Law and Order

Honour and shame: two sides of the stigma coin

I had a conversation yesterday with a friend about domestic violence within the Muslim community in the Africa and western countries and the issue of why some Muslims resist discussing what they know is happening in the company of non-Muslims. In my friend’s view, challenging Muslims, and Muslim men in particular, about domestic violence in such an open space, where non-Muslims are present, is problematic because of the current socio-political climate within the country, including widespread Islamophobia. She felt that a public naming of the problem would be hijacked by those with a racist agenda to further demonize Muslims in the eyes of the  public, for instance by accusing Muslims of having barbaric cultures.

While I don’t disagree that this hijacking is likely, I remain unconvinced that this is sufficient justification for not being vocal about violence against Muslim women in a relevant forum such as a meeting with the police on ‘community safety’ for one key reason: I believe advocating silence makes one complicit in the stigmatization of the victims. This stigmatization, in turn, is closely related to ideas about honour and shame that undermine women’s rights. Muslim women must start now to be vocal on the treatemnt they recieve from their husband or men which is a pure violation of human right.

Anthony-Claret Onwutalobi
Anthony-Claret Onwutalobi
Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC and CEO of Portia Web Solutions. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
https://www.codewit.com

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