PayPal is set to enter Nigeria, Cameroon and 8 new countries this week

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A total of 80 million internet users stand to gain access to PayPal global services. They include those in five European markets – Belarus, Macedonia, Moldova, Monaco and Montenegro; four African nations namely Nigeria, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, and Zimbabwe, as well as Paraguay.

The firm provides online payment alternatives for consumers via mobile phones or personal computers in markets often blighted by financial fraud.

Reuters quoted the Executive in Charge of Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region of PayPal, Rupert Keeley to have said in an interview that the expansion would bring the number of countries it serves to 203.

Beginning from today, consumers in Nigeria, which has 60 million users and has Africa's largest population, along with nine other markets in sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Europe and Latin America will be able to make payments through PayPal, it said.

"PayPal has been going through a period of reinvention, refreshing many of its services to make them easier to use on mobile (phones), allowing us to expand into fast-developing markets," Keeley said.

Once the services go live, customers in the 10 countries with access to the Web and a bank card authorised for Internet transactions will be able to register for a PayPal account and make payments to millions of sites worldwide.

Initially, PayPal is only offering "send money" services for consumers to pay for goods and services at PayPal-enabled merchant sites while safeguarding their financial details.

This is free to consumers and covered by fees it charges merchants.

"We think we can give our sellers selling into this market a great deal of reassurance," Keeley, a former regional banking executive with Standard Chartered Plc and senior executive with payment card company Visa said.

PayPal does not yet cover peer-to-peer transactions, which allow consumers to send money to other consumers. It has not yet enabled local merchants in the new markets to receive payments, nor is it offering other forms of banking services, he said.

A 2013 survey of 200 UK ecommerce sites by Visa's CyberSource unit estimated that 1.26 percent of online orders are fraudulent and that 85 per cent of merchants expected fraud to increase or remain static last year.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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F1 legend Michael Schumacher ‘out of coma’

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Read Time:3 Minute, 46 Second

F1 champion Michael Schumacher has left hospital in Grenoble and is no longer in a coma, his family says.

The 45-year-old has been transferred to Lausanne university hospital in Switzerland, officials there say.

Schumacher was placed in a medically induced coma after suffering a severe head injury in a skiing accident in the French Alps on 29 December.

His family thanked people who had sent messages of support, saying: "We are sure it helped him."

They also praised the "excellent job" of medical staff at the hospital in Grenoble, in south-east France.

Doctors had kept the seven-time champion in a coma to help reduce swelling in his brain.

Michael Schumacher had been treated at Grenoble's University Hospital Centre in the French Alps

"Michael has left the CHU Grenoble to continue his long phase of rehabilitation. He is not in a coma anymore," Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said in a statement on behalf of his family on Monday.

"For the future we ask for understanding that his further rehabilitation will take place away from the public eye," she said, without giving further details.

Relatives have previously warned that "it was clear from the start that this will be a long and hard fight for Michael".

The BBC's Imogen Foulkes in Geneva reports that the university hospital in Lausanne is one of Switzerland's most renowned.

He will have a team of specialists, and his own private accommodation, and he will be much closer to his family home on the shores of Lake Geneva, our correspondent says.

But it is not clear what Schumacher's condition is and his process of recovery is still expected to be a long one, she adds.

Monday's statement was the first substantial update since early April when Ms Kehm said the German racing driver was showing "moments of consciousness and awakening."

Medically induced coma

  • Can be induced by powerful anaesthetics and is broadly similar to the sedation and artificial ventilation used during surgery
  • Used to shut down many brain functions, lowering blood flow and pressure
  • Taking a patient out of an induced coma is a delicate process, especially after a prolonged period of sedation

Neurosurgeon Tony Belli told the BBC that rehabilitation from this sort of injury could take months or years.

"We know that some people can spend three, four years in rehabilitation," he said. "It depends very much on the severity of the injury, how young and fit they are."

Meanwhile, the German football team sent their wishes to the F1 legend from the World Cup in Brazil at the weekend.

Lukas Podolski, the Arsenal striker, told a news conference: "I'd like to greet a good friend, who unfortunately is unable to be here. He is Michael Schumacher.

"He is just as crazy about football as all of us. We wish his family a lot of strength. If we win the title, that would be something that would make him happy."

Michael Schumacher

  • Born: 3 January 1969
  • First GP win: Belgium 1992
  • Last GP win: China 2006
  • Races started: 303
  • Wins: 91 (155 podium finishes)
  • Championships: 7 (1994, 1995, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004

The BBC's James Allen says the reaction from the F1 world has been enormously positive on one level, but the lack of specific details about his condition has left a question mark for many people.

The Mercedes team, for which Schumacher raced in the last three years of his career, posted on Twitter: "Encouraging news on Michael's condition this morning. We couldn't ask for a better start to the week."

Ferrari's Renato Bisignani told the BBC: "My reaction is one of overwhelming joy. There is not one day when we haven't thought of Michael, followed his progress and remembered him."

Investigators probing last December's accident said Schumacher had been going at the speed of "a very good skier" at the time of his crash in the resort of Meribel.

He had been skiing off-piste when he fell and hit a rock, investigators said.

Schumacher retired from racing in 2012 after a 19-year career.

He won two titles with Benetton, in 1994 and 1995, before switching to Ferrari in 1996 and going on to win five straight titles from 2000.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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US: Mitt Romney blasts Hillary Clinton as ‘clueless’

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Read Time:3 Minute, 5 Second

Mitt Romney had some harsh words on Sunday for the person many believe will be the Democratic presidential nominee in 2016: Hillary Clinton.

"Consider what's happened around the world during the years that she was secretary of state," the former Massachusetts governor and 2012 Republican presidential nominee said on NBC's "Meet the Press", calling her tenure "a monumental bust."

Romney slammed U.S. foreign policy, saying both Clinton and President Barack Obama have "repeatedly underestimated" America's enemies on the international stage.

"This administration, from Secretary Clinton to President Obama, has repeatedly underestimated the threats that are faced by America," Romney said. "It has repeatedly underestimated our adversaries. And whether that's Russia or [Syrian President Bashar] Assad or ISIS or al-Qaida itself, it has not taken the action necessary to prevent things from happening. We have not used our influence to do what's necessary to protect our interests."

Romney also blasted Clinton for comments she made during her recent book tour about the decision to release five Taliban prisoners in order to free U.S. soldier Bowe Bergdahl.

"She was asked whether the Bowe Bergdahl trade was one that presented a threat to the United States," Romney said. "And she came back with a clueless answer. She was clueless. She said, 'Look, these commandos don't represent a threat to the United States.' Well, of course they do. And then she went on to say, 'They only represent a threat to Afghanistan and Pakistan.' Are you kidding? I mean, we're in Afghanistan. And we're in Afghanistan in part to protect America's security."

To defeat Clinton in 2016, Romney said, the GOP "playbook, I believe, is to look at her record."

"I think her clueless comments about the Bergdahl exchange as well as her record as the secretary of state are really going to be the foundation of how a Republican candidate is able to take back the White House," he said.

Romney also downplayed House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's shocking loss in last week's Virginia GOP primary, saying Cantor's defeat doesn't signal the tea party's resurgence within the GOP.

“Our party is becoming stronger,” Romney said, noting South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham's primary victory against tea party challengers on Tuesday.

“In a very conservative state, Lindsey Graham won in a landslide,” Romney said. “This has a lot to do with the effectiveness of relative campaigns.”

Romney spoke after a GOP fundraising event he headed in Park City, Utah. He dismissed talk that the event — attended by heavy hitters including New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, Ohio Sen. Rob Portman, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee and Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan — was precursor to another presidential run for him.

"I'm not running for president," Romney said. "I brought a number of the 2016 contenders here to meet with my fundraisers. If I had been running, I wouldn't be doing that.

"Look, I want to find the best candidate for us to take our message to the American people," he added. "That we can bring better jobs, higher incomes, and more security globally. We can do that. And I'm convinced that the field of Republican candidates that I'm seeing is [in] a lot better position to do that than I am."

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Manning says US public lied to about Iraq from the start

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Read Time:2 Minute, 13 Second

New York (AFP) – The detained US soldier convicted of leaking a trove of secret documents to WikiLeaks made a rare foray into public life Saturday to warn Americans they were being lied to about Iraq once more.

Chelsea Manning is serving a 35-year prison sentence on espionage charges and other offenses for passing along 700,000 secret documents, including diplomatic cables and military intelligence files, to anti-secrecy website WikiLeaks in the largest-scale leak in US history.

"I understand that my actions violated the law. However, the concerns that motivated me have not been resolved," the soldier formerly known as Bradley Manning wrote in a New York Times editorial.

"As Iraq erupts in civil war and America again contemplates intervention, that unfinished business should give new urgency to the question of how the United States military controlled the media coverage of its long involvement there and in Afghanistan."

President Barack Obama said this week he was "looking at all the options" to halt the offensive that has brought militants within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of Baghdad's city limits, but ruled out any return of US combat troops.

Obama has been under mounting fire from Republican critics over the swift collapse of Iraq's security forces, which Washington spent billions of dollars training and equipping before pulling out its own troops in 2011.

While the US military was upbeat in its public outlook on the 2010 Iraqi parliamentary elections, suggesting it had helped bring stability and democracy to the country, "those of us stationed there were acutely aware of a more complicated reality," Manning wrote.

"Military and diplomatic reports coming across my desk detailed a brutal crackdown against political dissidents by the Iraqi Ministry of Interior and federal police, on behalf of Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki. Detainees were often tortured, or even killed."

Manning, a former US Army intelligence analyst, said he was "shocked by our military's complicity in the corruption of that election. Yet these deeply troubling details flew under the American media's radar."

Criticizing the military's practice of embedding journalists, Manning charged that "the current limits on press freedom and excessive government secrecy make it impossible for Americans to grasp fully what is happening in the wars we finance."

Manning is serving out the prison sentence at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas and had requested a name change after court-martial proceedings revealed the soldier's emotional turmoil over sexual identity.

A US Army general denied clemency to Manning in April, upholding the 35-year sentence.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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U.S. vets ‘heartbroken’ as civil war overtakes Iraq

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Read Time:5 Minute, 42 Second

DETROIT — Tony Blair served two tours of duty as an Army infantry sergeant during the eight-year Iraq War and was injured in a roadside bomb explosion.

Now the 55-year-old Warren, Mich., resident worries that everything he and hundreds of thousands of other American soldiers fought — and died — for will be lost as al-Qaida-inspired militants rampage through Iraq, embroiling the country in a sectarian war.

"If the Iraqi army and military police are not going to fight and hold their ground, yeah, they are going to take Baghdad," Blair said Friday, after a quick succession of major victories by the insurgency in the past week. "I'm heartbroken."

Iraq War veterans in Michigan and across the country are watching with dismay, bitterness and even sadness as the same insurgency they fought against took control of two major cities — Mosul and Saddam Hussein's hometown of Tikrit — last week.

"We spent a lot of time and effort to secure that region of the world and to have it kind of just fall apart," said Christopher Kolomjec, an attorney from Grosse Pointe Farms, who was a Marine major during heavy fighting in Fallujah in 2006 and 2007.

"You can't help but be extremely disappointed and frustrated that the sacrifice we made might be in vain. For every veteran who has been to Iraq, it is a constant battle to not become bitter."

Nick Cook, 36, of Grand Ledge did two tours in Iraq and, as an Army troop commander, lost five soldiers.

"For me, it's very upsetting," he said, "I watch what's happening there. My first six months, it was very intense fighting in Baghdad, but then there was prosperity and good news. And to see that now on the verge of collapse, and knowing I lost five soldiers, it's very hard. These kids may have died in vain."

Nearly 4,800 U.S. and coalition military personnel were killed in Iraq and more than 32,000 were wounded.

It also was a costly war financially for the U.S. The war will eventually cost U.S. taxpayers at least $2.2 trillion, including long-term care for wounded veterans, according to a 2013 study by the Costs of War project, based at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies.

The Sunni insurgents are part of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, the successor to the al-Qaida group that battled U.S. troops, according to Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, a fellow at the Foundation of Defense for Democracies. While the group shares al-Qaida's ideology and brutality, it was formally expelled from al-Qaida in February over disagreements on tactics and leadership.

'It's very frustrating'

Kolomjec said there are no easy answers to the current situation. He said U.S. forces long struggled to win the support of the Iraqi people because they knew the Americans would eventually leave and the insurgents would remain. But the U.S. can't ignore the situation.

"The one thing we can't do is nothing," he said. "You can't just turn your back on them."

Kolomjec said he thinks the U.S. should provide air support to the Iraqi army as it attempts to hold off the insurgents, but putting American troops on the ground is a much more difficult issue.

"I don't think this country right now has the stomach for ground troops. That's my impression," he said.

Cook, who was in Iraq in 2004-05 and again in 2007-08, also said the U.S. can't ignore the bloodshed.

"I don't think we need to put troops on the ground but we do need to support the Iraqi government to help oust (the insurgents). I really feel that air superiority would give the Iraqis a chance for a new front."

Michael Matwyuk, 58, is a former Army sergeant who fought in Iraq in 2004 and 2005 and now works as a social worker for the Department of Veterans Affairs. He lives near Iron Mountain in the Upper Peninsula.

"It's very frustrating," Matwyuk said. "We didn't leave a force behind to support the Iraqi forces, and obviously that created a vacuum. The enemy takes advantage of those vacuums, and unfortunately a lot of innocent people are going to die."

'They were right there'

There is also concern among the veterans about the people for whom they fought and the friends they made and left behind.

Cook said he made many friends there, including a young Iraqi boy who served as his interpreter.

"Now he is attending Baghdad University and I'm very worried about him. What's going to happen to him?" Cook said.

Matwyuk said he, too, is worried about the many friends he made in the Iraqi army, now under siege, and the citizens he came to know.

"There was a great deal of misconception particularly during Fallujah, during the big push, that the Iraqi soldiers weren't stepping up. That was not really the case. I was in the chow lines with them and, while they may not have had the training and discipline, they were right there alongside us."

Matwyuk said he is dismayed that the hope American troops brought to the Iraqi people now appears lost.

"We're going to lose that, lose that ground, that opportunity," he said. "When you see a people like the Iraqis hold their first election, and you get an 85% turnout and they went there under the threat of being killed, that's how committed they were."

'The topic of the day'

Jeff Barnes, who did two tours of Iraq as a U.S. Army captain, spent several days last week talking to fellow veterans about the developments in Iraq while attending the National Association of County Veteran Service Officers conference in Grand Rapids.

"It was the topic of the day," said Barnes, director of the Michigan Veteran Affairs Agency. "It's painful to see the ground we fought so hard for to be lost, the time and effort, the resources and lives lost."

Blair, the Army veteran from Warren, said he doesn't see a good way to end the conflict.

"The Sunnis and Shi'ites have been at each other's throats for a long time," he said. "We cannot stop that."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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US: Sotomayor drops by Hillary Clinton book signing

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ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — You never know who'll show up at a Hillary Rodham Clinton book event.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor dropped by Clinton's book signing at a Costco warehouse in suburban Virginia, and surprised the former secretary of state.

Clinton shouted that she couldn't believe it.

Sotomayor told reporters she was "just shopping" and decided to get a signed copy of Clinton's new book, "Hard Choices."

The Saturday morning book event attracted more than 1,000 people, including Democratic Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, Costco co-founder Jim Sinegal and a few former Clinton aides and relatives.

The potential 2016 Democratic presidential candidate autographed copies for nearly three hours.

The former first lady kicked off her book tour this week, with stops in New York, Chicago and Philadelphia.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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US: Tea Party challenger faces uphill battle in Tenn.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The defeat of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor by a Tea Party challenger has given a boost to a Tennessee state representative's campaign for the U.S. Senate.

But Republican Rep. Joe Carr still appears to face an uphill battle as he tries to beat two-term Sen. Lamar Alexander.

David Brat, a little-known college professor from Virginia, shocked political observers nationwide this week when he upset one of the nation's most powerful Republican lawmakers by 10 percentage points with little outside support. Tennessee Tea Party activists hope a similar feat can be achieved here.

In the past few days, Brat's win has meant fresh invitations for Carr to appear on national talk shows, and the possibility that new funds and volunteers could be infused into a campaign that has trailed far behind Alexander's financially and organizationally.

But recent history suggests that the odds remain against Carr, political observers say. Other Tea Party challengers have received as much interest or more, only to fall short on election day. And unlike Cantor, Alexander has moved early to contain the threat of an upset.

"If I were Joe Carr, I'd certainly try to seize on (Cantor's defeat)," said John Geer, a professor of political science at Vanderbilt University. "I think his problem is the comparisons just don't fly."

Several polls, including at least one commissioned by a Tea Party group, have shown Carr trailing far behind Alexander. Only about one in five likely Republican voters supports Carr, while about half say they have never heard of him.

Carr has been on the campaign trail since last summer, but he has been hampered by a lack of national support. Federal Election Commission records show he has brought in about $866,000 and spent about $400,000. Alexander, by comparison, has raised more than $5 million and spent more than $3 million.

National Tea Party groups haven't provided Carr any help, but he does have the support of those within the state.

In recent weeks, the Carr campaign has tried to build on that base — and raise interest in his campaign — by rolling out endorsements from his fellow state lawmakers. Carr says 20 legislators back him. The strategy has generated little publicity.

But Cantor's defeat has meant an immediate jump in attention for Carr. He was interviewed on the day after the Virginia primary by CNBC and by Fox News host Sean Hannity. On Friday, he appeared on the radio show hosted by Laura Ingraham, one of the few national commentators to take an interest in Brat before his upset.

The attention has energized his supporters.

"Interest has just exploded," said Ben Cunningham, one of Tennessee's leading Tea Party activists. "We just have to redouble our efforts to get the message out."

Carr and his supporters say there is reason to believe Alexander can be defeated. They note that the past two Vanderbilt polls, conducted in December and May, have put Alexander's statewide approval rating at 49 percent — a level that indicates an incumbent is vulnerable.

Carr said his doubters have failed to account for voters' dissatisfaction with Congress.

"People are using conventional political wisdom that doesn't apply in unconventional political times," he said.

But those doubters say the comparisons between Cantor and Alexander are faulty. While Cantor focused on the speakership, Alexander gave up his leadership position more than two years ago. That has freed him to focus on his re-election effort and issues specific to Tennessee, such as regulation of compounding pharmacies and loosening restrictions on fishing near dams.

Alexander's supporters also note that Carr has to contend with other challengers in the primary. One of those contenders is George Flinn, a wealthy Memphis physician who has high name recognition in west Tennessee after having run for Congress four years ago.

"The parallel to the Tennessee race is South Carolina," said Whit Ayres, a pollster working with Alexander's campaign. "There were six challengers who ran in that race and (incumbent Sen. Lindsey Graham) defeated all of them by 41 percentage points."

Whether Carr can make the race close depends on him, said Geer, the Vanderbilt political scientist. And unless he starts to do so quickly, he is likely to suffer the fate of most Tea Party challengers — a burst of attention followed by defeat on election day.

"The Tea Party has not done well nationwide. Republican incumbents have usually won," he said. "There's still an enormous gap, and at the end of the day, it's going to depend on the quality of the candidate."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Obama forces Philly rail workers back on the job

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Read Time:4 Minute, 2 Second

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — President Obama on Saturday forced union workers in Philadelphia's commuter rail strike to return to the job, granting Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett's request to create a presidential emergency board to mediate the contract dispute.

Obama ordered the establishment of the three-member board effective at 12:01 a.m. Sunday. He called for "a swift and smooth resolution" of the dispute between the Southeast Pennsylvania Transportation Authority and its engineers and electricians unions.

Workers will have to return to the job when the board goes into effect after midnight, however SEPTA said rail service wouldn't be up and running until around 6 a.m. Sunday. They don't have to resume direct talks with each other, but they do have to participate with the board's process, which typically involves written submissions and hearings.

Obama is giving the board 30 days to deliver a report recommending how the dispute should be resolved.

More than 400 workers went on strike at midnight Saturday.

"As long as these workers show up for their regularly scheduled Sunday shifts, Regional Rail service will restored to full Sunday operations in the morning, starting with the first scheduled service trains runs on all of our 13 commuter rail lines," said SEPTA spokeswoman Jerri Williams. First trains on Sundays start running at around 6 a.m., she said.

Stephen Bruno, vice president of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen, said his union's members will comply with the order and be back on duty at 12:01 a.m.

The move shut down train lines that carry commuters from Philadelphia to the suburbs, Philadelphia International Airport and New Jersey. The agency's subways, trolleys and buses continued to run.

Terry Gallagher, president and local chairman of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, said the presidential intervention was "what we were waiting for."

"We have been five years without an agreement, trying to get to this point and we're happy we're here now," he said. Gallagher said employees will be notified to report to their next scheduled shifts.

"The people of Philadelphia and the surrounding region expect and deserve a safe and efficient rail system to get them to work, medical appointments, school and recreation," Corbett, a Republican, said in a statement. "I call on both parties to work together, find common ground and place the riders at the forefront of mind in their discussions."

The unions said the strike was designed to force SEPTA to agree to their demands or accept binding arbitration. Workers are seeking raises of at least 14.5 percent over five years — or about 3 percentage points more than SEPTA has offered.

"My head's going to hurt by the end of this day," said volunteer Rusty Schwendeman of the Traveler's Aid Society, who had helped reroute about two dozen rail travelers Saturday morning at 30th Street Station.

They often involved several connections, longer routes or a significantly higher fare on Amtrak.

Carolyn Tola, of Hamilton Square, New Jersey, and three friends paid $40 apiece to take Amtrak from central New Jersey to Philadelphia to see the Pennsylvania Ballet instead of $9 on Septa.

"We're here," Tola said, noting that the ballet tickets were nonrefundable. "We're going to relax and enjoy it."

The strike began after negotiations between the transit agency and two unions failed to reach a new contract deal Friday. The last regional rail strike, in 1983, lasted more than three months.

The labor conflict came to a head this week after SEPTA announced it would impose a deal beginning Sunday. Terms include raising electrical workers' pay immediately by an average of about $3 per hour; the top wage rate for locomotive engineers would rise by $2.64 per hour.

The strike added to the commuting headaches in the region, where major construction projects are making it more difficult than usual to get around.

Drexel University dance team members Beverly and Angela Tomita, 18-year-old twins, had planned to take the airport line for a 2 p.m. flight home to Laguna Beach, California, for the summer.

"That's so not convenient!" Angela Tomita said when she found the region rail entrance closed at 30th Street Station. Schwendeman soon directed them to a subway-and-bus route.

"They're not the best answers, but they're the best answers I can come up with," Schwendeman told another teenager about her three-bus route home to suburban Blue Bell. "I don't want to send anybody to the middle of nowhere, either."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Obama exhorts grads to help find solutions to climate change

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Read Time:2 Minute, 31 Second

WASHINGTON — Calling climate change one of the major challenges of our time, President Obama on Saturday urged college graduates to help engineer solutions and push politicians to take action.

Obama told graduates of the University of California-Irvine that it will take their youthful spirit, passion and knowledge to overcome naysayers who don't believe climate change is a threat or don't want to take dramatic action to stop it before it causes more wildfires, floods, storms, and droughts.

"There's going to be a stubborn status quo, and there are going to be people determined to stymie your efforts to bring about change," Obama told an estimated 30,640 people gathered at Angel Stadium in Anaheim. "There are going to be people who say you shouldn't bother. I've got some experience with this myself."

The president was referring to criticism by Republican leaders in Congress — and by some Democrats — that his administration's new carbon pollution regulations are too stringent and will hurt the economy by putting more than 600 coal-fired power plants out of business and increasing the cost of energy.

Environmentalists say the action is long overdue to fight the growing threat of climate change and the catastrophic weather events it creates.

Earlier this month, the Environmental Protection Agency announced new regulations that would cut carbon pollution from the nation's power plants 30% from 2005 levels by 2030.

It is the strongest action ever taken by a presidential administration to reduce climate change, and Obama clearly hopes to make it an important part of his legacy. If the legislation survives legislative challenges in Congress and legal challenges in court, it could lead to a huge change in the way the nation gets its power.

"The question is whether we have the will to act before it is too late," Obama told the graduates. "The answer will affect the world we leave — not just to my children — but to your children and your children's children."

Obama compared the challenge to President John F. Kennedy's call to the nation in the early 1960s to land a man on the moon.

"It's no accident that Kennedy went to a university (Rice University in Houston) when he wanted to convince the nation about going to the moon," Obama said. "Progress requires the spirit of youth, it requires optimism, it requires hope."

Progress on climate change will be measured in "disasters averted, lives spared," the president said.

"Can you imagine a more worthy legacy than protecting the world?" Obama said. 'I ask you to help us leave that legacy."

During the speech, the president announced the creation of a $1 billion competitive fund for communities to tap into to pay for repairs caused by extreme weather or to protect themselves from catastrophic events.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Hackers Find a New Way Into Your Home: Your TV

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Read Time:1 Minute, 37 Second

Smart TVs are one of the newest device categories to gain mass adoption. Yet their adoption could cause more harm than it's worth—for Europeans, at least.

Forbes reports that an exploit in a new form of over-the-air broadcast signal could lead hackers right into your home via your smart TV. The so-called “Red Button flaw" (named after the iconic smart function key) was discovered by students at the Columbia University Network Security Lab.

The students, Yossef Oren and Angelos D. Keromytis, discovered the flaw in Europe’s new hybrid broadcast broadband TV standard (HbbTV for short). This standard allows broadcast stations to transmit programming alongside web content in over-the-air broadcasts.

All hackers need is a drone- or rooftop-mounted antenna to broadcast their own malicious signals to your smart TV, then gain access to your home network. Worse still, they're virtually untraceable using conventional tracking techniques. Authorities would need antennas of their own to hunt down the source of the hackers’ signals and by then the criminals could be long gone.

Oren and Keromytis demonstrated such an attack for the Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) consortium—the European standards body behind HbbTV. But the consortium apparently did not consider the threat as serious enough to alter the standard. The students argue this is problematic, since the standard is widely used across Europe.

Luckily, this is not the case in the United States. Oren says a variant of HbbTV is being considered by the the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), but it is only a “candidate standard” under review and would still have another round of reviews to endure before becoming a reality.

Even if it does roll out to Americans, the Consumer Electronics Association reports that only seven percent of American TV households actually use over-the-air signals, and that number is on the decline.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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