The BLACK George Zimmerman is in PRISON Today

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Read Time:5 Minute, 20 Second

In anticipation of the rebuttals of Zimmerman proponents, and armchair self-defense law experts who believe that “he had the right to shoot, because it was Florida law,” we must state out the outset that George Zimmerman’s defense did not rest on Florida law, nor the controversial Stand Your Ground defense. This defense was much speculated upon by the media, leading up to the trial. Almost everyone assumed Zimmerman would use it in court, but when it came down to it, his defense believed the could construct a narrative that defended him under standard self-defense law, as it exists in more or less the same form throughout the country.

“If it were Zimmerman who was shot, what would your verdict be?” prosecuting attorney John Guy asked in one of the last questions posed to jurors before they were discharged to decide the fate of George Zimmerman, on trial for second-degree murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin.

The answer to Guy’s question may be found in the 2007 manslaughter conviction of John White, a black man who shot and killed a white teenager, Daniel Cicciaro Jr., in Miller Place, N.Y., a small hamlet in Long Island’s Suffolk County.

According to testimony in the case, on Aug. 9, 2006, at around 11 p.m., White was awakened by his 19-year-old son, Aaron, who fearfully told him that a mob of local kids were coming to kill him. A teenage girl that Aaron knew, who was also a friend of Cicciaro, had received a message threatening rape from Aaron’s MySpace account. Aaron’s father, who grew up hearing stories of his family being run out of Alabama after the Klu Klux Clan burned their house to the ground, immediately grabbed a gun.

When a reportedly drunken Cicciaro and his friends arrived, the elder White and his son met them outside in the driveway of their home. Witnesses said during testimony that Cicciaro and his friends hurled racial epithets at the Whites. Police alleged that John White pointed the gun directly in Cicciaro’s face, and that when the teen slapped it away, White pointed it back pulled the trigger, shooting the teen at point blank range. White contended that the gun went off accidentally after Cicciaro lunged at him.

After a trial that lasted four weeks, White was convicted of second-degree manslaughter and criminal possession of a weapon; he was sentenced to two to four years in prison.

On the surface, the incidents that lead to the death of Cicciaro are strikingly similar to the ones that lead to the death of Martin.

Did fear and bias based on prior experiences turn White and Zimmerman into gun-toting vigilantes? Should they both have waited for police instead of confronting the teens? Did substance abuse (alcohol by Cicciaro and marijuana by Martin) influence their actions those nights? Did Cicciaro and Martin instigate their own deaths by initiating physical contact in their confrontations? And finally, what role did race play in these incidents, and in the differing verdicts reached by the respective juries?

Frederick K. Brewington, John White’s lawyer at the trial, confirmed some of these similarities while also highlighting some important differences in the cases. One distinction pointed out by Brewington is the “major difference in law between Florida and New York.”

That difference was seen clearly in the instructions given to the jury by Judge Debra Nelson, who presided over the Zimmerman trial.

“If George Zimmerman was not engaged in an unlawful activity and was attacked in any place where he had a right to be, he had no duty to retreat and had the right to stand his ground and meet force with force,” Nelson told jurors.

In New York, a duty to retreat exists in any place outside one’s home, meaning, one must first retreat from any attack if it can be done so safely. In the home, deadly force can be used as long as the resident is not the initial aggressor.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg decried Florida’s laws in a statement released after the Zimmerman verdict.

“Sadly, all the facts in this tragic case will probably never be known,” Bloomberg said. “But one fact has long been crystal clear: ‘shoot first’ laws like those in Florida can inspire dangerous vigilantism and protect those who act recklessly with guns.”

Brewington also said that while both prosecutors tried to avoid the issue of race in both cases, some serious discussion on the subject is needed.

“Our country oftentimes deals with race and deals with the issues of maltreatment on such a superficial level when it requires some in-depth and deep talk on how and why we end up in such situations. Someone needs to address why Mr. Zimmerman found it appropriate to follow this young man, why Mr. Zimmerman found it appropriate to get out of his vehicle, why he had to be the one to be the savior, why Trayvon becomes a target because of the way he looks. This conversation can’t be discussed in 30 seconds. People have to say look, ‘I’m scared of a young black man,’ let’s talk about why and see if that’s rationale. That discussion doesn’t take place, that’s part of our shortcoming as a country.”

Another major difference in these two incidents is how they ended. At trial, White was convicted of second-degree manslaughter and criminal possession of a weapon and sentenced to two to four years in prison. He was released after five months when the remainder of his sentence was commuted by former New York Gov. David Patterson — it was one of his last acts in office. George Zimmerman walked out of court a free man after a jury of his peers found him not guilty on charges of second-degree murder and acquitted him of manslaughter.

When asked if John White followed the Martin case and the Zimmerman trial, Brewington simply said, “I am in contact with him, I’m sure that he’s watched it with interest.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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PayPal accidentally credits man $92 quadrillion

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Read Time:1 Minute, 12 Second
Chris Reynolds' PayPal account was erroneously credited $92,233,720,368,547,800.

New York (CNN) — When Chris Reynolds opened his June PayPal e-mail statement, something was off.

The Pennsylvania PR executive's account balance had swelled to a whopping $92,233,720,368,547,800.

That's $92 QUADRILLION (and change).

Money that would make Reynolds — who also sells auto parts on eBay in his spare time — the richest man in the world by a long shot.

Rich, as in more than a million times richer than Mexican telecom mogul Carlos Slim. And he's worth $67 billion.

Oh, if only.

"It's a curious thing. I don't know, maybe someone was having fun," Reynolds said.

So he logged online, and reality bit back. His account balance read $0. The correct amount.

PayPal admitted the error and offered to donate an unspecified amount of money to a cause of Reynolds' choice.

"This is obviously an error and we appreciate that Mr. Reynolds understood this was the case," PayPal said in a statement.

Before this incident, the most Reynolds ever made on PayPal was "a little over $1,000" selling a set of vintage BMW tires on eBay.

So what would the would-be quadrillionaire have done with all that cash?

"I probably would have paid down the national debt," he said

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Russia in largest war games since Soviet era

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Read Time:1 Minute, 39 Second
Russian President Vladimir Putin inspects military exercises near Sakhalin Island in the Pacific Ocean, on Tuesday, July 16.

(CNN) — Russia is in the midst of its biggest war games since Soviet times, with 160,000 troops, 130 planes, 70 ships and thousands of tanks and armored vehicles participating in the country's Far East, according to media reports.

Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered the drills last Friday and they began that night, according to reports from the RIA Novosti news agency. Putin flew to Sakhalin island off the eastern coast to oversee the games on Tuesday, Russia's presidential press service reported.

"The main purpose of the activities is to check the readiness of the military units to perform assigned tasks and evaluate of the level of personnel's training and technical preparation as well as the level of equipment of units with arms and military equipment," the Russian Defense Ministry said in a statement reported by Russian Television.

In pictures: Cult of Putin

"The Sakhalin part of the maneuvers was intended to simulate a response to a hypothetical attack by Japanese and U.S. forces," Konstantin Sivkov, who is retired from the Russian military's General Staff, told the Nezavisimaya Gazeta newspaper, according to a report from the BBC.

But Russia's deputy defense minister, Anatoly Antonov, said the games were designed to "enhance the army's combat readiness" and were not directed against any specific nations, the BBC reported.

Some of the units involved in the exercises moved more than 3,000 kilometers (1,800 miles) from their bases to participate, according to the Russian media reports.

The current drills, which are expected to last through the week, are the latest in a series of snap exercises conducted by the Russian military this year, Russian Television reported. Similar drills have been conducted in the country's west, south and central military districts, the report said.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Trayvon Martin’s parents speak out on verdict

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Read Time:3 Minute, 1 Second

(Codewit) — Trayvon Martin's parents spoke out Thursday for the first time since George Zimmerman was acquitted in the death of their son.

In interviews on the three network TV morning news programs, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin assailed the verdict and the Zimmerman defense team's argument that the killing was in self-defense during an attack by the unarmed teenager.

Fulton told "CBS This Morning" she was "in a bit of shock" after the verdict. "I thought surely that he would be found guilty of second-degree murder," she said.

Trayvon's dad: My heart is broken, my faith is not

On NBC's "Today," Fulton said the case is "sending a terrible message to other little black and brown boys — that you can't walk fast, you can't walk slow. So what do they do? I mean, how do you get home without people knowing or either assuming that you're doing something wrong? Trayvon wasn't doing anything wrong."

Tracy Martin told CBS he wants America to know that Trayvon "was a fun-loving child."

Speaking to ABC's "Good Morning America," Martin added that he and Fulton did not find the verdict fair, "and of course it's devastating."

Juror pushes for new laws following Zimmerman trial

"My first thought was shock, disgust," said Fulton.

The parents also were asked about remarks by Juror B37, who told CNN she believes Trayvon Martin "played a huge role in his death."

"I don't think she knows Trayvon," Fulton said on CBS. "Trayvon is not a confrontational person."

On ABC, she added that she wishes the six-woman jury "had an opportunity to really know who Trayvon was and to put that in context with what their decision was."

The parents did not say whether they may file a civil lawsuit.

They pushed for the federal government — which is considering whether to file criminal civil rights charges against Zimmerman — to examine the case closely.

Opinion: Voices on the lessons of Zimmerman trial

Fulton told CBS she wants President Barack Obama to go through the case "with a fine-tooth comb."

"Today" asked them whether they may forgive Zimmerman, the 29-year-old neighborhood watch volunteer. "Forgiveness is like a healing process. Forgiveness takes time," Martin responded. "The Bible says that you have to forgive and forget, but also the healing process is a long process and the forgiving process is a long process."

On ABC, the couple was told that Zimmerman's parents have told Barbara Walters that they pray for Trayvon every day.

Zimmerman could still be held responsible for Martin's death

Asked whether they take any comfort from that, Martin said, "There's no winner in this situation."

He added, "We continue to pray that we'll find peace and strength to be forgiving parents."

Daryl Parks, an attorney for the Martin family, spoke with CNN's "New Day" about why the parents chose to do interviews now.

"Maybe Trayvon's human aspect, in the course of the case, didn't come out quite as much," he said. "As you listen to that juror (B37), she talks very deeply about George Zimmerman and humanizes George Zimmerman, when in this case Trayvon was the victim here."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Hindus, Shias, other minorities worse off in Pakistan: US report

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Washington, July 18 (IANS) The already poor religious freedom environment for Christians, Ahmadis and Hindus has continued to deteriorate in Pakistan over the last eighteen months, according to a US body monitors violations of religious freedom abroad.

Releasing the findings of its Pakistan Religious Violence Project Wednesday, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) said it had tracked 203 publicly-reported incidents of sectarian violence resulting in more than 1,800 casualties, including over 700 deaths.

The Shia Muslim community has borne the brunt of attacks (77) from militants and terrorist organizations, with some of the deadliest attacks occurring during holy months and pilgrimages, the report said.

"While Shias are more at risk of becoming victims of suicide bombings and targeted shootings, the already poor religious freedom environment for Christians, Ahmadis, and Hindus has continued to deteriorate, with a number violent incidents occurring against members of these communities," it said.

The report noted that between January 2012 and June 2013 there were 16 attacks against Hindus and 3 attacks against Sikhs resulting in the death of two Hindus and one Sikh. Four Hindus were also injured.

There were three incidents of targeted shootings and seven rapes against Hindus, the report said.

Noting that the project's findings "paint a grim and challenging picture for the new government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif," the report said "concrete, resolute action is needed to ensure that perpetrators of violence are arrested, prosecuted and jailed."

"To stem the rising tide of violent religious extremism, groups and individuals responsible for attacks on religious communities must be punished," it said.

"While banned militant groups and private citizens are responsible for the majority of attacks on religious communities, government actors are not blameless," the report said suggesting that "police officers have turned a blind eye to mob attacks or have refused to file police reports when victims are religious minorities."

"The climate of impunity threatening all Pakistanis, regardless of their faith, also is exacerbated by the much-abused blasphemy and anti-Ahmadi laws," the report said.

(Arun Kumar can be contacted at arun.kumar@ians.in)

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Meet the man who became world’s only ‘quadrillionaire’ for a minute thanks to PayPal error

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Read Time:41 Second

Washington, July 18 (ANI): PayPal reportedly made an error during one of its transactions and credited the account of a Philadelphia man with a whopping 92 quadrillion dollars.

According to Fox News, Chris Reynolds was shocked to see that his monthly statement email showed a credit of 92,233,720,368,547,800 dollars, but when he checked it online, it went back to zero.

Reynolds has been a PayPal customer for nearly ten years and used his account to buy and sell items such as vintage car parts on EBay.

He said that with the quadrillion dollars he would have paid the national debt and buy Phillies if he got the right price.

PayPal spokesperson did not comment on the matter but said that the company will check into the matter, the report added. (ANI)

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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America has no functioning democracy’ – Jimmy Carter on NSA

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Read Time:1 Minute, 33 Second

Former US President Jimmy Carter lambasted US intelligence methods as undemocratic and described Edward Snowden’s NSA leak as “beneficial” for the country.

Carter lashed out at the US political system when the issue of the previously top-secret NSA surveillance program was touched upon at the Atlantic Bridge meeting on Tuesday in Atlanta, Georgia.

"America has no functioning democracy at this moment," Carter said, according to Der Spiegel.

He also believes the spying-scandal is undermining democracy around the world, as people become increasingly suspicious of US internet platforms, such as Google and Facebook. While such mediums have normally been associated with freedom of speech and have recently become a major driving force behind emerging democratic movements, fallout from the NSA spying scandal has dented their credibility.

It’s not the first time Carter has criticized US intelligence policies. In a previous interview with
CNN, he said the NSA leaks signified that “the invasion of human rights and American privacy has gone too far." He added that although Snowden violated US law, he may have ultimately done good for the country.  

"I think that the secrecy that has been surrounding this invasion of privacy has been excessive, so I think that the bringing of it to the public notice has probably been, in the long term, beneficial."
 
Jimmy Carter was President of the United States from 1977 to 1981. After leaving office, he founded the Carter Center, an NGO advocating human rights. The ex-president’s human rights credentials won him Nobel Peace Prize in 2002.

Carter has frequently criticized his successors in the White House. Last year, he condemned the Obama administration for the use of drone attacks in his article "A Cruel and Unusual Record" published in the New York Times.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Why Were Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman Held to Two Different Standards of Justice?

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Read Time:6 Minute, 31 Second

(Photo: Michael Fleshman / Flickr)Why were Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman judged by different standards?

Ever since a Seminole County, Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty on Saturday night of murdering Trayvon Martin, many commentators in the mainstream media have made a special effort to point out that Florida's "Stand Your Ground and Shoot First" law played no role whatsoever in Zimmerman's acquittal.

Here, for example, is a clip – cut courtesy of Media Matters – of CNN's Chris Cuomo dismissing Stand Your Ground's impact on the case during a Sunday broadcast, less than a day after the jury announced its verdict.

Chris is just wrong. "Stand Your Ground" isn't some stand-alone law, it's a complete modification of Florida's rules governing the use of deadly force for self-defense. As a result, it played an essential role in the Zimmerman trial. In fact, it created two different standards by which the six jurors judged both George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin.

As former Florida State Senator Dan Gelber has pointed out, pre-Jeb Bush, pre- Koch Brothers, and pre-ALEC Florida law would have required the following instructions to be read to a jury in a self-defense murder trial:

"The defendant [George Zimmerman] cannot justify the use of force likely to cause death or great bodily harm unless he used every reasonable means within his power and consistent with his own safety to avoid the danger before resorting to that force. The fact that the defendant [George Zimmerman] was wrongfully attacked cannot justify his use of force likely to cause death or great bodily harm if by retreating he could have avoided the need to use that force."

Note that according to these jury instructions, the defendant must do everything possible, including retreating, before attempting to use deadly force.

When confronted with a threat in 2005 and before, whether it was a deadly threat or simply the threat of violence, or even when confronted with actual violence, like being punched in the face or knocked to the pavement, the legal obligation was to work yourself free and run.

All that changed in Florida in 2006, when Florida's brand-spanking new and ALEC-promoted Stand Your Ground and Shoot First law came into effect.

Since 2006, post-Jeb Bush, post-Koch Brothers, and post-NRA and ALEC, the Stand Your Ground and Shoot First concept has become fully integrated into Florida's law regarding self-defense and the use of deadly force.

This is why the jury instructions for the Zimmerman jury included Stand Your Ground language, because that language is now part of Florida's laws about self-defense.

Listen carefully to the difference between the "You Must Retreat" language in the pre-2006 jury instructions and the instructions used in the Zimmerman trial. Remember, before 2006 Florida law said that even if the other guy started the fight, you still had an obligation to run. The old law read as follows:

"The fact that the defendant was wrongfully attacked cannot justify his use of force likely to cause death or great bodily harm if by retreating he could have avoided the need to use that force."

By comparison, here are the Stand Your Ground instructions that actually were read to the Zimmerman jury:

"The danger facing George Zimmerman need not have been actual; however, to justify the use of deadly force, the appearance of danger must have been so real that a reasonably cautious and prudent person under the same circumstances would have believed that the danger could be avoided only through the use of that force. Based upon appearances, George Zimmerman must have actually believed that the danger was real.

"George Zimmerman… had no duty to retreat and had the right to stand his ground and meet force with force, including deadly force, if he reasonably believed that it was necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself …"

George Zimmerman didn't even have to have a threat of deadly force used against him. All he had to do was imagine that there was such a threat. And instead of running, he could stand his ground and shoot first to kill.

Even more interesting than this is that both in the actual Zimmerman trial and in the trial conducted in the American media, both Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman were essentially on trial.

In the courtroom proceedings, Trayvon Martin was being judged as part of Zimmerman's self-defense argument. "Why he didn't run away from Zimmerman?" the defense asked. Because Martin didn't run away, Zimmerman's lawyers suggested that Zimmerman was justified in killing him. This was so explicit in the trial that defense attorney Mark O'Mara even asked for four minutes of silence during his closing arguments as if to demonstrate that Trayvon Martin had plenty of time to turn and run.

Here's a clip of O'Mara's remarks.

And in the media trial of Trayvon Martin, commentators have repeatedly asked, "why didn't the seventeen year-old just run away from the armed man who was chasing him?"

As one of Florida's most famous white pastors, Bill Keller, argued in a nationally published op-ed, "The facts were clear that Trayvon Martin had more than enough time to get back to his father's house, but chose instead to confront Zimmerman, break his nose, and continue the violent attack." In other words, Trayvon Martin should have run away.

So, the question: Why was Trayvon Martin judged, both in the trial and in the media, on the basis of the pre-2006 Florida self-defense law that requires a person to do everything they can to avoid violence up to and including running away?

And, equally troubling, if that was the standard that Trayvon Martin was held to, why was George Zimmerman, who actually held the gun and fired the shot, held to a different standard and allowed to stand his ground and kill an unarmed teenager without penalty?

Remember, nobody ever seriously suggested, in the trial or in the media, that Trayvon Martin had a right to stand his ground. Instead, everybody wanted to know why he didn't run.

And remember that over and over again the media, George Zimmerman's lawyers, and Judge Nelson herself explicitly said that George Zimmerman had the legal right to stand his ground and use deadly force if he even felt threatened. While Trayvon should have run, Zimmerman didn't have to run.

Remember the actual instructions that Judge Nelson read to the jury about the standard to which George Zimmerman should be judged:

"George Zimmerman… had no duty to retreat and had the right to stand his ground and meet force with force, including deadly force if he reasonably believed that it was necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or another…"

Why were George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin judged by different standards? Why was Trayvon Martin judged according to pre-Koch brothers Florida law, while George Zimmerman was judged according to post-Koch brothers Florida law? And, perhaps more importantly, why is nobody in the media pointing this out?

If you're as astounded by this as I am, you may want to contact your local media outlet and ask them that question.

This article was first published on Truthout and any reprint or reproduction on any other website must acknowledge Truthout as the original site of publication.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Poll: US Still Seen as Top Economic Power

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Read Time:3 Minute, 19 Second

The United States is still viewed as the world's leading economic power in many countries, according to polls in 39 nations by the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project. But as the Great Recession has buffeted the U.S. economy, China has gained rapidly in the eyes of the rest of the world, and many say it ultimately will replace America as the world's top global economic force.

 

In 22 of the 39 nations polled, the U.S. is seen as the top global economy, while China is viewed as having the upper hand in eight countries, including U.S. allies Canada, Britain, Germany and France. Surprisingly, Americans are about evenly divided over which country has the stronger economy, with 44 percent saying China and 39 percent the United States.

 

Since 2008, the population share that calls China the world's top economy has just about doubled in Spain, Germany and Britain, nearly tripled in Russia, and gained 22 points in France. Of the 20 countries Pew surveyed in both 2008 and 2013, all but two are now significantly more likely to say China is the world's leading economic power.

 

In 18 of the countries polled, half or more believe China has or will replace the U.S. as the world's top economic force, while majorities in only three believe the U.S. will maintain its top economic position.

 

The surveys, conducted before news about the NSA's surveillance programs broke, also found that 37 of the 39 countries saw the U.S. as a good steward of individual liberty than a poor one.

 

Before leaks of classified documents revealed widespread U.S. tracking of Internet communications among people in other countries, many said they were confident President Barack Obama would do the right thing in world affairs, including 88 percent in Germany and 83 percent in France, two allies whose official reactions to the spying program have been broadly negative. Few in those nations think the U.S. gives their countries' concerns much weight when setting foreign policy; just 35 percent in France and half in Germany say America considers their interests at least "a fair amount."

 

Other findings from the surveys:

 

—The U.S. is viewed favorably by a majority in 28 of the 38 other nations tracked in the poll, with favorability ratings above 80 percent in Ghana, Senegal and Kenya in Africa, Israel in the Middle East and the Philippines in Asia. America fares worst in the Middle East, where most have an unfavorable opinion in five of seven nations surveyed, including 81 percent with a negative view in Egypt and 70 percent unfavorable in Turkey.

 

— Among those in nations that receive U.S. economic aid, Egyptians and Pakistanis are more apt to say the assistance is having a negative impact on their country, while other African nations surveyed view such assistance as a positive influence.

 

—Majorities in just three of the 39 countries say they approve of the U.S. use of drones to target extremists: Israel (64 percent approve), the United States (61 percent approve) and Kenya (56 percent approve).

 

—More than 9 in 10 in Japan (96 percent) and South Korea (91 percent) say that China's growing military power is a bad thing.

 

The Pew Research Center interviewed 37,653 respondents in 39 countries from March 2 through May 1, 2013. Interviews were conducted face-to-face or by telephone, depending on the country, and are representative of at least 95 percent of the adult population of each nation except for China and Pakistan, where the samples were disproportionately urban, Argentina, Bolivia, Greece, Indonesia and Malaysia, where some difficult to reach or rural populations were excluded, and the Czech Republic and Japan, where interviews were conducted either by cellular or landline telephone only.

 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Astronaut Nearly Drowns on Spacewalk

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Read Time:1 Minute, 45 Second
Astronaut Luca Parmitano nearly drowned during his spacewalk this morning, NASA officials said during a press conference this afternoon.
 
During his second walk in two weeks to perform routine maintenance on the International Space Station, the Italian astronaut had one to five liters of water seep into his helmet, impairing his ability to see or hear, NASA officials said.
 
WHAT TO KNOW
Water accumulated inside astronaut Luca Parmitano’s helmet this morning during a spacewalk at the International Space Station, causing Mission Control to abort the walk.
 
The unexpected problem forced Mission Control to abort the spacewalk and send Parmitano and his American colleague Chris Cassidy back into the airlock of the International Space Station.
 
NASA is conducting intensive forensic work to figure out the cause of the leak. The drink bag attached to the suit holds 32 ounces of water and the cooling system holds a gallon.
 
It took 24 minutes to get Parmitano back into airlock and another 11 minutes to get him out of the suit, NASA officials said. The crew inside the space station raced to help him get out of his spacesuit because he was having trouble seeing and hearing at that point.
 
Cassidy told Mission Control "the water tastes funny, not like our water from the portable water dispenser" after the two were out of their spacesuits, NASA said.
 
International Space Station Astronauts Walk in Space
 
The spacewalk was supposed to last about six and a half hours, but the water problem shortened it to an hour and 32 minutes.
 
This was the second spacewalk for the two in a week -­ Cassidy was on his sixth spacewalk, and Parmitano was on his second. He was the first Italian astronaut to walk in space when he headed out.
 
None of the items on the spacewalk to-do list today are critical, but they are important for space station maintenance and to prep the station for a new Russian module that will be coming up to the space station, NASA said.
 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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