HIV-Positive Student Videotaped Himself Having Sex With 31 People

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According to prosecutors, a 22-year-old college student secretly filmed himself having unprotected sex with as many as 31 people, knowingly exposing them to HIV.

In October, Michael Johnson, a student and former wrestler at Lindenwood University in Missouri, was charged with five felony counts of exposing partners to HIV. Some time later, police discovered the sex tapes—reportedly filmed with hidden cameras—stored on Johnson's laptop. Prosecutors disclosed the discovery on Friday.

"On that laptop were 32 videos engaged in sexual acts with Mr. Johnson," said Tim Lohmar, a St. Charles County prosecutor, told KMOV, adding that the tapes showed Johnson having sex with 31 partners over four months in his dorm at Lindenwood.

Lohmar also said that it's unlikely the partners knew about Johnson's HIV positive status.

Johnson, known online as Tiger Mandingo, met his partners—most of whom, if not all, were men—through his six social media accounts (three Facebook pages, two Twitter feeds, a Vine and an Instagram), according to the River Front Times.

If convicted, Johnson faces life in prison.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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FBI agents arrested Georgia man today for failing to enroll in Obamacare.

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Read Time:3 Minute, 18 Second

According to the Atlanta Times, Clint Bellwood, 28, of Sandy Springs was awoken at his home early Monday morning by a team of FBI agents and taken into custody.

Eyewitnesses say that Bellwood surrendered immediately, but the team nevertheless used excessive and even brutal force to implement the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate.

“They barged in with their guns drawn," explains his girlfriend Charlotte. "He put his hands up and they hit him in the head with the end of their assault rifles. He fell to the ground bleeding so I screamed and they Tased me.

"Then they handcuffed Clint. His arms were so far behind his back, I thought they were going to break his shoulders. They dragged him outside and I began to follow them. They put him into a black van. By the time I got outside the van had already sped off. So I went back inside and called the police.

"I can't believe what happened. He wanted to sign up for insurance, but the website was always down. He got a notice in the mail saying if he didn't sign up there would be consequences. But God, I didn't think it would be this bad."

This Might Sting A Little

The Affordable Care Act, popularly known as Obamacare, was passed in 2010 with the aim of extending health coverage to more Americans. It requires that individuals buy health insurance and provides subsidies to those who cannot afford the cost on their own.

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Although this individual mandate was upheld by the Supreme Court in 2012, it remains the law's most controversial provision, as it essentially criminalizes those who don't buy health insurance.

Bellword is currently being held at an undisclosed black site and has yet to be charged with a crime, implying President Obama has suspended habeas corpus in Affordable Care Act cases.

"All we know is that the FBI does indeed have him," the Sandy Springs police chief told the local media. "And we do not appreciate the federal government storming into our state and hauling away a hard-working Georgian for a law we think is unconstitutional. If it can happen to him it can happen to anyone.”

Charlotte says she received a brief call from her husband and now believes that the government may be torturing him as punishment for not signing up for healthcare.

“He said he didn’t know his location and the Feds holding him wouldn't tell him," she explains. "After that all I heard was screaming and the sound sparks, like when you connect the jumper cables to the wrong side of a car battery. I'm very afraid.”

"Of course we're torturing him," says Attorney General Eric Holder in a phone call with reporters. "This douchebag thinks he screw with my boy Barack's signature legislative achievement? We're gonna waterboard this motherf****r until he  admits to being a honky and a capitalist."

While Charlotte waits for her husband's torture session to wrap up, she is comforted by the fact that her own healthcare plan has actually improved under Obamacare.

 "Personally I did get a great deal on my health care coverage," she admits. "I’m getting way more bang for my buck compared to my previous insurance, so I’m pretty happy about that. This whole ordeal just goes to show that people should definitely sign up.”

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Astronauts bumped up to first class for another NASA first

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Houston, Texas – – US astronauts will be flying at an unprecedented level of comfort and style, thanks to a new agreement between NASA and Russian space shuttle operator Retro Rocket. The upgraded International Space Station package brings first-class service to space travel for the first time. Round-trip tickets to the station had originally cost $65 million per seat. The Russians raised the price last spring to $70 million a ticket, without any stated improvement in service. That didn’t sound fair to Susan Reynolds, Assistant Deputy Director of NASA’s Travel Department. She immediately went online to see if she could get a better deal, only to discover that the Russians have a lock on the space station route. With the demise of the space shuttle, NASA has no rocket system capable of servicing the International Space Station, which is endlessly circling in the low Earth orbit. “It’s a little like a NASCAR race without a Victory Lane,” said Herman “Blip” Keselowski, NASA’s liaison with Travelocity. “It’s the classic going around in circles boondoggle.” Now, thanks to Reynolds and Keselowski, the shuttle has been bumped up to a first-class boondoggle. “They’ve installed wider seats that recline 23% further and provide 16% more legroom,” said NASA astronaut Mel Freeman. “ For dinner, we have a choice of no-gravity entrées, including ribeye on a rope and flightless duck.” Also included in the first class package is an upgraded toiletries kit and priority boarding and disembarking. “You want to get off of that thing as quickly as you can,” said Keselowski, who pointed out that the 60s-designed Soyuz spacecraft uses essentially the same technology that put John Glenn into orbit during the Johnson administration. “The word ‘soyuz’ has become another way of saying ‘keep your fingers crossed’ in Russian,” he added. Asked why NASA didn’t continue its shuttle program, the space-age travel agent replied, “There are a billion and a half reasons. That’s how much each shuttle flight cost —$1.5 billion. And they didn’t even have a frequent flyer program.” Funded with the sole purpose of making space travel affordable and safe, NASA’s space shuttle program did quite the opposite, costing 14 astronauts their lives while burning up almost $200 billion in taxpayer funds. At least the International Space Station is creating some jobs. Last month, astronauts replaced an environmental systems pump on the station. That experience landed them interviews at the prestigious Iowa Institute for Heating and Air Conditioning Repair when they return to Earth. “We welcome former NASA personnel,” said Institute President Ned Frothing. “They’ll find plenty of parking in the rear and all-you-can-eat doughnuts every Thursday.”

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Astronauts bumped up to first class for another NASA first

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Read Time:2 Minute, 24 Second

Houston, Texas – – US astronauts will be flying at an unprecedented level of comfort and style, thanks to a new agreement between NASA and Russian space shuttle operator Retro Rocket. The upgraded International Space Station package brings first-class service to space travel for the first time. Round-trip tickets to the station had originally cost $65 million per seat. The Russians raised the price last spring to $70 million a ticket, without any stated improvement in service. That didn’t sound fair to Susan Reynolds, Assistant Deputy Director of NASA’s Travel Department. She immediately went online to see if she could get a better deal, only to discover that the Russians have a lock on the space station route. With the demise of the space shuttle, NASA has no rocket system capable of servicing the International Space Station, which is endlessly circling in the low Earth orbit. “It’s a little like a NASCAR race without a Victory Lane,” said Herman “Blip” Keselowski, NASA’s liaison with Travelocity. “It’s the classic going around in circles boondoggle.” Now, thanks to Reynolds and Keselowski, the shuttle has been bumped up to a first-class boondoggle. “They’ve installed wider seats that recline 23% further and provide 16% more legroom,” said NASA astronaut Mel Freeman. “ For dinner, we have a choice of no-gravity entrées, including ribeye on a rope and flightless duck.” Also included in the first class package is an upgraded toiletries kit and priority boarding and disembarking. “You want to get off of that thing as quickly as you can,” said Keselowski, who pointed out that the 60s-designed Soyuz spacecraft uses essentially the same technology that put John Glenn into orbit during the Johnson administration. “The word ‘soyuz’ has become another way of saying ‘keep your fingers crossed’ in Russian,” he added. Asked why NASA didn’t continue its shuttle program, the space-age travel agent replied, “There are a billion and a half reasons. That’s how much each shuttle flight cost —$1.5 billion. And they didn’t even have a frequent flyer program.” Funded with the sole purpose of making space travel affordable and safe, NASA’s space shuttle program did quite the opposite, costing 14 astronauts their lives while burning up almost $200 billion in taxpayer funds. At least the International Space Station is creating some jobs. Last month, astronauts replaced an environmental systems pump on the station. That experience landed them interviews at the prestigious Iowa Institute for Heating and Air Conditioning Repair when they return to Earth. “We welcome former NASA personnel,” said Institute President Ned Frothing. “They’ll find plenty of parking in the rear and all-you-can-eat doughnuts every Thursday.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Pimp sues Nike for not labeling shoes ‘dangerous’

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After brutally beating a man with his Nike Jordan shoes, a pimp filed a $100 million lawsuit against Nike for not providing a warning label that their shoes could be used as a dangerous weapon.
 
In June, Sirgiorgio Sanford Clardy, 26, or Portland, Ore., repeatedly stomped on the face of a client with his Jordan shoes when the man refused to pay Clardy's prostitute. The man required stitches and plastic surgery after the beating, The Oregonian reports.
 
The newspaper reports that the jury also found Clardy guilty of robbing the man and beating the 18-year-old woman he forced to work as his prostitute; her injuries were so severe that she bled from her ears.
 
Clardy, who is representing himself, is asking a Multnomah County judge to order Nike to put warning labels on all their "potentially dangerous Nike and Jordan merchandise."
 
Clardy handwrote a three-page complaint from the Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution in Pendleton where he is incarcerated, the newspaper reports.
 
The complaint says that Nike "failed to warn of risk or to provide an adequate warning or instruction" that their shoes are a "potentially dangerous product."
 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Russia nabs 5 terror suspects in North Caucasus

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MOSCOW (AP) — Five terror suspects were detained Saturday in one of Russia's North Caucasus provinces as the country's security agencies were scrambling to uproot any potential threat to the Sochi Games.
 
The bust in the city of Nalchik, located about 300 kilometers (about 185 miles) east of Sochi, comes less than a month before the start of the 2014 Winter Olympics.
 
The National Anti-Terrorism Committee said the suspects belonged to an international terror group and were in possession of grenades, ammunition and a self-made explosive device. The agency didn't name the group the suspects allegedly belonged to or give further details.
 
The arrests follow back-to-back suicide bombings in the city of Volgograd in southern Russia, which killed 34 and wounded 100 others, on Dec. 29-30.
 
No one has claimed responsibility for the Volgograd attacks, but Chechen rebel leader Doku Umarov, who leads Islamic insurgents in the North Caucasus, urged his men to attack civilian targets in Russia and specifically target the Sochi Olympics.
 
Security fears were further heightened Thursday when police found four cars with the bullet-riddled bodies of six men near the city of Pyatigorsk, about 275 kilometers (about 170 miles) northeast of Sochi across the North Caucasus Mountains.
 
Explosive devices had been placed near three of the cars, although only one of the bombs went off and no one was hurt.
 
Security forces in the region were scrambling to track down those responsible for those killings.
 
Russia has deployed tens of thousands of police, troops, security agents and rescue workers to protect the games, which run Feb. 7-23.
 
On Tuesday, authorities enacted a stringent security regime in Sochi barring entrance to all vehicles except for those registered in the city or with special Olympics passes.
 
President Vladimir Putin has personally overseen preparations for the Olympics, his pet project intended to showcase Russia's power and wealth. Last week, he inspected preparations for the games and went skiing in the mountains near Sochi.
 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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India says no U.S. standoff as diplomat returns home

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NEW DELHI (AP) — India's government said Saturday that there was no standoff with the United States over the arrest and strip search of an Indian diplomat in New York, as both countries appear eager to defuse the monthlong dispute.
 
After meeting with the diplomat, Devyani Khobragade, following her return to New Delhi, External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid downplayed tensions with the U.S., saying the two countries would sort out their issues.
 
Khobragade, India's deputy consul general in New York, was indicted by a U.S. federal grand jury on accusations that she exploited her Indian-born housekeeper and nanny, allegedly having her work more than 100 hours a week for low pay and lying about it on a visa form. She denies the charge.
 
She was allowed to return home in an apparent compromise with India, and arrived in New Delhi on Friday night.
 
"There is no reason now to feel any immediate concern about any outcome that might be adverse or particularly disturbing in nature," Khurshid told reporters Saturday. "In due course, we will take up all issues one by one and sort them out."
 
After the United States requested that Khobragade leave the country, India asked Washington on Friday to withdraw a diplomat from the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi. The State Department said it would comply, although with "deep regret."
 
"We expect and hope that this will now come to closure, and the Indians will now take significant steps with us to improve our relationship and return it to a more constructive place," State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters in Washington.
 
Much of India's outrage stems from the circumstances of Khobragade's arrest, which were seen as unnecessarily humiliating. Khobragade was picked up Dec. 13 and then strip-searched while in custody, which the U.S. Marshals say is common practice.
 
India also unleashed a steady stream of retaliatory measures against U.S. diplomats. Some of the measures, such as preventing the American Center in New Delhi from screening movies, were seen by some observers as petty. But others raised alarm, including removing concrete traffic barriers around the U.S. Embassy and revoking diplomats' ID cards.
 
Asked about restoring the privileges of U.S. diplomats in New Delhi, Khurshid said they would be treated the same as diplomats from other countries.
 
"I don't think we should be seen as showing more favor to one and less favor to others," he said Saturday in an interview with CNN-IBN, an Indian television news channel, refuting criticism that U.S. diplomats enjoyed greater privileges in New Delhi than their counterparts from other countries.
 
He also said a visit to India by U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz would be rescheduled soon. The visit was canceled by Washington as the controversy over Khobragade's treatment raged in New Delhi.
 
Ties with the United States have chilled in recent years over several serious policy issues, including India's delays in enacting more business-friendly reforms and the U.S. National Security Agency's alleged spying on New Delhi and other foreign governments.
 
The U.S. charges against Khobragade will remain pending until she can be brought to court, either through a waiver of immunity or her return to the U.S. without immunity status, according to the office of U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara.
 
U.S. prosecutors say Khobragade claimed to pay Richard $4,500 per month in order to obtain a visa for her. But they say Khobragade actually paid Richard $573 per month and often forced her to work more than 100 hours a week without a single full day off. The long hours meant Richard was earning $1.42 or less per hour, the indictment says.
 
After about six months of working for Khobragade, Richard fled and sought help from a nonprofit group that works with human trafficking victims because Khobragade refused to hand over her passport and allow her to return home, according to the indictment.
 
It also alleges that after the housekeeper fled, Khobragade and a relative tried to intimidate Richard's family in India by demanding they reveal Richard's whereabouts. Khobragade also launched a legal complaint against Richard in India.
 
The issue of immunity has been a key aspect of the case. Federal officials initially argued that Khobragade's immunity was limited to acts performed in the exercise of consular functions. But on Thursday, the U.S. accepted India's request to accredit her to the United Nations, which confers broader immunity. It would have been almost unprecedented for the U.S. to deny such a request unless she posed a national security risk.
 
The United States then asked India to waive the newly granted immunity so it could prosecute Khobragade, but the Indians refused. As a result, the U.S. asked her to leave the country.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Weather Channel launches campaign to stay on DirecTV

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With the clock ticking, The Weather Channel launched a national campaign Saturday urging viewers to lobby Congress to garner support for its effort to stop DirecTV from dropping it from its lineup.
 
The campaign comes as the companies continue to battle over contract talks. DirecTV, a satellite carrier, has threatened to stop airing the program Tuesday if the dispute is not settled.
 
David Kenny, chairman and CEO of The Weather Co., said it would be "deeply irresponsible'' for DirecTV to take the program off air, saying viewers depend on the coverage, particularly for severe weather.
 
"As the most trusted source of weather news and information in America, The Weather Channel is there when it matters most,'' Kenny said in a statement.
 
Weather Channel officials are urging viewers to use social media, such as Twitter, and visit www.keeptheweatherchannel.com. They also want viewers to contact members of Congress for support, citing safety concerns if the program is not available.
 
"If we are not available to DirecTV's 20 million viewers, they will miss the accurate and life-saving information we have been providing for more than 30 years,'' Kenny said.
 
But DirecTV called the campaign a "negotiating tactic.''
 
"We remain in discussions with The Weather Channel on how to provide its service to our customers at the best value since people now use so many other ways to retrieve weather-related information,'' the company said in a statement Saturday.
 
DirecTV, meanwhile, said it launched WeatherNation as an alternative to provide "hard news weather coverage.''
 
It said the move to drop the channel was also in response to "numerous customer complaints that more than 40 percent of The Weather Channel's programming is dedicated to reality television shows.''
 
DirecTV said it also provides information on its emergency channels in the case of severe weather.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Colorado alters 420 mile marker sign to thwart thieves

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DENVER —Thieves have been stealing the 420 mile marker sign so often, Colorado's transportation department has changed it to "419.99" in an effort to try and stop the problem.
 
A photo of the 419.99 mile marker sign, which is about 148 miles on Interstate 70 east of Denver, began circulating on twitter through the @JournalistsLike twitter account on Friday.
 
"So this is our way to test it out. So far it's working," said Amy Ford, a spokesperson with the Colorado Department of Transportation. "It's a traffic safety thing. It's a helpful thing to have these sings on the road. But people kept ripping them off."
 
The number 420 is often used as a reference to smoking marijuana.
 
The 419.99 sign has been put up within the last year Ford said.
 
Ford also says they've had problems with thieves stealing the 69 mile marker sign in the past.
 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Black rhino hunting permit auctioned for $350,000

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DALLAS (AP) — A permit to hunt an endangered African black rhino sold Saturday night for $350,000 at a Dallas auction held to raise money for conservation efforts but criticized by wildlife advocates.
 
Steve Wagner, a spokesman for the Dallas Safari Club, which sponsored the closed-door event, confirmed the sale of the permit for a hunt in the African nation of Namibia. He declined to name the buyer.
 
Ben Carter, executive director of the Safari Club, has defended the auction. He said all money raised will go toward protecting the species. He also said the rhino that the winner will be allowed to hunt is old, male and nonbreeding — and that the animal was likely to be targeted for removal anyway because it was becoming aggressive and threatening other wildlife.
 
But the auction drew howls from critics, including wildlife and animal rights groups, and the FBI earlier this week said it was investigating death threats against members of the club.
 
Officials from the Humane Society and the International Fund for Animal Welfare have said that while culling can be appropriate in abundant animal populations, all black rhinos should be protected, given their endangered status.
 
An estimated 4,000 black rhinos remain in the wild, down from 70,000 in the 1960s. Nearly 1,800 are in Namibia, according to the safari club.
 
Critics have also said any hunting of a rhino sends a bad message to the public.
 
"This auction is telling the world that an American will pay anything to kill their species," Jeffrey Flocken, North American regional director of the Massachusetts-based IFAW, said earlier this week. "This is, in fact, making a spectacle of killing an endangered species."
 
The auction took place Saturday night in downtown Dallas under tight security and behind closed doors. Organizers hoped to at least break the previous high bid for one of the permits in Namibia, which was $223,000, and had said the amount could be as high as $1 million. The nation offers five permits each year, and the one auctioned Saturday was the first to be made available for purchase outside of Namibia.
 
The winning bidder could have come from anywhere in the world, and at least some bidders were expected to enter by phone.
 
About 40 protesters gathered early Saturday evening outside the convention center where the auction and a pre-auction dinner were to take place. They held signs and chanted. Most dispersed by just after 6 p.m. CST.
 
Jim and Lauren Ries traveled with their children from Atlanta to protest the auction of the rare black rhino hunting permit in Dallas. Jim Ries said it was his son Carter, 12, and daughter Olivia, 11, who pushed for them to go and participate.
 
"We heard what the Dallas Safari Club was doing and we thought it was just wrong that they were auctioning off to kill a black rhino and we really got upset that they were thinking this," Carter Ries said.
 
Jim Ries said his children are passionate about animal conservation and were working to help adopt cheetahs in Africa. The family started a nonprofit called One More Generation, dedicated to saving endangered species.
 
"There's less than 5,000 black rhinos left on the planet," the father said, "and if our kids ever want to see a rhino left in the wild, we can't be pulling the trigger on every one we say is too old to breed."
 
Poachers long have targeted all species of rhino, primarily for its horn, which is valuable on the international black market. Made of the protein keratin, the chief component in fingernails and hooves, the horn has been used in carvings and for medicinal purposes, mostly in Asia. The near-extinction of the species also has been attributed to habitat loss.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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