Chris Brown gets 1,000 extra hours community service

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 9 Second

LOS ANGELES (AFP) – Singer Chris Brown was ordered to perform 1,000 hours community service Friday after his probation stemming from the 2009 assault on his then girlfriend Rihanna was restored, officials said.

The 24-year-old R&B star’s probation was revoked last month after he was hit with misdemeanor charges following a minor traffic accident.

Those charges were dismissed on Thursday and on Friday Los Angeles Superior Court judge James Brandlin restored his probation.

The reinstated probation order was conditional on Brown completing 1,000 hours of community labor, in addition to the 180 days he had already been ordered to perform.

Judge Brandlin said Brown would be put to work in one of four programs — highway clean-up, beach clean-up, graffiti removal or a program run by the probation department.

The order came after prosecutors questioned whether Brown had in fact completed the initial 180-day period of community service he was sentenced to. They cited “significant discrepancies” in his work record.

However the singer’s lawyer contested the allegation, saying prosecutors “chose to ignore the actual evidence in an effort to find someone, anyone, to say he was not working.”

In 2009 Brown pleaded guilty to assaulting fellow singer Rihanna earlier that year on the eve of the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

RNC votes to punish CNN and NBC for Clinton films

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 5 Second
BOSTON — As expected, Republican Party officials voted Friday not to allow CNN and NBC to sponsor Republican primary debates in 2016 if the networks air planned programs about potential 2016 Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.
 
In a resolution passed at the party's summer meeting in Boston, national committee members called CNN's planned documentary and NBC's planned biopic "little more than extended commercials supporting Secretary Clinton" and an attempt to put "a thumb on the scales" for the 2016 presidential election.
 
GOP chair Reince Priebus had sent a letter to the networks Aug. 5. telling them to drop plans for the programs or face the RNC action. NBC News has said the fictionalized biography is being developed by the network's entertainment division, a separate entity from the news division. CNN asked the RNC to "reserve judgment" until the documentary is further along.
 
Though the RNC is making Hispanic outreach a priority, the ban nonetheless includes NBC's cable networks and Telemundo and CNN Espanol, RNC spokeswoman Kirsten Kukowski said. Both networks aired debates during the 2012 campaign.
 
The RNC is trying to find ways to limit the number of debates in 2016 after the marathon of 20 debates in the 2012 primaries, which Priebus said gave the party's candidates too much opportunity to "slice and dice" each other. Republican candidates could agree to debates regardless of the RNC action, Kukowski said.
 
Clinton, who recently stepped down as secretary of State, has not said whether she plans to run for office, but activists around the country are organizing a campaign infrastructure for her.
 
After the vote, CNN issued the following statement:
 
"CNN Films, a division of CNN Worldwide, commissioned a documentary about Hillary Clinton earlier this year. It is expected to premiere in 2014 with a theatrical run prior to airing on CNN. The CNN broadcast date has not been determined. This documentary will be a non-fiction look at the life of a former First Lady and Secretary of State. The project is in the very early stages of development, months from completion with most of the reporting and the interviewing still to be done. Therefore speculation about the final program is just that. We encouraged all interested parties to wait until the program premieres before judgments are made about it. Unfortunately, the RNC was not willing to do that."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Scorned judge tried to frame mistress’ husband?

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 23 Second
They take their rivalries seriously in Mingo County, West Virginia. But even residents like the Hatfields and McCoys of yore might do a double-take at the allegations against Circuit Court Judge Michael Thornsbury. He is accused of having an affair with his secretary and then trying for years to frame and imprison her husband after the affair went sour in 2008, reports the Charleston Gazette.
 
Some examples from yesterday's federal indictment:
 
Thornsbury allegedly plotted to have a friend plant drugs under the husband's truck, then have troopers pick him up. The friend backed out at the last minute.
 
When the husband was the victim of an armed assault outside a convenience store, prosecutors say the judge arranged to have the charges dropped against the two assailants—then had the husband charged as the perpetrator. He allegedly pressured prosecutors to try to imprison the husband for six months over the incident, but they dropped the charges, reports AP. Thornsbury allegedly got a state trooper to arrest the husband on false grand larceny charges—claiming that he stole scrap metal from his job, even though his employer had given permission to take it—then installed a business associate as foreman of the grand jury. The case unraveled when one of the subpoenaed businesses made public the ties between the judge and the foreman, reports the Wall Street Journal.
 
In short, "he corrupted the system of justice in Mingo County for his own nefarious purposes," says a U.S. attorney. Thornsbury's law license has been suspended as the criminal conspiracy case proceeds.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Earthquake rattles Mexico City

0 0
Read Time:50 Second
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A moderate earthquake shook Mexico's capital Friday but caused no immediate reports of damage or injuries.
 
The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake in the Pacific Coast state of Guerrero had a preliminary magnitude of 5.4. The southern state's government said it had initiated security protocols but did not immediately report damage or injuries.
 
Many office workers evacuated their buildings after the quake set off alarms in Mexico City but Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera said in a message from his Twitter account that there were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.
 
Mexico City is vulnerable to distant earthquakes because much of it sits atop the muddy sediments of drained lake beds. They jiggle like jelly when quake waves hit.
 
The magnitude-8.1 quake in 1985 that killed at least 6,000 people and destroyed many buildings in Mexico City was centered 250 miles (400 kilometers) away on the Pacific Coast.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

CIA: The mysterious Area 51 exists!

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 39 Second
After years of government denials, the CIA is officially acknowledging in newly declassified documents the existence of Area 51, the mysterious site in central Nevada that has spawned top-secret tools, weapons and not a few UFO conspiracies.
 
George Washington University's National Security Archive obtained a CIA history of the U-2 spy plane program through a public records request and released it Thursday.
 
National Security Archive senior fellow Jeffrey Richelson reviewed the history in 2002, but all mentions of Area 51 had been redacted.
 
Richelson says he requested the history again in 2005 and received a version a few weeks ago with mentions of Area 51 restored.
 
Officials have already acknowledged in passing the existence of the facility in central Nevada where the government is believed to test intelligence tools and weapons.
 
Richelson believes the new document shows the CIA is becoming less secretive about Area 51's existence, if not about what goes at the location 90 miles north of Las Vegas.
 
He said that releasing information on the site "is clearly a conscious decision to acknowledge the name, the location rather than play pretend about the secrecy," the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports.
 
The references are found in a CIA history of the U-2 reconnaissance program written in 1992.
 
The history even recalls the first time CIA project director Richard Bissell and Air Force officer Col. Osmund Ritlandt spotted the site, which was then an old airstrip by the salt flat named Groom Lake.
 
They viewed it from aboard a small Beechcraft plane piloted by Tony LeVier, Lockheed's chief test pilot.
 
Excerpt
 
They spotted what appeared to be an airstrip by a salt flat known as Groom Lake, near the northeast corner of the Atomic Energy Commission's (AEC) Nevada Proving Ground.
After debating about landing on the old airstrip, LeVier set the plane down on the lakebed, and all four walked over to examine the strip. The facility had been used during World War II as an aerial gunnery range for Army Air Corps pilots. From the air the strip appeared to be paved, but on closer inspection it turned out to have originally been fashioned from compacted earth that had turned into ankle-deep dust after more than a decade of disuse.
If LeVier had attempted to land on the airstrip, the plane would probably have nosed over when the wheels sank into the loose soil, killing or injuring all of the key figures in the U-2 project.
The document says the group agreed that the location "would make an ideal site for testing the U-2 and training its pilots," according to the history.
 
The lightweight U-2 spy plane was being built by Lockheed at its top-secret "Skunk Works" plant in Burbank, Calif.
 
The document says that the CIA then called on the Atomic Energy Commission to add the Groom Lake area to its real estate holdings in Nevada.
 
"AEC chairman Adm. Lewis Strauss readily agreed and President Eisenhower also approved the addition of this strip of wasteland, known by its map designation as Area 51,to the Nevada Test site," according to the document.
 
"To make the facility in the middle of nowhere sound more attractive to his workers, (Skunk Works founder) Kelly Johnson called it the Paradise Ranch, which was soon shortened to the Ranch," according to the document.
 
Several books and articles in recent years had already begun to penetrate the mystery of Area 51.
 
In 2010, James Noce, who said he did contract security work at the site in the 1960s and 1970s, told The Seattle Times that he used to get paid in cash, signing a phony name to the receipt.
 
Noce, then 72, told the newspaper that he had attended the first-ever public reunion in 2009 of former Area 51 workers.
 
"I was doing something for the country," Noce says about those three years in the 1960s. "They told me, 'If anything should ever come up, anyone asks, 'Did you work for the CIA?' Say, 'Never heard of them.' But [my buddies] know."
 
Contributing: Associated Press

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Earthquakes rock New Zealand

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 25 Second
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Strong earthquakes shook central New Zealand on Friday, damaging homes, destroying a bridge and sending office workers scrambling for cover in the capital.
 
The first quake, a magnitude-6.5, struck just after 2:30 p.m. (2:30 a.m. GMT) near the small South Island town of Seddon. It was followed by several aftershocks of magnitude 5 or stronger.
 
Police spokeswoman Barbara Dunn said several homes near the epicenter were severely damaged, with chimneys collapsing and roofs caving in. She said a bridge had collapsed on State Highway 1, the major route for traffic near Seddon, and that rocks and debris had fallen onto the road. Police closed a section of the highway.
 
There were no initial reports of injuries.
 
Some buildings in Wellington, the capital, were evacuated, and items were knocked off shelves in places.
 
Police said a number of people were freed from Wellington elevators that stopped working. The initial temblor also temporarily closed down the nation's stock exchange. It was reopened at 3:45 p.m.
 
The U.S. Geological Survey said the epicenter of the initial temblor was 94 kilometers (58 miles) west of Wellington at a depth of 10 kilometers (6 miles).
 
Local authorities issued no tsunami warnings.
 
A quake of similar strength in the same area three weeks ago broke water mains, smashed windows and downed power lines.
 
New Zealand is part of the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire" that has regular seismic activity. A severe earthquake in the city of Christchurch in 2011 killed 185 people and destroyed much of the city's downtown.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Report: NSA spying broke privacy rules many times

0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 45 Second
The National Security Agency broke privacy rules or overstepped its legal bounds thousands of times each year since Congress granted it broad new powers in 2008, according to news reports published Thursday night.
 
An internal audit of the agency based in suburban Maryland turned up almost 2,800 incidents within a year, according to a report by The Washington Post.
 
The majority of the incidents involve unauthorized spying on Americans or foreign intelligence targets in the United States, the Post reports.
 
Many of the incidents mentioned in the audit obtained by the Post were connected to failures of due diligence or failure to follow standard operating procedure.
 
In one instance, the news organization reports, the NSA decided that it was not necessary to report it had unintentionally taken part in surveillance of Americans. One example involved a mix-up in which the Washington area code 202 was mistaken for the Egypt telephone country code of 20, the Post reported. Another set of incidents involved unauthorized use of data concerning more than 3,000 Americans and green-card holders, according to the Post.
 
The report was based on documents provided earlier this summer to the Post by Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor wanted by the United States for leaking secrets regarding NSA intelligence gathering.
 
In a statement released Aug. 9 on its website, the NSA said that its staff members "are obligated to report when they believe NSA is not, or may not be, acting consistently with law, policy or procedure."
 
The NSA told the Post in a statement that it tries to identify problems "at the earliest possible moment, implement mitigation measures wherever possible and drive the numbers down."
 
"We're a human-run agency operating in a complex environment with a number of different regulatory regimes, so at times we find ourselves on the wrong side of the line," a senior NSA official said in an interview, speaking to the newspaper with White House permission on the condition of anonymity.
 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Topless activist freed early from jail

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 26 Second
ASBURY PARK, N.J. — A day after her early release from the Monmouth County Jail, topless rights proponent Phoenix Feeley issued a brief but harsh summary of her stay at the Freehold Township lockup, along with a photo of herself in the free world — cleavage prominent, naturally.
 
Feeley, 33, thanked strangers and supporters alike who she said helped her survive a nine-day hunger strike at the jail. She was released a little less than a week early for good behavior, said Cynthia Scott, spokeswoman for the Monmouth County Sheriff's Office.
 
"I didn't shed a single tear in their cage, and no they couldn't break me," she wrote on the Facebook page of gotopless.org, a group that advocates for equal topless rights and has offered support — plus the guest-speaker honor at a topless rally in New York City next weekend — to Feeley. "Not even the guards' violent threats could stop me, and that is because of everyone who loves and believe in me."
 
Feeley was originally arrested and fined for refusing to cover herself on a Spring Lake beach in 2008. She claims that it is discriminatory for women to have to cover themselves while men can bare their chests just about anywhere.
 
Feeley was sentenced Aug. 8 to 16 days in the county jail for refusing to pay $816 in fines. She had been jailed since Aug. 12, so she had 12 days left to serve.
 
In a quick hearing before the sentence, Feeley, who lives in New York City, described a hellish existence at the jail, in which a guard abused her, the food was "crap," the water was dirty and undrinkable and, outside her cell, a bloody message read "help me." She called the judge's decision a "death sentence."
 
The jail has denied her assertions. "The comments that Ms. Feeley made against the Monmouth County Correctional Institution were false. She was not mistreated while at the facility," Scott said.
 
"Throughout Ms. Feeley's stay, the correctional and medical staff continued to ensure her safety, health and well-being," Scott wrote in an email. "Ms. Feeley's vitals were checked regularly, she was offered three meals per day and an organic supplement, all of which she refused. However, she continued to drink water and remained in good health while at the facility."
 
In the Facebook post, Feeley wrote: "Out of jail. After 48 hours of no food or drinkable water and telling the Judge I'd never survive 16 days like that, they began to give me water and consequently I live to tell the tale. The warden let me out early. I haven't eaten in 9 days since I was put in custody but am going to soon."
 
She continued, "Nine days naked in a filthy cell in lock down, on a hunger strike, not allowed visitors, mail, phone calls, or anything besides a couple of blankets and a tiny window to the outside world while on 24 hour video surveillance was a new experience that I am happy is over and wouldn't have been able to live thru without your love."
 
Nadine Gary, president of gotopless.org, said she has not spoken directly with Feeley since her release, and that an email from Feeley said she would be incommunicado for a couple of days.
 
"After nine days of fasting, there is a toll on her body and on her health," Gary said. "I'm so glad she's out."
 
Feeley's post also thanked a donor who offered to pay her fines for her release.
 
That potential donor, Ron Taft, a Manhattan lawyer who vacations in Upper Freehold, said a jail representative told him that Feeley passed on his request because "she wanted to make a point."
 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

Unclaimed $1M lottery ticket set to expire in N.Y.

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 56 Second
RYE, N.Y. — The mystery of who bought a Powerball ticket worth $1 million at a local deli nearly a year ago is giving new meaning to the New York Lottery slogan, "Hey, You Never Know."
 
The unknown ticketholder has until Aug. 25 to emerge; otherwise the money will go into a prize pool for future winners.
 
Ralph Alfalahi, whose Playland Market in Rye sold the winning ticket, has been reminding customers to check their old stubs.
 
He's even placed a sign outside his deli with the lucky numbers: "1-6-7-20-49, Powerball 23."
 
"I have no idea who it is," Alfalahi said. "I wish I knew."
 
It's hard to imagine how anybody could leave $1 million on the table. But New York Lottery spokeswoman Christy Calicchia says missed winnings are far more common than one would think.
 
Some players lose the ticket, put it through the wash or forget they ever bought it, Calicchia said. Some don't realize there's more than one drawing prize. Others lose interest when there's no jackpot.
 
In just the last four months, winners statewide have failed to claim nearly $28 million in drawing-game prizes before they expired.
 
Last year, there were more than $65 million in expired winnings.
 
Calicchia noted the unclaimed $65 million represented just 1.5 percent of the state lottery's $4.2 billion in overall prize money last year.
 
Still, lottery officials don't take it lightly when a large prize goes unclaimed.
 
"We use the news media, social media and any other means possible to publicize the fact" that it hasn't been claimed yet and "encourage players to check their tickets," Calicchia said.
 
The Rye ticket isn't the only big winner yet to be claimed in the region. Lottery officials are also waiting for the buyer of a $1 million Sweet Million ticket to step forward after a Jan. 24 drawing. The ticket was sold at M & M Super Store in Suffern.
 
The New York Lottery's biggest unclaimed prize was a $68 million Mega Millions jackpot announced in a 2002 Christmas Eve drawing for a ticket sold in Brooklyn.
 
The Rye prize, at $1 million, would be the Lower Hudson Valley's biggest expired ticket, according to Calicchia.
 
The odds of winning: 1 in 5,153,633.
 
After state and federal taxes, the take-home pay would be an estimated $662,000.
 
And that's nothing to sneeze at — even in Rye, which was just ranked 10th in the nation on CNN Money's Top-Earning Towns list.
 
"In this town, maybe that's a new boat or something," quipped Marcus Peters, who moved to Rye from Rutherford, N.J., earlier this month and rarely plays Lotto.
 
Another Rye resident, Tom Turner, seemed eager to know the exact time and date the ticket was sold.
 
He spends about $10 a day on lottery games at Playland Market and keeps a large stack of old Powerball tickets at home — just in case.
 
"It would be exciting" to win $1 million, Turner said Tuesday while playing a $5 scratch-off game. "It's free money. Everybody loves free money."

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %

McCain: Border patrol’s housing costs ‘disgraceful’

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 34 Second
PHOENIX — Members of Arizona's congressional delegation are seeking answers from the Department of Homeland Security on why Customs and Border Protection spent about $15 million for housing in the former mining town of Ajo, Ariz.
 
At a town hall meeting Tuesday in Tucson, in response to questions about the housing, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said, "It's disgraceful." Asked by a constituent how it could be justified, he replied, "It can't. It can't be; and people should be fired."
 
As The Arizona Republic reported Monday, CBP paid more than $600,000 each to build 21 modest homes for its personnel in Ajo, a small southern Arizona town where similar-size homes typically cost less than $100,000. CBP also paid more than $2 million to buy 20 park-model trailer homes and lease land on which to park them. The housing project opened in February.
 
CBP has declined to say how many of the homes and trailers are occupied or how much personnel pay to rent them, other than to say they pay what a spokesman called "market rates."
 
"We're going to ask for some real answers, and follow up on the tremendous costs," said U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., whose district includes Ajo. "If we don't get a response, we'll ask the [Office of the] Inspector General to take a thorough look at that, and I hope some of my colleagues will join me. I'd bet that this situation is not unique."
 
Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., also said he intends to pursue answers about the housing controversy.
 
"I'd like to know some more details, but, boy, on its face it looks like a lot of wasted money," Flake said. "On its face, how you can justify spending that much money on new housing is beyond me."
 
Several other delegation members said they, too, already have or will shortly query Homeland Security about the costs. Rep. Ron Barber, D-Ariz., provided a copy of a letter he sent Thursday to Thomas Winkowski, the acting CBP commissioner, asking for an explanation and justification of the costs and value of the homes and trailers.
 
Barber said he wants "immediate answers from the Department of Homeland Security on how and why these outrageous expenses were approved."
 
The controversy over the taxpayer-funded homes comes as Congress debates immigration reforms and whether to massively increase spending on border security, including a possible doubling of the Border Patrol to about 40,000 agents. With more than $107 billion spent on securing the border over the last seven years, Homeland Security has regularly faced criticism by government audit and budget agencies for ineffective cost oversight.
 
Customs and Border Protection officials didn't answer queries from The Republic for a detailed explanation of the cost of the Ajo housing. In a written statement, CBP said that the projects followed federal laws, rules and regulations, and that "CBP chose to build housing because quality, affordable housing was not available in the area."
 
Even before the housing project was built, similar questions arose. In December 2010, Pima County Administrator C.H. Huckelberry complained in a letter to the project manager that a draft environmental assessment "does not contain any cost comparisons," making it impossible to substantiate the CBP's claim that renovating existing housing would be more expensive than building new housing. Huckelberry could not be reached for comment Thursday.
 
The assessment, by the General Services Administration, the agency that manages most federal property, briefly discussed alternatives such as building homes on existing federal property in Lukeville, 38 miles away near the Sonoyta border crossing, or near the Border Patrol station in Why, 11 miles from Ajo. But the assessment didn't include detailed cost estimates.
 
Ajo, a town of about 4,400, sits amid piles of mine tailings about 40 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border. Since the New Cornelia mine closed in 1983, the town has struggled. A GSA assessment for the housing project said that fewer than 30 percent of the CBP personnel assigned to the area rented in the Ajo market before the construction, and that there wasn't adequate housing for agents and officers, a claim some local realtors and property owners have disputed.
 
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, between 2007 and 2011 nearly 30 percent of the houses in Ajo were vacant. Both Grijalva and Barber said that they see a value in making it easier for agents and Customs officers to live in the community and in ensuring they have adequate housing. But both also said the government needs to protect against wasteful spending.
 
Grijalva said that his office had previously suggested CBP look at renovating existing housing stock in Ajo. His letter to DHS also raised questions about spending on private detention facilities for undocumented immigrants; it cited The Republic's story as an example of the need for DHS to release more information that can explain why its expenses are justified.
 
"This looks like a classic example of spending money without worrying about the cost or consequences," Grijalva said.
 
Contributing: Dan Nowicki of The Republic

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
Happy
0 0 %
Sad
0 0 %
Excited
0 0 %
Sleepy
0 0 %
Angry
0 0 %
Surprise
0 0 %