Deadly crash cuts short hopeful college trip

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Read Time:3 Minute, 5 Second

A group of low-income and first-generation prospective college students were the victims of a fiery freeway crash that killed 10, including five youths.

It was a trip to open doors and possibilities for the students, but it was cut short by a horrific crash.

Three buses — two from the Los Angeles area and one from the Fresno area — were en route Thursday evening to Humboldt State University in Arcata when a FedEx truck crossed a median and slammed head-on into one of the buses.

The collision killed both drivers, five students and three chaperones, said Lt. Bruce Carpenter with the California Highway Patrol.

The crash resulted in a fire that engulfed the truck and bus, spewing black smoke.

"I went outside, and everything was in flames already," a local resident, Luis Lopez, told CNN affiliate KXTV. "There were a couple of explosions after that."

The reason the FedEx truck crossed the median remains under investigation, the Highway Patrol said. The investigation could take months.

At least 34 people were taken to local hospitals, authorities said.

The collision occurred in Orland, about 100 miles north of Sacramento.

One of the survivors chronicled his experience through Twitter.

"i was asleep and next thing you know i was jumping out for my life," Jonathan Gutierrez wrote, saying he couldn't believe what just happened.

He wrote that he suffered a bruised leg, cut eyebrow and scratches. Later, he said his left leg was injured to the point that he couldn't walk.

"All my stuff that I packed is burned. I'm beyond thankful that I'm still here," Gutierrez tweeted.

He called the experience traumatizing.

"Seeing everyone hurt was not how (I) expected my day to go," he said.

The other two buses made it to the university, and those students were placed in dorms, Humboldt officials said.

The university is offering counseling to those students.

An annual university program brings low-income and first-generation college prospects to campus each year for a two-day visit.

The students stay in residence halls, attend events and visit with staff and students from a program that helps historically underrepresented students, the university said.

The Los Angeles Unified School District confirmed that there were 19 students from the district on the trip but that many other districts had students on board as well. District officials could not confirm whether any LAUSD students were among those killed or the conditions of their students.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone involved in the tragic accident on I-5 in California. We are cooperating fully with authorities as they investigate," FedEx spokeswoman Bonnie Kourvelas said.

The truck sideswiped another car before crashing into the bus. The two occupants of that vehicle were not seriously injured but were sent to a hospital for treatment.

The National Transportation Safety Board announced Friday that it is sending a team to California to investigate as well.

"One, we're going to be investigating the human, the machine and the environment, and what's critical for us especially in highway accidents if for us to collect perishable information, the kind of information that goes away very quickly," NTSB Member Mark Rosekind said.

The NTSB's role will be to determine whether anything from the accident could have a national impact.

The agency seeks to determine not just what happened but why it happened, Rosekind said.

"And then the most important thing we can do is issue recommendations so that these kinds of accidents don't happen again," he said.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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John Kerry is waiting for Benjamin Netanyahu to nail himself to a very large cross

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Read Time:5 Minute, 36 Second

John Kerry is waiting for Benjamin Netanyahu to nail himself to a very large cross. Unfortunately, you’re going to have to keep reading to find out what I mean by this. First, here are four assumptions about the Middle East peace process:

1. It’s dead.

2. John Kerry, the U.S. secretary of state, is the Captain Ahab of the two-state solution, a vainglorious and delusional man devoting too much time to a peace plan that won’t work.

3. Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, is an old and weak man who will never acknowledge the validity of the Jewish narrative, and therefore never be able to make a historic compromise with the Jewish state.

4. Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, is a small and cowardly man who will never accede to the creation of a Palestinian state.

The first assumption, as we’re learning today, isn’t true.

The death certificate for the process was issued last week, when Israel failed to deliver — in line with a previously determined schedule — on a promise to release a fourth set of Palestinian prisoners from its jails. This failure was followed by a Palestinian decision to seek membership in various international conventions, a move that violated a previously made promise to avoid “internationalizing” the negotiations. Then came the issuance of an Israeli tender for more housing units in a suburb of Jerusalem that offended the Palestinians.

But the parties are actually working through their differences on the prisoner release issue. There is a decent-to-good chance they will succeed in pushing through the current bottleneck. It wouldn’t surprise me if one of the many moving parts in this latest negotiation (to my chagrin) is Jonathan Pollard; the release of this American spy could be part of a deal to end the current crisis.

Which brings me to John Kerry — and the second assumption. Kerry is many things, but he is not delusional. He believes that Israel is heading down a dangerous path, and that it will not survive as a Jewish-majority democracy if it continues to occupy and settle the West Bank. Now, I know that every iteration of the Palestinian-Israeli peace process over the past 21 years has been called the last chance for peace. But the cliche feels truer now than it has in the past.

Israel is tipping into broad isolation, and Palestinians — those who may be predisposed to a two-state solution — are giving up hope. Kerry, one of the last of a generation of intuitively, emotionally pro-Israel Democratic leaders, is not delusional to think that Israel is in trouble. Nor is he delusional to believe — as he does — that the average Palestinian on the West Bank is made miserable by the policies of Israeli occupation authorities. Nor is he delusional to believe that Palestinians already inclined to hopelessness might rise up in the absence of a Palestinian state and begin a third uprising.

Is Kerry spending too much time on this issue? Maybe. Syria is a charnel house. The South China Sea is boiling. Putin is Putin. But it is difficult to argue, especially for supporters of Israel, that the two-state solution isn’t worth pursuing.

Assumption three may be true. Kerry appears to believe that Abbas has it in him to reach a historic compromise with his enemy. This compromise not only would mean that he has to make peace with the idea that Zionism is the movement of a people returning to its ancestral homeland, rather than a form of neo-colonialism, but it would also compel him to sell this idea to his people.

Many Israelis have accepted the inevitability of some sort of Palestinian state coming into existence on the West Bank. Many Palestinians have not yet come to realize that Israel has a right to exist in at least part of Palestine. It will take a bold leader to convince Palestinians of this.

Kerry, like U.S. President Barack Obama, believes Abbas is the best leader the Palestinians have, or will have. This may be true, but it doesn’t mean that he’s strong enough to deliver. Obama and Kerry are experts on the subject of Netanyahu’s flaws. They might not have an adequate handle on Abbas’s.

The fourth assumption possesses elements of truth. Kerry believes that Netanyahu is the only Israeli leader strong enough to make peace and divide the land. Like Obama, he is unimpressed with Israel’s light political bench. He also believes that Netanyahu is applying himself in good faith to the peace process. But he thinks that Netanyahu is torn between two roles — world-historical peacemaker and mayor of Israel. Kerry’s frustration with Netanyahu (a frustration he shares with Obama) is that Kerry believes the prime minister is often more interested in preserving his political coalition, and his hold on power, than in making the bold push for peace. So long as Netanyahu acts as a long-serving mayor, and not as a prime minister, there will be no breakthrough.

Which brings us to the prime minister’s cross. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden has often argued to Netanyahu that it would be best for him to nail himself to one large cross, rather than to a thousand small ones. (Only Biden would use crucifixion imagery to describe an Israeli prime minister’s dilemma, but there you have it.) Kerry, Obama and their negotiators believe that Netanyahu will, sooner or later, have to stop nailing himself to a series of small crosses (prisoner releases, minor settlement compromises) and move to the big cross: Endangering, and possibly breaking apart, his right-wing coalition in order to advance to final-status negotiations with the Palestinians. In these broad negotiations, Israel would have to dismantle dozens of settlements in the West Bank: This is the biggest cross.

It’s an open question whether Netanyahu has this in him. Intellectually, he knows the price Israel must pay for a two-state solution. The question is whether this man of inaction can bring himself to risk his political career for a final deal. Kerry believes that Netanyahu is capable of taking a momentous step. Which is why he is sticking with the peace process, despite all the criticism. Kerry may be wrong about Netanyahu, and he may be wrong about Abbas. But he is not wrong to keep trying.

To contact the writer of this article: Jeffrey Goldberg at jgoldberg50@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this article: Zara Kessler at zkessler@bloomberg.net.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Hillary Clinton dodges shoe during Las Vegas speech

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Read Time:1 Minute, 41 Second

A woman threw a shoe at Hillary Clinton on Thursday as the former secretary of state was delivering a speech at a Las Vegas hotel, but Clinton dodged it and continued with her remarks, a U.S. Secret Service spokesman said.

Secret Service spokesman George Ogilvie said the shoe-thrower was not a ticketed guest for Clinton's speech at the Mandalay Bay hotel and had been spotted by Secret Service agents and hotel security guards before the incident.

"As agents and hotel security approached her she threw a shoe and was immediately taken into custody by the Secret Service and hotel security," Ogilvie said.

Footage of the incident broadcast by KTNV-TV showed Clinton, 66, crouching to dodge an object as she stood on stage.

The Las Vegas Review-Journal newspaper reported that the former first lady joked about the incident as she continued her speech to some 1,000 people attending a metal recycling conference

"Is that somebody throwing something at me?" Clinton asked, according to the Review-Journal. "Is that part of Cirque du Soleil?"

The newspaper quoted Clinton as saying, "My goodness, I didn't know that solid waste management was so controversial."

The throwing of shoes at political figures is a form of protest in many parts of the world. In 2008 a shoe was hurled at then-President George W. Bush when he appeared at a Baghdad press conference with the Iraqi prime minister.

Clinton, who lost the Democratic presidential nomination to then-Senator Barack Obama, said at a marketing conference in San Francisco earlier this week that she was thinking about running for president again in 2016.

She has been giving speeches across the country since leaving the State Department last year.

A hotel spokeswoman told Reuters she had no information on the episode, and a spokesman for Clinton did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

(Reporting by Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Cynthia Johnston, Leslie Adler, Toni Reinhold)

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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US Foreign Policy: Kerry ‘betrayed and surprised’ by McCain onslaught

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Read Time:5 Minute, 38 Second

Secretary of State John Kerry felt “betrayed and surprised” by Republican Sen. John McCain’s withering and highly personal criticisms at a congressional hearing, a senior administration official told Yahoo News on Wednesday.

Kerry “felt betrayed and surprised to see McCain so angrily rooting for failure against one of the most internationalist members of the administration,” said the official, who is close to the secretary and requested anonymity to speak candidly about the top diplomat’s reaction.

The key word there might be “internationalist.” Republicans long openly contemptuous of President Barack Obama’s cautious handling of world affairs — “leading from behind,” as one anonymous administration aide once described it — had hoped that Kerry would nudge the administration to take a more aggressive approach to problems such as the civil war in Syria.

“I'm sure we will have our disagreements, which I know neither of us will hesitate to bring to the other's attention,” McCain declared at Kerry’s confirmation hearing in January 2013. “But I know he will acquit himself in that office with distinction and use his many talents and his indefatigable persistence to advance our country's interests. And I commend his nomination to you without reservation.”

But the change Republicans hoped for hasn’t happened, or hasn’t happened quickly enough. At the same time, the GOP has redoubled its attacks on Obama over Russia’s seizure of Crimea, over nuclear talks with Iran, and over putting pressure on Israel in Middle East peace talks. And no one in Congress has more sharply criticized the White House on foreign policy, and especially Syria, than McCain.

The two senators, both Vietnam veterans, have long had a close bond. They worked together on normalizing relations with Vietnam. And when McCain ran for president in 2000, Kerry rose to his defense after some Republicans waged a whisper campaign suggesting that McCain’s years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam had somehow left him unsuited for the White House. “It's an insulting and degrading allegation not just to John McCain but to many who served under difficult circumstances,” the Democrat said at one point. When Kerry, in turn, ran for president in 2004, he briefly flirted with the idea of picking the Arizona Republican as his running mate.

Some in the GOP rolled their eyes at the notion of a surprising new break between the two men.

“This didn’t come out of nowhere — this is the same guy who called Secretary Kerry a ‘human wrecking ball’ last year,” said one Senate Republican aide. “And last Friday he issued the lengthy statement below on Kerry’s comment that it’s ‘reality check time’ in the Middle East.”

McCain’s office was unapologetic.

“Sen. McCain is admittedly emotional about the death of 150,000 men, women and children in Syria, and America’s failure to do anything meaningful to stop it,” said spokesman Brian Rogers. “He’s been to the refugee camps to visit some of the millions of who have been raped, tortured and displaced by the Assad regime, so it’s an issue close to his heart.”

McCain is “gravely concerned about the consequences of America’s failure to lead in the world under this administration” and “has never hesitated to mix it up and ask hard questions at hearings — he takes his Senate responsibilities seriously,” Rogers told Yahoo News.

“Mix it up”? McCain can be blunt. It wasn’t that long ago that he branded Republicans critical of policies such as drone strikes and broad surveillance powers “wacko birds.”

But his questioning of Kerry before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday was unusually sharp.

McCain said Israel-Palestinian peace talks are “finished,” charged that diplomatic efforts to end the Syria crisis were “a total collapse” and predicted that talks with Iran about that country’s nuclear program “will collapse, too.”

“You’re about to hit the trifecta,” the Arizona lawmaker said. “On the major issues, this administration is failing very badly.”

Turning to Ukraine, McCain told Kerry that “my hero, Teddy Roosevelt, used to say, talk softly but carry a big stick. What you're doing is talking strongly and carrying a very small stick — in fact, a twig.”

Kerry hit back at McCain’s “premature judgment about the failure of everything.”

“I guess it's pretty easy to lob those judgments around, particularly well before the verdict is in on any of them,” the secretary said. As for the Middle East peace process, “it's interesting that you declare it dead but the Israelis and the Palestinians don't declare it dead. They want to continue to negotiate.”

McCain cut in: “We'll see, won't we, Mr. Secretary?"

“I beg your pardon?” Kerry replied.

“We'll see,” McCain repeated.

“Well, yeah, we will see, but why declare it dead…” Kerry began.

“It's stopped. It is stopped. Recognize reality,” McCain said.

Kerry drew out his own Roosevelt quote. “Your friend Teddy Roosevelt also said that the credit belongs to the people who are in the arena who are trying to get things done. And we're trying to get something done,” he said.

“I think it's important to do this. Sure we may fail. And you want to dump it on me? I may fail. I don't care. It's worth doing. It's worth the effort. And the United States has a responsibility to lead, not always to find the pessimism and negativity that's so easily prevalent in the world today,” Kerry said.

When it comes to Iran, “we have no illusions about how tough this is. I'm not predicting success, senator. I'm not,” the diplomat said. “But I know we have an obligation to go through this process before we decide to go to war. So that's where we are. You declare them all dead. I don't.”

That led Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Menendez, D-N.J., to declare, “I think you've both made your points.”

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Eastern Ukraine erupts. Should we be surprised?

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Read Time:3 Minute, 12 Second

For many, the sudden seizure of buildings in Donetsk was as unexpected as the arrival of masked, armed soldiers in Crimea six weeks ago.

In eastern Ukraine, as in Crimea, a majority of the population is ethnically Russian. In many regions, such as Donetsk, Kharkiv, and Dnipropetrovsk, loyalties to Russia also run strong, and distrust of the new government in Kiev runs deep. And as in Crimea, many ethnic Russians voice fears – exaggerated or not – of discrimination at the hands of Ukrainian nationalists who helped topple the previous government.

However, until this weekend, eastern Ukraine had appeared calm. Nobody had attempted a coup or uprising; no paramilitary soldiers patrolled the streets.

But while Sunday's separatist upheaval may have appeared spontaneous, its underlying forces had been building for some time. And tacit encouragement from Moscow, if not outright manipulation, helped to bring Donetsk and other cities to the boil.

Until this weekend, eastern Ukraine’s outward calm concealed growing polarization. Long before Sunday’s separatist demonstrations, local activists of the movement known as EuroMaidan, or Maidan for short, say they have been feeling intensifying hostility from pro-Russian neighbors.

EuroMaidan supporters who own businesses in Donetsk say that they have faced increased bureaucratic hassles in recent weeks, including fire code inspections, tax audits, and other administrative pressures. Many have started to carry guns in their cars; others are switching apartments for sleep on a regular basis. Activists are afraid to meet in person and instead hold online voice discussions using virtual private networks to try to evade Russian surveillance.

“Only idiots aren’t afraid these days,” says one activist who asked not to be named, fearing Russian security agents.

THE MOSCOW FACTOR

For many analysts, it was only a matter of time before the “Crimean scenario” took place in eastern Ukraine.

“This was absolutely predictable from the very beginning,” says Alexei Kolomiyets of Kiev’s independent Institute of Euro-Atlantic Integration. “From the moment events began happening in Crimea, this scenario [of separatist protests] was fully expected.”

Most agree with pro-Ukrainian activists on the ground that the uprising is orchestrated by Moscow in order to destabilize the country before the May 25 presidential elections. The estimated 40,000 Russian troops and heavy weaponry stationed just across the border – less than an hour’s drive from Donetsk center – is contributing.

“Russia is doing everything it can to make sure that [Ukraine] is splintered, not a unified, single bloc,” says Vadim Karasev, an analyst with the Institute for Global Strategies.

In its negotiations with the United States and the EU, Moscow has pushed the concept of radically decentralizing government power in Ukraine, to give its regions substantial autonomy from Kiev. Moscow’s goal here, says Mr. Karasev, is to create a sort of satellite region, something akin to the Warsaw Bloc during the Cold War, to protect its own borders.  

“Russia doesn’t need the Donbass,” he says, referring to the larger geographic region that includes Donetsk. “Russia needs a federalized system that it can manipulate, with its own policies.”

Observers disagree whether Russia does in fact plan to invade, or is merely using the presence of troops as a threat to influence negotiations. But if a military incursion is in the cards, Russia may be waiting for events to reach a threshold like in Crimea where intervention will be justified.

“I believe there is an intention to invade,” says Vera Nanivska, who heads the International Center for Policy Studies in Kiev. “They have to occupy these official buildings, hold these referendums, and carry out this procedure exactly as they did in Crimea. And then Russia will be here.”

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Teacher allegedly calls student a ‘sassy slut’ then receives punishment of six day paid suspension

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Read Time:1 Minute, 51 Second

A life science teacher at private Evangel Christian Academy School in Shreveport, Louisiana caused a 12-year-old student to sob after allegedly calling her a, ‘sassy slut.’

The student’s mother asked that the girl's name be withheld to protect her from potential teasing, but her parents are speaking out in disagreement over the school’s actions. As reported by KTBS 3, the incident took place last Thursday and was overheard by other students in the science class. While the circumstances surrounding the incident have not been explained, the station reports that the girl’s parents said, ”…their daughter is well-mannered and [sic] polite girl, and hasn’t had any problems until this.”

"I'm just still numb you know, about what happened and the disciplinary action that the school had taken," said Marteen Mitchell, the girl's mother. "No, I don't think it was fair at all they initially told me that she would receive one day suspension with pay and when I made it back to my job, I received a call from the principal who stated that they were concerned and they would give her five additional days."

Red River Teacher’s United Federation President, Jackie Landsdale, told the station that while she understands why some may equate paid leave with a vacation, she assures those people that it is indeed a punishment to teachers. “I want to tell you any teacher or school employee that I've ever dealt with, who has been put out on paid administrative leave is very upset about it, they are very upset about the fact that they have been accused of something," said Landsdale. She went on to explain that in public education there is an investigation policy where the typical course of action is, “…the employee is put on paid administrative leave pending an investigation.”

Ms. Mitchell said that she does not want the instructor fired, but she feels that she should have received an apology from the teacher and the school.

Principal Bud Dean had no comment when contacted by KTBS.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Officials Say MH370 Could Be Found Within Days After Another Signal Detected

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Read Time:3 Minute, 26 Second

An Australian plane searching for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has detected yet another signal in an area where four others have been picked up so far, prompting officials to say that traces of MH370 could be found within days. 

 

Over the weekend, a Chinese patrol ship picked up two signals thought to be coming from the missing flight's black box, and yesterday two additional pings were detected by an Australian ship. Today, only one ping was heard by the black-box locating buoy dropped down by the plane, raising suspicion that the battery on one of the black box "pingers" may have already run out.  

Angus Houston, the Australian official coordinating the search, warned that the ping was not definitely coming from the plane's black box, calling it a "possible signal," and adding that "The acoustic data will require further analysis overnight." Still, the new information has bolstered hopes of concluding the mission. On Wednesday, Houston said the search crews could find the remainders of the plane in the "not-too-distant future," and that he was optimistic the search will be fruitful because the new information has allowed investigators to significantly narrow the search parameters to about 22,300 square milesPer Houston

 

Hopefully with lots of transmissions we’ll have a tight, small area and hopefully in a matter of days we will be able to find something on the bottom that might confirm that this is the last resting place of MH370.

Houston has another reason to hope in addition to this possible fifth signal. Searchers have been increasingly anxious that the black box battery will die now that we have passed 30 days since the search began, but experts think the device's battery-life could be longer than at first thought. The Associated Press reports

An Australian government briefing document circulated among international agencies involved in the search on Thursday said it was likely that the acoustic pingers would continue to transmit at decreasing strength for up to 10 more days, depending on conditions.

And some experts told the Telegraph they think it unlikely that the black box would have sunk too far into Ocean silt: 

All the signals have been detected along a narrow strip of the Indian Ocean in an area known as Wharton Basin, a mostly flat underwater region that has not been mapped in 50 years. The basin’s ocean floor has thick layers of silt, but experts said an object with a large surface area – such as the fuselage of a plane – would not be deeply buried.

Once investigators are more confident with their analysis, they will send a submarine to search for traces of MH370. 

Meanwhile, it seems other news could emerge with regard to the plane's route:

CNN fleshed out these statements in an article, explaining: 

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared from military radar for about 120 nautical miles after it crossed back over the Malaysian Peninsula, sources say. Based on available data, this means the plane must have dipped in altitude to between 4,000 and 5,000 feet, a senior Malaysian government official and a source involved in the investigation tell CNN.

CNN continues:

Malaysian air force search aircraft were scrambled around 8 a.m., soon after Malaysia Airlines reported that its plane was missing early March 8, Malaysian sources told CNN. The aircraft were scrambled before authorities corroborated data indicating that the plane turned back westward, a senior Malaysian government official told CNN. But the air force did not inform the Department of Civil Aviation or search and rescue operations until three days later, March 11, a source involved in the investigation told CNN.

The outlet also reported that the final communication received from MH370, "Good night Malaysian three-seven-zero," were spoken by the flight's pilot, Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah.

The new developments could again inspire criticism of Malaysia for withholding information.

 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Wrestling legend, Ultimate Warrior dies at 54

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Read Time:1 Minute, 1 Second

Just days after he was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame, wrestling legend James Brian Hellwig, known to fans as The Ultimate Warrior, died Tuesday, April 8, aged 54.

One of the most popular and revered wrestlers in history, Hellwig quickly became a star during the wrestling heyday of the
late ’80s. The Indiana native eventually went on to become WWE Champion at WrestleMania VI in 1990, where he defeated another
iconic fellow wrestler, Hulk Hogan.

The World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. released a statement that read, “WWE is shocked and deeply saddened to learn
of the passing of one of the most iconic WWE Superstars ever, The Ultimate Warrior.

Warrior began his WWE career in 1987 and quickly went on to become one of the biggest stars in WWE history. Warrior became WWE Champion at WrestleMania VI, defeating Hulk Hogan in an epic encounter.

We are grateful that just days ago, Warrior had the opportunity to take his rightful place in the WWE Hall of Fame and was also able to appear at WrestleMania 30 and Monday Night Raw to address his legions of fans.

WWE sends its sincere condolences to Warrior’s family, friends and fans.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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US: 1 child dead, 14 hurt in Florida day care crash

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Read Time:2 Minute, 36 Second

WINTER PARK, Fla. (AP) — A car smashed into an Orlando-area day care Wednesday, killing a girl and injuring 14 others, at least a dozen of them children, and authorities were searching for the driver of an SUV who they say started the crash, officials said.

A Toyota Solara convertible went out of control after it was struck by a Dodge Durango, jumped a curb and smashed into the day care, breaking through the wall and into the building, said Florida Highway Patrol spokesman Wanda Diaz. The convertible driver was not hurt.

The Durango left the scene but was located almost two hours later after it had been abandoned at a home. The highway patrol said it is looking for 26-year-old Robert Corchado, who has been arrested eight times since 2000, according to Florida Department of Law Enforcement records. Troopers said he was the driver of the Durango, but wouldn't say how they established that. Troopers said Corchado may be trying to leave the area, and troopers and deputies headed to Orlando International Airport to look for him.

Diaz said a girl died at Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children, but she didn't have any more information on her. One person at the hospital was in critical condition and five others were in serious condition, said spokeswoman Katie Dagenais.

In all, 13 people were hospitalized and two others were treated at the scene, said John Mulhall, a spokesman for the Orange County Fire Rescue.

Several of the injured at the KinderCare building in Winter Park were reported to be in "very, very serious condition," Diaz said.

A man answered the phone for a number listed to Corchado and hung up when he was asked, "May I speak to Robert Corchado."

"Please keep a lookout and let us know if you see anything," said Orange County Mayor Teresa Jacobs said.

Corchado's most recent arrest was on a misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of a crash involving damage, a felony charge of selling narcotics and felony marijuana possession last December. He was out on more than $10,000 bond and had pleaded not guilty to the charges. His defense attorney in that case, Jack Kaleita, didn't return a phone call or email after business hours.

Department of Corrections records show he has served prison time for trafficking cocaine and extortion.

Jacobs called the crash an "absolute tragedy and disaster."

Local television footage showed small children and infants in cribs taken outside on the day care's playground and several of the injured were carried out on stretchers.

The highway patrol reported that the injured were taken to five different hospitals.

Late Wednesday afternoon parents could be seen waiting to pick up their children, and then clutching them in their arms as they were escorted to their vehicles by authorities.

The day care's website says the center provides childcare and learning opportunities for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years old and has been in the community for over 25 years.

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Anthony Claret

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Hillary Clinton says she’s ‘thinking’ about 2016 White House run

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Asked again the question on the mind of everyone who follows U.S. politics, Hillary Clinton said on Tuesday she was “thinking” about running for president in 2016.

Appearing at a marketing conference in San Francisco, Clinton, widely considered the Democratic front-runner if she enters the race, was asked by an interviewer: “What’s your plan? Are you going to do it? You can announce it here if you’d like.”

“I’m actually here trying to get some marketing advice,” Clinton quipped, before adding: “I am obviously flattered and deeply honored to have people ask me and people encourage me.

“And I am thinking about it, but I am going to continue to think about it for a while,” she said to cheers from the audience.

“Part of it is because the hard questions are not: “Do you want to be president? Can you win? The hard questions are why. Why would you want to do this and what can you offer that could make a difference?”, Clinton said in a video of the exchange posted on the Internet

The former first lady and U.S. senator, who was defeated by President Barack Obama in the race for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination, said the United States was experiencing a period of political dysfunction.

“I saw it from afar when I was secretary and it was disheartening and even embarrassing to see people arguing about letting us default on our debt, really, and things that were just so beyond the pale,” said Clinton, who served as secretary of state in Obama’s first term.

“You had to ask yourself what kind of country do they really want. .. What is their plan? What is their vision? So if you’re going to compete in this arena, you have to be able to put forth your purpose and vision.”

Clinton, who has been giving speeches across the country since leaving the State Department last year, frequently deflects questions about her presidential ambitions. The former first lady has said she is considering a White House bid, but that she will not make a decision before the end of 2014.

“I’m not going to make a decision for a while because I’m actually enjoying my life,” Clinton said on Tuesday. “I’m actually having fun.”

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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