone calls to convince the victim that the person on the other end of the deal is a real, truthful person.

Many Nigerians have fallen victim of fraud one time or the other. Perhaps the version of the story differs from one victim to the other. The strange thing is that the victims are being defrauded by fellow Nigerians who take the advantage of the respect people have for their kith and kins living in foreign countries.

In the past, the trend was that Nigerians living abroad would send money for a specific project back home. Such people had been swindled many times. They were taught hard lessons, but they became wiser. They now know the “safe hands” to put their money in for any investments back home.

Sometime ago, a man was reported to be sending money home to his brother, who diverted the money, meant for a building construction for personal gain. Pictures of the ‘progress’ made on the work were continuously sent to the trusting fellow abroad until the lid was blown open. He was duped by his own brother!

However, with Nigerians abroad now exercising caution in their dealings with those they are supposed to trust, even relatives, those at home are being duped by people living in their present surroundings, but who claim to be relatives living in faraway countries.

According to a source, a middle-aged man recounted how he woke up on a fateful day to a call from abroad. The caller, using an international number, told him that his son, who was living abroad, had longed to speak with him.

“Your son (names withheld) had been trying your number before he left for office. Since he could not reach you on phone, he asked me to deliver his message,” the man quoted the caller to have said.

Asked how the caller got the details about his son, the man said, “the caller did not mention my son’s name. I gave him the details – his name, country and everything. I was so curious; has anything happened to my son?”

And the message: The son wanted the father to help him acquire a property in a choice area. A friend was arranged to take the man to see the property. The parent was careless. He did not call the son to confirm the development. He took the bait. The next day, he parted with about N500,000 (he was rich and he would do anything for his son) to acquire the so-called property.

On how he got to know he had been duped, the man said his son called later in the day. “I was expecting him to ask me about the latest development, but he did not say anything. I told him all that had happened, but my son said he had no knowledge of it,” the man said.

He decided to check on the ‘property’ the next day, but the number with which he was contacted was no more available.

Another reported case of such fraud involved a man who believed he was being contacted by a neighbour who had relocated abroad. The caller told him that he decided to partner with him based on his record of honesty and transparency and he would also transact a business on his behalf.

The neighbour was so eloquent that the victim did not suspect any foul play. The ‘neighbour’ had left a message also that the man should contact his business associates who had just arrived in Nigeria. The offer was juicy. The man was ready to parter with his former neighbour, but he was entering into a trap. He got involved in the deal. He filled forms and made bookings for the ‘products.’

For certain ‘goods’ the man was to deliver for his ‘neighbour,’ he was to part with about N2 million and pay a non-refundable fee of N150,000 to register for the business. But before the deal could be concluded, he got a call from the real neighbour, who told him to ‘play along’ so the syndicate could be arrested. However, the fraudsters could read the writing on the wall and so they quickly backed out, but not until their victim had parted with about N200,000.

With the latest Internet communication, fraudsters have updated their skills. Pictures of relatives and friends abroad are usually manipulated to perform their dastardly act. Chatting fora like Facebook and others also make their work much easier.

For men who love ‘anything in skirt,’ pictures of beautiful girls are being used to get at them. ‘The girls’ surf the net for addresses of men and then send them mails expressing an interest to begin a relationship with them.

How do the fraudsters get people’s phone numbers? How do they get accurate information about their victims before initiating any communication. Are ‘insiders’ (relatives or other people close to the victim) involved in their work? Like it was stated earlier in this writing, the fraudsters are mostly business professionals with specialised knowledge.

A Nigerian living in London, Kunmi, said the trend was not a new thing.“I have alerted everyone closer to me. I have means of communicating with them and if the need be for anyone to take action on my behalf, they will get across to me first. I don’t know what the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) is doing to check the situation,” he said.

Another Nigerian living in the Netherlands said it was the crave for quick wealth that made Nigerians to fall victim of such tricks.

When asked whether any of his relatives in Nigeria had fallen victim of such, he was quick to answer in the affirmative. He said he had warned members of his family to cross-check with him, any information supposedly coming from him before acting on it.

As copied from the Western Austrialia Ministry of Fair Trade’s e-zine Fair Bytes, here is a story of a fraud: “When I received an unsolicited e-mail from a son of a prominent Nigerian, asking for my assistance in retrieving $500 million for a 25 per cent reward, excitement raced through me. I requested more information. A second e-mail provided me with a Nigerian phone number. A purported Nigerian attorney told me that I would receive 20 installments of $25 million deposited into my bank account bi-weekly. All I needed to do was pay $25,000 in expenses and up-front fees.”

According to him, he believed he would soon be on the list of the richest people in the world! All he had to do was send money to these contacts, allowing them to pay for hotels, airfares, gifts, and processing fees.

For the $1,200 sent, he received a faxed copy of a Certificate of Ownership to $25 million. All faxes proudly displayed official signatures, stamps and seals.

A deposit of $32 million within 72 hours into his bank account would take place after he paid a membership fee of $75,000 to join the "Secret Bank." He could have an immediate release of up to $1 million within 24 hours after he had paid the fee and filed the application.

According to the victim, “I asked them to take a cheque, telling them that it will mature in 10 days, but they insisted they preferred cash. So, I travelled to meet them in London.

“There, they communicated by cell phones, and never provided a physical address for contact. We met in my hotel’s bar. They showed me 10 stacks of $100 bills. Each bill had a smudge on its face that I was told would prevent detection by a scanning device as it passed through customs. This money, plus two million more that was waiting in a security company's vault, would be mine within 24 hours if I would buy the special chemical needed to remove the smudges and pay the release fee for the other two million dollars.

“I asked to cut open one of the plastic-wrapped stacks of money so I could fan through it. I believed I saw 10 stacks of copy paper with a $100 bill topping each stack. They did not allow me a hands-on inspection!

“As I stalled for time, trying to find a suitable end to my investigation, a cellphone rang. The conversation was not for my ears, but due to the loud, panicky voice of the caller, I could not miss her words: ‘Where’s my money!”

This was the voice of a woman who was recently duped and was threatening to have her money back from the contacts, and as such, the man knew it was a game and he sought ways of escape for himself.

The next time you get calls from abroad supposedly from families and friends, be sure you are talking with the right person, otherwise, you might be on the way to getting duped.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Scam Alert -YOU ARE ONE OF OUR WINNERS‏

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Scam Alert: This email is a scam. it claims you have won a lottery . do not fall for such a cheap scam. 

 Subject: NOKIA LOTTERY PROMOTION (demo@nbhy.com) 
NOKIA LOTTERY PROMOTION 2nd Floor Chiltern House, St Nicholas Court 25 - 27 Castlegate, Nottingham NG1 7AR, United Kingdom.  Dear Lucky Winner,   We happily announce to you the result of the Nokia Lottery draws held on Wednesday 24th June 2009, Lotto 6/49 in Essex, United Kingdom. All participants were selected randomly from World Wide Web site through computer draws system and extracted from over 10,000.00 companies and personal e-mail addresses.   Your e-mail address attached to ticket number: B9564 7560 with serial number 046560 drew the winning numbers 6 7 14 16 17 27 Bonus 32. You have therefore been approved to claim a total sum of L500,000.00 (FIVE HUNDRED THOUSAND POUNDS STERLING) in cash credited to file EAAL/9080118308/08.   To file for your claim, please contact our corresponding claim agent immediately you read this message for quick and urgent release of your fund.   Contact information is as follow:    Mr. James David Email: nokiaclaims@administrativos.com Phone Number: +447031998777       Endeavour to submit the below information’s as stated below to enable Mr. James David process your winning.   1. Full Name:................................ 2. Full Address:............................. 3. Marital Statue:........................... 4. Occupation:............................... 5. Age:...................................... 6. Sex:...................................... 7. Nationality:.............................. 8. Tel. Number:.............................. 9. Country of Residence......................   ***Due to possible mix up of some numbers and email contacts, we ask that you keep this award strictly from public notice until your claim has been processed and your money remitted. This is part of our security protocol to avoid double claiming or unscrupulous acts by some participants of this program. ***   Congratulations once more from all members and staff of this Lottery program.   Yours Sincerely, Nokia Lottery Promotion **Customer Service**

 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Scam email -Your account may have been accessed from an unauthorized computer

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Scam Alert – Be careful! this is a scam email that comes like a picture formatted letter requesting you to click and go to a fake site where the scammers will steal your bank details. please delete immediately

 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Protection against fraud – fraud watch

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Read Time:7 Minute, 22 Second

With the current fraudulent activities been perpetuated through internet and email. we have decided to  publish this paper to alert you  and also to warn you to be  careful not to enter into such scam. please read this carefully it will save you a lot pain.

MAJOR TYPES OF CARD FRAUD

   1. Phishing:

Phishing is the fraudulent process of attempting to acquire sensitive information such as usernames, passwords, Personal Identification Number (PIN) and debit card details by masquerading as a trustworthy company in an electronic communication.

Phishing is typically carried out by e-mail, text message(SMS) or instant messaging (yahoo chat, hotmail chat etc), and it often direct users to enter details on a fake websites that are almost identical (or sometimes identical) to the legitimate company.

The email is delivered to one’s inbox usually with the legitimate company’s email address (e.g. info@interswitchng.com). This is achieved by using a technique called spoofing.

E-mail spoofing is a term used to describe fraudulent e-mail activity in which the sender address and other parts of the e-mail header are altered to appear as though the e-mail originated from a different source. This is achieved by changing certain properties of the e-mail, such as the ‘From’, ‘Return-Path’ and ‘Reply-To fields’ (which can be found in the message header), ill-intentioned users can make the e-mail appear to be from someone other than the actual sender. The result is that, although the e-mail appears to have originated from the address indicated in the ‘From’ field (found in the e-mail headers) it actually comes from a fraudulent source. This is similar to forging the letter head paper of another company.

   2. Counterfeit Card Fraud:

This form of card fraud takes place when a card is printed, embossed or encoded without a card issuer’s permission. Most cases of counterfeit fraud involves the process know as skimming where the original data on a card’s magnetic stripe is copied onto another card without the legitimate cardholder’s knowledge.

In order to avoid your card being skimmed – BE VIGILANT. Never let your card out of your sight while paying for goods and services at any merchant location.

   3. Card-not-present (CNP) fraud:

This form of card fraud is committed mostly over the internet. Card details are gotten through the theft of card details such as PIN number, card number and expiry date from discarded receipts or by copying your card details when carrying out a transaction.

# Protecting Yourself Against Fraud
Protecting yourself can be as simple as keeping your eyes and ears open. Here are some steps to help keep your card information secure.
A.      Use Alerts

Some banks currently offer the option of receiving transaction alerts either on your mobile phone or email. This keeps you updated and on top of all your card activity or transactions.

InterSwitch has also gone a step further to include an automated card deactivation feature, meaning if you suspect that your card is being used fraudulently, this feature ensures the card is automatically blocked or deactivated. In other words, when an alert is received about a transaction you clearly did not initiate (or you are not sure of) you can block your card immediately by replying the text message.

Please ask your bank today for more information on MoneyGuard.

B.      CARD & PIN Safety – DOs & DONTs

    * DO
          o Report lost or stolen cards immediately.

          o Protect your debit, cash or Verve cards as if they were cash.

          o MEMORIZE your PIN – Never write down your PIN.

          o Ensure you change your PIN regularly at the ATM.

          o Ensure that you get your card back after every purchase either at a shop using a POS or at the ATM.

          o Ensure you keep copies of your vouchers and ATM receipts

    * DONT
          o Leave your ATM receipts at the point of withdrawal.

          o Lend anyone your debit card. You are solely responsible for its use. (Some debit card misuse can be traced directly to family and friends)

          o Ever use your PIN as a password.

          o Ever disclose your PIN to ANYONE.

          o Ever disclose your PIN to;

             o       Your Bank

             o       InterSwitch

             o       The  Telco’s ( e.g. Zain, MTN, Etisalat, Glo, Starcomms etc)

             o       The Police

             o       Shop owner

             o       Any company OR Person for whatever reason
                                    Please note that no one should ask for your PIN.

IT IS ILLEGAL FOR ANYONE TO ASK FOR YOUR PIN.

C.      Using the ATM Safely

Using your InterSwitch ATM card is a convenient and safe way to get cash. Just be sure to keep in mind the following safety tips:

o   Be vigilant

Avoid using ATMs in lowly lit or dark areas.

o   Guard your pin

Guard your P IN
always, always use your free hand to cover the keys as your PIN is being entered.

o   Be on the lookout for any suspicious actions, cancel all transactions and leave if you are suspicious of individuals around. 

o   Do not leave ATM receipts behind

Never leave your ATM receipts behind; your debit card details can be copied.

o   Do not accept help from strangers

Never accept help from strangers.

D.      Online safety

·         It is important to apply extra caution while on the internet.

·         Never send your PIN or card details in the body of an email.

·         Beware of emails asking for your PIN and card details they are false.

·         Before initiating online transactions be sure that the website has adequate security features to protect your debit card information.

·         Check InterSwitch web merchant partner list/page for the list of registered and certified merchants that are safe to purchase items from.

·         BEWARE of emails generally appearing to be from InterSwitch, your Bank or a Telecoms company either stating an upgrade on the network or requesting your PIN to claim prizes in a non existing ( or sometimes existing) promo. These emails are bogus; these companies will NEVER ask for your card details either for any upgrade or before you redeem prizes. BEWARE!

·         Avoid using public computer to shop online i.e. Cybercafé.

E.       Text message.

    * Ignore all text messages or SMS informing you that you have won a prize and you should go to the ATM to claim it.
      They are different gimmicks of fraudsters and are not genuine.

    * Never give your ATM card details or account information to anyone claiming to be from your bank OR Telecoms in order for you to redeem prizes.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Scam email – Account alert from interswitch® Nigeria

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 Scam alert – This is a scam. they claim to inform you to upgrade your details so that they can steal your private information. please be warned. see below the copy of their email. Remember no genuine bank will request you to put your private details through this con email. call your bank for further verification

From:"InterSwitch Nigeria Limited" <wildrose32736@verizon.net

To: undisclosed-recipients

Dear Customer,

We have upgraded our system of ATM card services to prevent ATM fraud.

You would have to apply for the upgrade on your ATM cards and Cashcards on our website:

http://pmcpantone.free.fr/InterSwitchNG.html or your ATM card access will be suspended within 48hrs.

Interswitch Nigeria LTD

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Scam email – security issues -Mosaik Mastercard

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Read Time:1 Minute, 3 Second

Scam intention – Beware this is a great scam. It appears to be another bank scam.   We received this email, and we don't have an account here, so we expect this to be another scam. They have created a mirror site and want to get your master card details for dubious purpose. never you give out your information to any site of this kind. Call your bank directly if you encounter problem. If you have received such email. please ignore it

Below is the template of their scam email

After three unsuccessful login attempts your account was temporary disabled until further investigations. All cards (except the temporary cards) from this account are suspended. BMO Bank of Montreal immediately, or you won't be able to use your cards again.

> Once you have completed these steps, we will send you an email notifying that your account is available again.
The information you provide us is all non-sensitive and anonymous – No part of it is handed down to any third party.

Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your patience.

This is the link to their fake website. Beware    http://cgw.metria-studio.ba.cust.gts.sk/selfserve/ 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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IMPORTANT – Access Suspended Halifax Plc

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Scam – Please be aware of this scam that request you to fill the bank form for accuracy. they are scammers who simple want to collect your information for dubious activities. This is the format of their email below

Subject : IMPORTANT – Access Suspended

Sender – Halifax Plc [securityservices@halifax.co.uk]

Dear Valued Customer,

Your access to Online Services has been suspended. Due to a miss-match access code between
your Security information. To enable you continue accessing your online account it will only
take you few minutes to re-activate your account. Click on the link below and you will be taken straight to where you can activate your account.

https://halifax-online.co.uk/_mem_bin/customer/formslogin.asp
Important Notice:- You are strictly advised to match your details correctly to avoid service denial.

Thank you for banking with us.

Kind Regards,
Halifax
Secure.

{linkr:related;keywords:scam;limit:5;title:Related Articles}

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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