Nigeria News

Fleeing Boko Haram Calls For Ceasefire

Members of the Islamist terror group, Boko Haram that are running away from the fire-power of Nigerian troops are calling for ceasefire and immediate stop to hostilities.

The group that has lost almost all their camps in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa are reportedly distributing flyers in Potiskum and Yobe areas in Adamawa state asking for ceasefire as they are fleeing for safety. But observers are skeptical of the calls for ceasefire since even as Nigerian military regains key towns lost to Boko Haram last week, the insurgent group stoops to even bloodier tactics

The $1Billion request from President Jonathan was delayed by the House of Representative for nearly 5 Months and Nigerians lost over 148 soldiers using war equipment used during the Biafran war.

In the last three weeks, the war planes, attack Helicopters, armoured vehicles with Night vision, Body armour for the Boys ordered have arrived and the Boko Haram and their supporters are not finding it funny.

Nearly 400 Members of Boko haram got drowned last week while trying to escape through the Lake Chad river.


The Ndokwa Neku Union (NNU) Youth Wing over the weekend in a meeting with Ndokwa community youth leaders advocates for more support and cooperation, majorly from boko haram affected communities in the North East as our gallant soldiers descends heavily on the blood sucking demons called boko haram.

The apex Ndokwa Youth body in a statement by its spokesman, Pedro Obi, noted that with 100% cooperation of major stakeholders cutting across political, traditional and religious line in the North East, Boko Haram will soon be history.

While commending the Multi – National Joint Task Force on the success recorded thus far in the fight against insurgents, the body equally called on all Nigerian people, most especially our Northern brothers to support the Federal Government in this fight against a united Nigeria.

Boko Haram Sends Out Child Suicide Bombers

Chadian soldiers on top of a truck, left, speak to Cameroon soldiers, right, standing next to the truck, on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria as they form part of the force to combat regional Islamic extremists force's including Boko Haram, near the town of Gambarou, Nigeria, Feb. 19, 2015.

As the fight against the militant Islamist insurgent group, Boko Haram, progresses in fits and starts. Victory one day is eclipsed by defeat the next. On Saturday Feb. 21, Nigeria’s military spokesman tweeted that the army had retaken the border town of Baga after a fierce battle with the group’s fighters.

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But even as soldiers continued with the “mopping up” operation, residents elsewhere in the area reported scores of deaths at the hands of Boko Haram militants. And a day later, on Feb. 22, a suicide bomber killed five and wounded dozens in the northeast town of Potiskum, about 210 miles away. Though Boko Haram has yet to claim responsibility for the attack, the devastation was caused by what is rapidly becoming the group’s signature calling card: a female bomber, who, according to witnesses speaking to Reuters, looked to be no more than eight years old.

Though Boko Haram reportedly has enough firepower to successfully raid several Nigerian military garrisons, its ability to wreak terror is just as important in an asymmetric war like this one. United States intelligence officials estimate that Boko Haram has only 4000-6000 “hardcore” fighters, but a succession of attacks across Nigeria’s northeast and across the borders of its neighboring countries has nonetheless demonstrated the group’s seeming ability to be everywhere at once. The Nigerian military has a hard time keeping up, leaving many civilians caught in the middle. Few support Boko Haram, which has left a trail of massacres and abductions as it seeks to impose on the region its interpretation of Islamic law, but even fewer dare stand up to the group without a military to protect them.

Help is on the way: the African Union has pledged 8,750 soldiers, police and humanitarian officials to the fight. Already Nigeria’s neighbors Chad, Niger, and Cameroon, have entered the fray, defeating the insurgents in border areas and denying Boko Haram the sanctuary it once enjoyed. But Nigeria’s military is faced with an uncompromising deadline. National Security Advisor Sambo Dasuki has pledged that Boko Haram will be defeated before the March 28 presidential election, which was postponed from February for security reasons. That gives the army six weeks to do what it hasn’t been able to achieve in the six years since the insurgency launched.

Regaining Baga is a start. Strategically speaking, the fishing town offers little military advantage. Symbolically, it packs a punch. Boko Haram took Baga on January 3, in a surprise raid that sent soldiers tasked with protecting a nearby military garrison fleeing for their lives. Over the course of the next few days Boko Haram methodically rampaged through neighboring villages, killing and burning everything in its path. At the time, local officials estimated that up to 2000 residents had been killed; a government assessment put the number at 150. With access to the area limited and phone coverage all but cut off, it was impossible to establish which number was closer to the truth. Satellite imagery released by Amnesty International a few days later showed widespread devastation that gave credence to the higher count, though it is also possible that many residents fled before Boko Haram arrived.

Still, the discrepancy was largely interpreted as a government effort to downplay the insurgency’s strength, and the military’s failure. Now that Baga has been re-taken, investigators will be able to get closer to the truth of what actually happened. That may be of little comfort to those who lost loved ones and property in the massacre, but in the battle of messaging, it’s a start.

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