What’s your metabolism personality type?

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Do you have trouble losing weight? Are you constantly struggling to drop 10 to 20 pounds? Maybe it's not you but your metabolism.
 
Part of the problem for many people is they have a "broken metabolism," because they may not have been physically active enough for years, says James Hill, founding executive director of the Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at the University of Colorado in Denver.
 
He and obesity researcher Holly Wyatt have written State of Slim: Fix Your Metabolism and Drop 20 Pounds in 8 Weeks on the Colorado Diet with Christie Aschwanden, to help people fix their metabolisms.
 
The book suggests that people work up to doing 70 minutes of moderate physical activity a day, six days a week. The diet plan outlines a low-carb diet that dieters follow for two weeks and then they gradually increase the types of foods they eat as they increase their exercise.
 
Here's how the authors identify three metabolism-personality types and what these folks can do to trim down:
 
Easy gainers
 
Their problem: These folks feel like they have to eat perfectly to lose weight. They religiously follow a diet — being hyper-vigilant about what they eat — and the pounds peel off, but the moment they start indulging they gain it back.
 
The solution: Easy gainers need to move their bodies more and learn to eat smarter so they don't have to spend every waking minute thinking about food.
 
Healthy overfuelers
 
Their problem: They eat very healthfully but never lose weight. They eat the right kinds of foods including whole-grain breads, fish, grilled chicken, lots of vegetables, berries, almonds, natural peanut butter, hummus and nuts. They steer clear of sugary soft drinks and processed foods, and only occasionally allow themselves indulgences such as low-fat frozen yogurt and pudding. They do a moderate amount of physical activity. They have mastered the art of weight maintenance but skipped the weight-loss step.
 
The solution: They need to get the weight off and the quickest way to do that is to reduce food intake for a few weeks. This might include phase 1 (a low-carb diet) and phase 2 (more foods added back to the eating plan) of the Colorado Diet, outlined in the book. After they lose the weight, they might only need to step up their physical activity a little since they already are regular exercisers.
 
Aging gainers
 
Their problem: It's an unfortunate fact of life that as you get older, your muscle mass naturally begins to decrease — by 5% to 10% a decade after about age 40. Consequently the number of calories you burn decreases, and many tend to put on some fat. While exercise can help reduce loss of muscle with aging, exercise can't prevent it totally. It's a process that happens so gradually that you may not notice it until one day, you wake up with a pot belly.
 
The solution: A sluggish metabolism may feel like an added insult to an aging body, but unlike thinning hair, it's a problem you can do something about. The solution involves changes to both physical activity and diet. You have to ramp up your activity even more. You also have to eat smarter so your diet matches your changing metabolism.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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NYC announces largest gun bust in city history

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An undercover operation in New York has resulted in the largest seizure of illegal firearms in city history — and has provided more ammunition in the city's defense of its controversial stop-and-frisk policy, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Monday.
 
Police seized 254 illegal guns and indicted 19 people, Bloomberg said. The weapons included high-capacity assault weapons, a fully automatic machine gun and handguns, "which are most typically the models of guns used to commit violent crimes" in the city, Bloomberg said.
 
Two major defendants, operating independently, made numerous trips over the last year between their home states and New York City, personally transporting as many as 14 illegal firearms at a time using economy bus lines operating in the vicinity of Manhattan's Chinatown, police said in a statement.
 
Sales generally took place within hours of Walter Walker, 29, of Sanford, N.C., and Earl Campbell, 24, of Rock Hill, S.C., arriving in New York with a load of guns, police said.
 
Sixteen arrests were made in New York City, North Carolina and South Carolina in a series of apprehensions that began Aug. 2, the mayor's office said. The other three suspects were already in custody on unrelated charges.
 
Bloomberg said court-authorized wiretaps helped investigators identifiy the gun sellers in North and South Carolina attempting to supply guns for the purpose of reselling the weapons in New York City.
 
Bloomberg also provided a transcript of a comment attributed to suspect Campbell in a wiretap that indicated the city's controversial "stop and frisk" policy made selling weapons in the city more difficult: "I can't leave until you come, cause I can't take them (guns) to my house, to my side of town cause I'm in Brownsville (a section of Brooklyn). So we got like, whatchamacallit, stop and frisk."
 
Last week a federal judge ruled that the city's policy was unconstitutional because it disproportionately targets blacks and Hispanics. The city is appealing Judge Shira Scheindlin's decision, arguing the policy targets high-crime neighborhoods and rejecting Scheindlin's finding that the policy is a form of "indirect racial profiling."
 
More than half of the weapons seized were funneled to the city from North Carolina, with the remainder brought into New York City from South Carolina, Bloomberg said. Both states have relatively weak laws that allow criminals and traffickers to easily obtain guns, he said.
 
One of the discount bus companies charges $60 one-way from Raleigh, N.C., to New York. The fare is about half that charged by Greyhound, which, unlike the Chinatown buses, requires identification for boarding.
 
Walker met two times last year with the middleman and the undercover officer at a Brooklyn recording studio to sell the undercover firearms, the indictment said. He also allegedly sold weapons to the undercover officer in April in Manhattan.
 
In January, the undercover met with Campbell and his girlfriend, who was carrying assault rifle parts in her zebra-striped suitcase, authorities said. The girlfriend tried to assemble the weapon using an instructional video she called up on her smartphone. When she failed, the undercover bought the pieces anyway for $1,100.
 
One defendant, Jeremiah Devon McDougald, is accused of robbing someone at gunpoint while on the run from authorities in North Carolina, triggering an extensive manhunt. He was arrested on Aug. 7 and faces additional charges in North Carolina in connection with the robbery, police said.
 
Another defendant who became a fugitive, Chris Hill, evaded arrest for nearly two weeks before he was arrested Aug. 14 in Sanford, N.C. Police said Hill had a gun when he was arrested, and now faces additional charges as a felon in possession of a firearm in North Carolina.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Obamas welcome new puppy named Sunny

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There's a new set of little footsteps scampering around the White House grounds.
 
The Obamas have welcomed a new puppy into the household, a year-old Portuguese water dog named Sunny, according to the White House blog.
 
Sunny, a girl, is of the same breed as Bo, the Obamas' boy dog that was a gift from the late senator Ted Kennedy, D-Mass. The White House released photos and video of Bo and Sunny frolicking together today on the White House grounds.
 
First lady Michelle Obama tweeted out at about 8 p.m. ET, "So excited to introduce the newest member of the Obama family — our puppy, Sunny!"
 
The White House blog says Michelle Obama believed Bo was not getting enough playful interaction with other dogs and in October, she even organized a doggie play date for their fluffy black pooch.
 
Sunny arrived at the White House on Monday. She was born in June 2012 in Michigan, according to the blog.
 
"We suspect Sunny will follow in Bo's footsteps and keep the President company in the Oval Office, go for walks with the First Family after their 6:30 family dinner and even jump up on the first lady's lap from time to time," the blog read.
 
The Obamas are making a donation to the Washington Humane Society in Sunny's honor, according to the blog.
 

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Creditors file objections to Detroit’s bankruptcy

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DETROIT — Dozens of creditors, unions and retiree groups Monday objected to Detroit's eligibility to file for Chapter 9 bankruptcy, setting up a fierce legal battle that will determine whether the city's bankruptcy case can proceed.
 
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes, who set Monday as a deadline for objections, plans to hold a trial Oct. 23 to hear arguments about whether the city has a right to file for bankruptcy.
 
The objections, which were widely expected and numbered nearly 100 by 7 p.m. Monday, attacked Detroit's financial standing, its legal authority to file for bankruptcy and the process leading up to its July 18 filing.
 
Several objectors said the city is not eligible for bankruptcy because Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr plans to pursue reduced pension payments during the bankruptcy.
 
In Chapter 9, eligibility objections often trigger protracted legal fights that can add months to the case. If the judge rules the city is not eligible for bankruptcy, the case would be dismissed, although most bankruptcy experts believe Rhodes will rule the city is eligible.
 
To qualify for bankruptcy, the city must meet several criteria. For example, the city must prove it is insolvent and must show that it negotiated "in good faith" with its creditors or that it's no longer practical to negotiate. The city also must prove that it has the state's authority to file for bankruptcy.
 
The city's largest creditors, its two independently controlled pension boards, were expected to file a joint objection but had not done so by 7 p.m. Monday.
 
The objectors included the city's largest union, the Michigan chapter of the American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees, which attacked Chapter 9 bankruptcy as unconstitutional and accused Orr of refusing to negotiate in good faith with the city's creditors.
 
AFSCME attorneys said Detroit designed an "unconstitutional, unlawfully authorized Chapter 9 proceeding seeking the haven of bankruptcy to illegally attempt to slash pension and other post-employment benefit obligations and cram such reductions down the throats of current and former city employees."
 
Bill Nowling, a spokesman for Orr, said last week that the city expects objections and believes it will prevail in its bid to prove the city is eligible.
 
The UAW, which four years ago helped General Motors Co. and Chrysler emerge from bankruptcy by making labor concessions, filed an objection.
 
The Retired Detroit Police & Fire Fighters Association and the Detroit Retired City Employees Association, which collectively represent about 70 percent of the city's approximately 21,000 retirees, also objected.
 
Several dozen individual retirees, identifying themselves as interested parties or possible creditors, filed objections using a form letter that argued Detroit didn't have the state's authority to file for bankruptcy.
 
"The city of Detroit has too many assets to be bankrupt," wrote Detroit retiree and pension holder Olivia Gillon in her objection. "Detroit is no different than hundreds of other American cities that are cash strapped and want to get their hands on retiree pension funds. If the federal court allows our pension fund to be raided, it will open a flood gate for hundreds of other cities."
 
Some retirees filed handwritten letters objecting to the city's filing. Several public figures objected, too, including former Detroit corporation counsel and recent mayoral candidate Krystal Crittendon, the Rev. Charles Williams II, president of the Detroit chapter of the National Action Network, and political consultant Sam Riddle.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Obama faces a challenging post-vacation agenda

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President Obama faces a full agenda when he returns from vacation this weekend, one that includes budget battles and health care fights — and that was before Egypt descended into near-chaos this week.
 
Pressuring Egypt's military government into holding new elections is the latest addition to a crowded fall political calendar that could make or break Obama's second term.
 
The president is scheduled to return Sunday evening from his week-long vacation at Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
 
In the days and months ahead, Obama will seek to put in place key parts of his health care law, pursue a landmark immigration bill, and — perhaps most important in the short run — avoid a government shutdown and another crisis over the debt ceiling.
 
The president's to-do list also includes pushing a jobs and middle-class legislative package and defending surveillance programs conducted by the National Security Agency.
 
At a pre-vacation news conference, Obama said he didn't expect congressional Republicans to back a government shutdown "at a time when the recovery is getting some traction" and jobs are starting to come back.
 
"I have confidence that common sense, in the end, will prevail," Obama said.
 
He added: "We'll see what happens."
 
Congressional Republicans said they don't want a government shutdown either, but that Obama needs to support bigger spending cuts in a new budget plan.
 
"Our good friends on the other side of the aisle have been spending the entire year trying to get us to walk away from spending reductions that we committed to on a bipartisan basis just a couple of years ago," said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.
 
Obama, meanwhile, wants to end the automatic, across-the-board cuts known as sequestration.
 
The dispute hits a major deadline on Sept. 30. when the current fiscal year ends, as does the temporary spending plan that is now funding the government. Without at least a new continuing resolution, the government could shut down on Oct. 1.
 
Moreover, some conservative Republicans are advocating a shutdown if Congress does not end funding for Obama's new landmark health care law, another major item on the president's fall plate.
 
In October, the administration will begin attempts to sign up uninsured Americans for new health care marketplaces coming on line. In addition, at some point this fall, Congress will have to raise the current debt ceiling, which is around $16.7 trillion.
 
Obama has said, repeatedly, he will not negotiate to raise the debt ceiling, noting that it enables the government to pay bills already rung up.
 
Some congressional Republicans say the debt ceiling issue can be used to leverage more budget cuts from the administration. Two years ago, a debt ceiling standoff led to a near-default and a downgrade in the nation's credit rating.
 
On Sunday, though, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., spoke out against a shutdown. "I don't think shutting down the government is a good idea, but I do think that we were elected, conservatives were elected, to try to stop this overreach, this government takeover of health care," Paul told Fox News Sunday.
 
The upcoming fall political season will see a renewed Obama effort to secure another major piece of legislation, an immigration bill. As he has in recent months, the president is planning to pressure House Republicans to sign off on the immigration bill approved by the Senate earlier this year.
 
Many House Republicans say a key a provision of that Senate bill — a pathway to citizenship for people already in the United States illegally — amounts to amnesty for lawbreakers.
 
Obama is likely to cite some of these issues this week when he embarks on a two-day bus tour of upstate New York and northeastern Pennsylvania. The president is also expected to stress education and jobs proposals.
 
Foreign affairs are no less crowded for the administration in the coming months.
 
Over the next few months, Obama faces the prospects of rising instability in Egypt, an escalating civil war in Syria and increasingly testy relations with Russia.
 
During the first week in September, he is scheduled to fly to St. Petersburg, Russia, for a Group of 20 nations summit, where a still-struggling global economy tops the agenda.
 
Even though the G-20 summit is in Russia, a meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin is not on the schedule. Obama canceled a planned summit with Putin in Moscow after a string of differences that included Russia's decision to grant temporary asylum to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.
 
Snowden's leaks led to criticism of NSA tactics, and Obama has said he will work with Congress on potential improvements to surveillance programs.
 
Outside events can always intrude on a president's time, as they did this week during his vacation in Martha's Vineyard.
 
After Egypt's interim military government cracked down on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, Obama responded by canceling plans for joint U.S.-Egyptian military exercises. He alluded to other potential aid cuts if the military government does not follow through on pledges to call new elections and re-install a democratically elected government.
 
"Going forward," Obama said, "I've asked my national security team to assess the implications of the actions taken by the interim government and further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the U.S.-Egyptian relationship."

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Partner of reporter who broke NSA stories detained

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The domestic partner of the journalist who broke a series of stories revealing mass surveillance programs by the U.S. National Security Agency was held for almost nine hours Sunday by British authorities at London's Heathrow airport on his way home to Rio de Janeiro.
 
David Miranda, a Brazilian citizen who lives with The Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald, was returning through London from a trip to Berlin when he was stopped under a controversial British law. The law applies only at airports, ports and border areas and allows officers to stop, search, question and detain individuals.
 
The Guardian reports that Miranda, 28, was held for the maximum the law allows before officers must release or formally arrest the individual. According to official figures, only one in 2,000 people detained are kept for more than six hours, the Guardian said.
 
Scotland Yard released little information, saying only that Miranda was detained at 8:05 a.m. Sunday and released at 5 p.m. No arrest was made. Officials confiscated electronics equipment including his mobile phone, laptop, camera, memory sticks, DVDs and games consoles, the Guardian website said.
 
Greenwald, an American, has written a series of stories revealing the NSA's electronic surveillance programs and national security programs in Britain, most based on information passed to him by Edward Snowden. Snowden, an American granted temporary asylum in Russia, is a wanted man in the United States.
 
"This is a profound attack on press freedoms and the news-gathering process," Greenwald said of Miranda's detention. He said the treatment of Miranda was "clearly intended to send a message of intimidation to those of us who have been reporting on the NSA" and similar activities in Britain.
 
Sergio Danese, undersecretary for consular affairs at Brazil's Foreign Ministry, told The New York Times that Brazil's consul general and embassy officials helped resolve the situation. Miranda did leave England for Brazil, where Miranda and Greenwald live, Danese said.
 
"We were satisfied with him being liberated," he told the Times.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Mexico’s new drug war strategy: More of the same

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MEXICO CITY (AP) — With the capture of two top drug lords in little more than a month, the new government of President Enrique Pena Nieto is following an old strategy it openly criticized for causing more violence and crime.
 
Mario Armando Ramirez Trevino, a top leader of Mexico's Gulf Cartel, was detained Saturday in a military operation near the Texas border, just weeks after the arrest of the leader of the brutal Zetas cartel near another border city, Nuevo Laredo.
 
Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong took his post in December saying the strategy of former President Felipe Calderon to take out cartel leaders only made drug gangs more dangerous and violent. The new administration would focus less on leaders and more on reducing violence, he said.
 
Yet the new strategy appears almost identical to the old. The captures of Ramirez and top Zeta Miguel Angel Trevino Morales could cause a new spike in violence with battles over leadership of Mexico's two major cartels.
 
"The strategy of the military is exactly the same," Raul Benitez, a security expert at Mexico's National Autonomous University, said Sunday. "It's not a failure of the new government. It's the reality they face … Changing strategy is a very slow process. In the short term, you have to act against the drug-trafficking leaders."
 
Federal security spokesman Eduardo Sanchez insisted at a news conference Sunday that there have been key changes in strategy. Most important, he said, is an unprecedented coordination among security entities, including federal police, the attorney general, branches of the military and state governments.
 
"They have consensus on many activities and because of that we've had many important advances that are exactly what we wanted. And we can talk today about a 20% drop in killings related to organized crime compared to the past," he said, citing numbers that many people have questioned, given the continual daily body count in hot spots around the country.
 
Sanchez said the government expects a readjustment in the cartels with the new vacuum in leadership and has put forces in place in Tamaulipas to help prevent that. He would not say who the government thinks will take over the Gulf cartel.
 
Ramirez, 52, a drug boss in Reynosa, across the border from McAllen, Texas, had been vying to take over the cartel since the arrest of the gang's top capo, Jorge Eduardo Costilla Sanchez, alias "El Coss," last September. Some say Ramirez succeeded by reportedly killing his main Gulf rival, Miguel Villarreal, known as "Gringo Mike," in a gunbattle in March. Villarreal's death is still disputed by some.
 
The U.S. State Department has offered a reward of $5 million for the capture of Ramirez for several federal drug violations. Sanchez said he didn't know of any extradition request, but that authorities are checking.
 
The once-powerful Gulf cartel still controls most of the cocaine and marijuana trafficking through the Matamoros corridor across the border from Brownsville, Texas, and has an international reach into Central America and beyond. But the cartel has been plagued by infighting since Costilla's arrest, while also being under attack in its home territory by its former security arm, the Zetas.
 
The split is blamed for much of the violence in Reynosa, where there have been regular, public shootouts between Gulf factions and authorities the last six months. The factions are willing to fight for the largest piece of the lucrative business of transporting illegal drugs to the biggest market, the United States. Mexico continues to be the No. 1 foreign supplier of marijuana and methamphetamines to the U.S. An estimated 93% of South American cocaine headed to the U.S. travels through Mexico, according to 2010 FBI statistics.
 
Before leaving office, Calderon repeatedly touted the fact that his forces had captured 25 of Mexico's 37 most-wanted drug lords, a strategy backed by the U.S. government with hundreds of millions of dollars in funding and close cooperation with American law-enforcement, military and intelligence agencies.
 
With that strategy, Osorio Chong said the cartels had dispersed their leadership which "has made them more violent and much more dangerous."
 
The new government also said it was going to limit the widespread and casual access that U.S. agents had to Mexican forces under Calderon.
 
But security analysts agree that close cooperation between the Mexican military and the U.S. continues along the border, despite messages from Mexico City. The coordinated efforts to track and capture Zeta leader Trevino started under Calderon and continued, said George Grayson, a College of William & Mary professor who has written extensively on the Gulf and Zetas cartels.
 
Sanchez said Sunday that no intelligence or data from any other country was used in the capture of Ramirez. He offered no details of the operation, but said the arrests of 24 of Ramirez's associates Aug. 12 added to the information the government already had collected in tracking the cartel boss's whereabouts.
 
"Enrique Pena Nieto would really like to not be going after capos," Grayson said Sunday. "He wants to change the agenda. He doesn't want the headlines to be about capos."
 
But, Grayson said, the government hasn't been able to get drug violence out of the headlines because of the fighting along the border and in states like Michoacan, where two other cartels are battling over territory.
 
The new administration's tactic in Michoacan also has mirrored that of Calderon: sending more troops and federal police to try to regain control, even while saying the focus is on crime prevention to bring down violence.
 
"It's a campaign slogan, a political discourse designed to convince the public," Benitez said. "They're giving very few resources to the prevention campaign."

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Bear killed, DNA will show if it attacked Mich. girl

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Read Time:2 Minute, 52 Second
DETROIT — Conservation officers shot and killed a black bear over the weekend and plan tests to see whether it's the animal that chased and mauled a 12-year-old girl as she jogged on her grandfather's wooded land in northern Michigan, authorities say.
 
However, her grandfather doesn't think the animal killed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources is the right one.
 
"It was a real large bear," said Dave Wetherell, 66, on Sunday. "But I don't believe it was the same bear. This one here was between 400-500 pound, the one they killed last night. They feel like the one who attacked Abby was 150 pounds."
 
STORY: 12-year-old girl attacked by bear while running
 
Abigail Wetherell was attacked Thursday while she was out running on the approximately 180 acres her paternal grandparents own in Wexford County's Haring Township, Mich., near Cadillac. Her screams summoned help and the bear was chased away.
 
She suffered serious cuts and puncture wounds on her thigh and was released from Munson Medical Center in Traverse City, Mich., on Sunday.
 
After the attack, the DNR said it would track down and kill the bear and test the body for rabies and other communicable diseases.
 
Michigan conservation officers Sam Koscinski and Holly Pennoni killed a bear early Sunday morning after responding to a bear complaint about 11:30 p.m. Saturday in nearby Selma Township. A man had shot and wounded the animal on his property "because he perceived the bear to be a threat to his life," according to a Department of Natural Resources news release issued Sunday.
 
"We don't know if that's the bear that hurt her," said department spokesman Ed Golder on Sunday evening. "We're going to evaluate through forensic tests."
 
The paw prints were similar, he said.
 
Bears are a protected species in Michigan and cannot be shot unless they pose an immediate threat.
 
Fur samples from the bear, which was killed approximately 2 miles from where the girl was attacked, will be matched at the department's Wildlife Disease Laboratory in Lansing, Mich., against DNA samples taken from Abigail's clothing and the scene.
 
The department is keeping bear traps in the vicinity and monitoring bear activity in the area.
 
Regardless, Abigail is happily home.
 
"She's in high spirits," her grandfather said. "She's really sore, but nothing but a bunch of smiles. She understands she was in a lot of danger and she beat it. She's very strong person."
 
Nor will the terror of the bear attack keep the seventh-grader from running.
 
"I don't think it will hold her down, but I don't think she'll run to our cabin anymore," Wetherell said. "She realizes that's why the bear chased her, because she was running."
 
Michigan is home to about 8,000 to 10,000 black bears, 90% of which live in the Upper Peninsula, according to the Department of Natural Resources. The area of Wexford County in the Lower Peninsula where Thursday's attack occurred does have an established bear population.

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Petition drive to recall San Diego mayor begins

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SAN DIEGO (AP) — A campaign to oust embattled San Diego Mayor Bob Filner began Sunday, as volunteers armed with clipboards and petitions fanned out to collect thousands of signatures needed to authorize a recall election.
 
More than a dozen women have publicly accused Filner, a Democrat, of making inappropriate statements or sexual advances. The 70-year-old former congressman has resisted numerous calls to resign.
 
He is set to return to work this week after undergoing behavior therapy.
 
"He is a sexual predator. He has abused the power of his office," said Rachel Laing, spokeswoman for the recall campaign. "He can't possibly lead or possibly reclaim his ability to lead."
 
Recall organizers say they have raised more than $100,000 so far and more than 1,100 people have signed up to volunteer. They sought out signatures at a half-marathon Sunday in Balboa Park, while businesswomen and military sexual-assault victims planned to lead an afternoon march downtown.
 
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi has said Filner should step aside and spare San Diego the pain and expense of a recall election.
 
The latest accusation against Filner came Thursday, when a volunteer city worker who assists senior citizens said the mayor repeatedly rubbed her hands, asked her on dates and made sexually suggestive comments.
 
The recall petitions include Filner's response, filed Monday with the city clerk, in which he tells voters this is "not the time to go backwards" and touts his administration's job-producing projects and quality of life initiatives, like removing cars from Balboa Park and proposing that the 2024 Olympic Games be held in San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico.
 
Filner made no mention of the allegations against him in his response. He has said in the past that he has disrespected women but has denied being guilty of sexual harassment.
 
The recall effort must collect 101,597 signatures of registered San Diego voters by Sept. 26. If the petition has fewer than that, the recall campaign will have 30 more days to circulate a supplemental petition to gather additional valid signatures.
 
If enough signatures are validated by the city clerk, the petition will be presented to the City Council, which must schedule an election within 60 to 90 days.
 
Filner has stayed out of sight, but his lawyers said he completed two weeks of intensive behavior therapy.
 
Earlier this month, Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer sent a letter to Filner, urging him to step down from office.
 
"You have betrayed the trust of the women you have victimized, the San Diegans you represent and the people you have worked with throughout your decades in public life," she wrote.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Idaho wildfire near Sun Valley now over 100,000 acres

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Hundreds of fresh firefighters have swarmed to central Idaho, where the stubborn Beaver Creek fire near ski and recreational mecca Sun Valley had swollen to more than 100,000 acres Sunday and was threatening the area due to high winds.
 
About 300 firefighters from across the country joined about 900 currently fighting the stubborn, 10-day old blaze, which continues to threaten one of the West's most popular recreation areas. About 2,250 residences near Hailey and Ketchum have been evacuated. Ketchum and Sun Valley remain under pre-evacuation warning as Forest Service crews, coupled with local fire departments and private crews hired by insurers and homeowners, battle both the main blaze, spot fires and protect homes from being consumed.
 
The efforts come as firefighters grapple with nearly 40 large fires in nine states, including two other pesky Idaho fires; the Pony Complex fire about 12 miles south of Mountain Home — which has torched nearly 150,000 acres but is 95% contained — and the Elk Complex fire in the Boise National Forest, which has consumed about 126,000 acres about 12 miles southwest of Pine but is 55% contained.
 
The Beaver Creek Fire has destroyed only two structures have been destroyed since Thursday. But it remains a threat along a 20-mile stretch of Idaho Highway 75, the two-lane road that's the state's main north-south artery from the Nevada border to southwest Montana. The lightning-caused fire grew from about 92,000 acres Saturday to nearly 101,000 acres, or an area about 160 square miles, by Sunday afternoon.
 
Forest Service spokeswoman Ludi Bond says the blaze is about 9% contained. Higher humidity and lower winds Saturday night and early Sunday helped slow the fire's growth along its southern end, where crews were mopping up blackened foothills west of Hailey.
 
"We're doing whatever we can to slow it down, dropping retardant, building containment lines, taking care of weak spots and destroying whatever vegetation that could ignite and feed fire,'' Bond said.
 
Seven helicopters are assigned to the fire. Both of the nation's massive DC-10 retardant bombers have also been used, but one experienced an engine malfunction after a drop Thursday and remains unavailable.
 
Still, firefighters were bracing for more trouble Sunday ahead of a forecast for higher winds which could fan the main blaze and ignite more spot fires in dry tinder canyons and gulches along the Big Wood River Valley.
 
At St. Luke's Wood River Medical Center, a 25-bed hospital 2 miles south of Ketchum, patients were evacuated to a Twin Falls care facility and only the emergency room was open. Meanwhile, bulldozers were digging fire-prevention trenches and two helicopters were dropping fire retardant 200 feet from the building, said spokeswoman Tanya Keim.
 
Ketchum, the main town adjacent to Sun Valley, remained a ghost town Sunday, with scores of businesses closed and tourists and many of its 2,700 residents fleeing. The Ketchum-Sun Valley area is a second-home paradise for Hollywood A-listers, including Tom Hanks and Bruce Willis.
 
Dozens of retail shops, bars, outdoor cafes and restaurants on the town's main street are closed. Even The Casino, the city's oldest bar, was shuttered.
 
"I've never seen it like this," said Dale Byington, general manager and 23-year veteran of The Sawtooth Club.
 
"The only reason I opened was to give people here a place to go and get some food and drink, but that's not going to happen," Byington said.
 
Blaine County spokeswoman Bronwyn Nickel said August is the area's most popular month for tourists. Ketchum will be particularly hard-hit by the losses, she said.
 
Some residents, who evacuated days ago, are antsy to return home. But the county has issued warnings that homeowners are not to return until it's safe. National Guard troops arrived Sunday to man checkpoints at evacuated neighborhoods and help relieve local law enforcement officers.
 
Luckily, only a handful of firefighters have been injured, mostly heat-related.
 
"It was a good day from the standpoint that we had no injuries, no lives lost, and no homes and property burned," Bond said. "Firefighters have been going house-to-house to decrease the risk. We're simply not going to leave homes unprotected."

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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