Photo of The Policeman who’s Ear was bitten off by a Woman In Lagos

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Read Time:17 Second

My question whenever i look at this is always what was the policeman doing when a lady got her mouths to his ear?…Dis she promise him a kiss or wanted to whisper to his ear?.. This is the height of unprofessionalism…that being said, the lady in question should be severely dealt with.

 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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SHOCKING VIDEO: Cameroonian man addicted to eating FAECES, DRINKING URINE AND SPERM

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Read Time:15 Second

We’ve heard and seen all kinds of weird sicknesses and addictions, but we’ve never seen anything like this.

The man in this video is addicted to eating faeces, drinking urine and sperm.

Please be warned: These video contains graphic contents.

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About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nigeria: Army Blocks Move By Boko Haram to Hoist Flag in Damaturu

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Read Time:2 Minute, 31 Second

Abuja — Security operatives of the Joint Task Force have thwarted an attempt by the Boko Haram Islamic sect to hoist what they said would have been their national flag, “a yellow, white and red stripes” with weapons of mass destruction inscribed, at the centre in Damaturu, Yobe State capital which sources said is scheduled to be the headquarters of the Boko Haram nation.

The disclosure was made just as security sources said indigenes of Borno, Bauchi, Yobe and other states harbouring the sect’s ‘cells’ are under immense pressure and fear owing to threats on them to support the group with funds by a percentage of their salaries or profits made from their businesses, which is said to be non negotiable.

Failure to remit such money is most times met with the killing of a loved member of that family or the family is wiped out. That is why the sources of funding for the Islamic sect have been difficult to trace, the source said.

Why Policemen, other security agents are targets

Another mode of funding for the sect, according to the security sources, is the daily killing of security agents particularly the police, soldiers of the JTF, armed Customs and Immigration officials.

Vanguard was told that there was a reward of N5,000 for each security personnel killed and if such a security agent killed has a rifle and the killer or killers succeed in collecting his rifle for the sect, the reward is N10, 000. Hence, the killing of security agents by members of the group is seen as a source of generating funds and acquiring arms and ammunition for the group.

According to the source, the source of arms for the sect members has also been traced to the porosity of the nation’s borders especially those of Niger, Chad and Cameroon through which most of the weapons used in the Arab Spring crises find their way to the country.

The source noted that allegation of killing of innocent indigenes, especially during crossfire with the sect by the JTF was ‘political talk’ especially since great efforts through intelligence and surveillance are carried out by the JTF before they strike.

The source added that such efforts had always yielded unquantifiable discoveries in large stockpile of IEDs, AK 47 rifles, GPMGs and hundreds of thousands of live ammunition.

Vanguard has, consequently, learnt that it was this mode of killing for financial benefits by Boko Haram adherents that has been the stumbling block to officers of security agencies, who when they are deployed to Maiduguri, Damaturu, Potiskum, Mubi, Bauchi, Jos and parts of Kaduna among others protest vehemently and embark on all sorts of lobbying to prevent their being posted to areas considered Boko Haram states.

It would be recalled that recent mass transfer of Police officers especially those from the South-East and South-South to parts of the North recently, experienced such protestations as most of the officers threatened to resign than allow themselves to be used as guinea pigs.

 

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Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Nigeria: Prayer Will Not Change Nigeria

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Read Time:6 Minute, 46 Second

In their famously controversial book, The Communist Manifesto, Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, described religion as the opium of the people which, when taken in right dosage, benumbs the body and soul to suffering, shame and sin.

The church, especially in Nigeria, has been so emblematic of the Marxian prognostication and turned otherwise educated men and women into robotic wimps, manipulated by pastor, prophets and prophetesses and recounting sometimes meaningless supplications to a creator, whose methods they hardly comprehend. The same goes for other religions, which have tended to follow a certain pattern that thoroughly negates all the principles of mutual and peaceful co-existence.

Just a few days ago, a friend complained that Nigeria is one of those third world countries where people worship all kinds of supernatural personalities and pray harder than they work yet criminals pervade the land and people perpetrate all kinds of heinous crimes even in the most sanctimonious of places and the country is retarded in growth. Meanwhile, some European countries, where less than 15% of the population recognise the existence of any gods and never bother to go to any place of worship, be it Sunday or Friday, are doing good, showing love and prospering as a people. It is this conundrum, which got so flagrantly played up in some of the media reports credited to President Goodluck Jonathan this week that has prompted this intervention.

Among all the stuff he was said to have said during the Independence Day celebrations, Mr. President reportedly declared a one year prayer session upon which we must now hinge the future and prosperity of Nigeria. First of all, I don’t understand why the president would make such a proposition to the hapless and long-suffering people of Nigeria on such an occasion. Some of us were dying to know how he intends to deal with some of the more pressing challenges facing the country, but not much came through.

Take the example of power. Paradoxically, most people were unable to watch the president’s Independence Day speech due to power outage and those who did paid dearly for it, literally, as the light was gone soon after never to return till the next day, if at all. For power, it’s all contracts, contracts and more contracts-even as we hope the water levels do not recede ultimately to show PHCN for what it truly is.

As far as I know, the Roman Catholic Church has been saying the “Prayer for Nigeria in Distress” for over two decades. Yet, neither the leaders nor the followers have changed. Former Head of State, Gen. Yakubu Gowon (rtd), has led a prayer project called “Nigeria Prays” for over 10 years and nothing seems to have changed. It is possible that quite a few of the new fangled churches take some time off their busy schedule (of praying for prosperity and such matters) to say a prayer or two for the country.

There are several hours of video footage and tonnes of press clippings showing several politicians, especially the Christians, visiting one religious leader or another seeking divine guidance or so it seems. Others have also been known to have visited some notorious shrines in the more seedy and dingy enclaves. But even so, and in spite of all of these, things haven’t got any better.

My second point is the rather wrong impression created by the president (by the way I didn’t say our president lied) by claiming that the United States of America made it to greatness through prayers. I reckon Mrs. Hilary Clinton didn’t bother to listen to the speeches, otherwise the Americans would have been protesting such glaring misinformation. Brothers and sisters, the US was built on hard work, passion, vision and an overwhelming quest to be the best. If at all, they must have prayed for longer days than nights so they could get more nation-building work done!

At this point, I pause to remember an anecdote about a protest by world leaders to God over His seeming preferential treatment of Nigerians by blessing them with good weather conditions and abundant natural resources. As the story goes, God smiled at the angry protesters and asked them to go back home and wait to see the kind of leaders He would send to Nigeria. Fabulous as this story may sound, Nigeria has had a rough ride with leadership since independence, but for one exception (Gen. Muhammadu Buhari’s era) but even so, not much was achieved while seeking to correct past mistakes.

As a country, we have so much natural resources and brilliant and hardworking people, but we don’t seem capable of feeding ourselves (less than 20% of the population of India) much less maintain a 100km road leading from Lagos to Ibadan! And the president wants us to pray?

Today, Nigerians are wracked by the menace of terrorism, armed robbery, kidnapping and now flooding. What exactly has the government done to deal with these core aspects of their Key Results Areas, aside inexplicable budgetary allocations and platitudes in the media? Yes, these may be inevitable with the gripping high unemployment figures, but what is the government doing to complement the effort of the few surviving private sector companies? Flooding may be a natural disaster, but didn’t we get warned by the Meteorological Agencies even as we all rue Global Warming? Yet, we allow the floods to wreak so much havoc, with the death toll rising from across the affected parts of the country and billions of naira worth of property damaged.

President Jonathan says we should pray, yet he’s not even been to any of the flooded zones, like George Bush of the same US did during Katrina and Obama has been doing all through the year as the elements ravaged the US.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I haven’t said that Nigerians should not pray. As a matter of fact, I am a firm believer in the efficacy of prayers. The only difference between me and some folks is that they believe that prayer answereth all problems. Hell no! For goodness sakes, pray if you want to pray, but do something. So, those who want to pray for 10 years can get on with it, if that’s what they have elected to do but they must realize that there are at least two clear risks in going that route. One, if we sheepishly get down on our knees and pray with our eyes closed, in a manner of speaking, those we have sent to represent us will prey on us (pardon the pun). Secondly, the natural resources we have were fortuitously granted by divine providence. I can admit so much.

However, we have to turn those raw materials into finished, profitably marketable goods, to make good sense of them. There is no amount of prayer that can turn water to wine in Nigeria of today. Even that was then, and in far away Galilee. If we can’t build or maintain our refineries, we will continue to export cheap crude and import expensive by-products, regardless of how long and how hard we pray.

So, I am totally not on this one with the president. I suggest he says just a little prayer to God for dependable, serious-minded and effective lieutenants who will help him take the country out of the dark woods where it is currently languishing clueless. In the meantime, I will say a prayer to God to grant our president the wisdom to see through the sycophancy of many of his assistants and acolytes and immediately appoint men and women of knowledge and passion who will help him make the difference rather than worry about their personal comfort and 2015.

I believe there are too many people telling the president only what he wants to hear and playing politics with the lives of Nigerians and the future of the country. President Jonathan can still make history, for all the right reasons, if he can hearken to the voices crying so bitterly and loudly in the Nigerian wilderness. Prayers won’t change Nigeria; affirmative and honest actions will.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Africa Loses One Million Tonnes of Fish Yearly Due to Illegal Fishing

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Read Time:2 Minute, 57 Second

Africa loses one million tonnes of fish per year due to overfishing and bad governance in the fisheries sector. The continent’s losses account for one-tenth of annual global losses, said Sumaila Rashid, Director of the Fisheries Centre at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

“That is the equivalent to 10 million cows a year,” he said, adding that, “Africa alone is losing one million tonnes a year.” According to the fisheries professor, the global fish harvest in 1950 was 10 million tonnes. The tonnage had been growing continually until it levelled in the 1980s at 60 to 70 million tonnes a year.

“The catch is actually declining. We invest more resources to catch less fish,” he said in a presentation he made during a roundtable discussion on harnessing fishery resources at the eighth African Development Forum on Wednesday.

If properly managed, fishery can provide more jobs and more income and feed up to 20 million malnourished people in the developing world, according to the presentation. But in order to fully benefit from the sector, the true value of these resources needs to be known; and adequate knowledge needs to be acquired about the state of fish stocks and the ecosystem that supports them, Mr. Rashid said.

As in other natural resources, Africa has been lagging in the use of its fishery resources. Up to 75 per cent of the continent’s resources are said to have been over or fully exploited.

Namibia, where marine fisheries contribute five per cent to the national GDP, seems to have a more or less comprehensive policy and strategy dealing with it.

According to Anna Erastus, Director, Policy and Planning, at Namibia’s Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources, with 70 per cent of the outputs being exported, fishery, which directly employs 13,500 people, is the second most important foreign exchange earner for the country.

Namibia has developed three strategies linked to governance and management of its fisheries industry, she said. These strategies cover issues related to rebuilding of stock, maximization of the benefits of fisheries, and establishment of effective fisheries management in terms of monitoring, control and surveillance systems.

The last strategy is an area which the rest of Africa also needed to strengthen, Mr. Rashid added.

“There is a lot of room in this for regional and international cooperation,” he said.

One such partner with experience to share is Norway, which, until recent years, lost about US $180 million due to illegal fishing.

“Traditional at-sea law enforcement is an important part of our enforcement,” said Gunnar Stolvik of the Norwegian National Advisory Group against Organized Illegal Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing.

Norway has found that vessels that engage in IUU fishing in the North Atlantic also targeted West African waters, a situation which required cooperation between the two regions.

“We want to know who owns, controls and finances illegal operation,” Mr. Stolvik said. “It is people with money that finance the operation.”

Norway set up a fisheries crime unit at Interpol in February 2012 called Fisheries Crime Working Group (FCWG), which has so far involved several countries, including some from Africa. It had also participated in the establishment of the FCWG in February 2012 in Bangkok, Thailand. Some 20 countries, including Africa states have so far participated in its meetings.

Participants at the roundtable were told that in Namibia, where there are several institutions in place to help and regulate the fisheries sector, some 210 vessels involved in commercial fishing are required to have observers on-board each time they go fishing.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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South-Africa, DRC Presidents Sidestep DRC Crisis

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Read Time:2 Minute, 38 Second

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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South Africa: Banyana Seek First African Title

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Read Time:1 Minute, 39 Second

The Confederation of African Football’s 2012 African Women’s Championship, which kicks off with Banyana Banyana taking on tournament hosts Equatorial Guinea in Malabo on Sunday, will, for South Africa, be about taking their results just one step further than before.

Nigeria have dominated the tournament since its inception, winning eight of the nine African Women’s Championship previously held. South Africa’s opponents on Sunday, Equatorial Guinea, are the only other country to have been crowned continental champions, which they achieved in 2008 with a 2-1 defeat of South Africa.

Runner-up is a position that Banyana Banyana have finished in three times previously. Besides 2008, they ended second in 2004 and 2000, so if the pattern holds they should make the final again. The aim this time would be to take it one step forward and become champions of Africa.

Olympic Games lessons

Competing in the Olympic Games earlier this year certainly boosted the Sasol-sponsored team, which learnt a lot from their group games against 2011 World Cup winners Japan, and Sweden and Canada, who were at the time ranked fourth and seventh in the world.

It was also encouraging that Banyana drew with Nigeria home and away in the lead-up to the London Olympics, with the teams ending 1-1 in Rustenburg and goalless in Lagos.

Now they will try to take the lessons learnt and confidence gained from those games and put them to title-winning use.

Camp

The South African team flew to Equatorial Guinea on Thursday from Cameroon, where they had held held a camp to get used to the conditions they can expect in the African Women’s Championship.

During their camp, they played to a 1-1 draw with Cameroon, who along with Banyana Banyana were Africa’s only representatives at the London Olympics.

Unfortunately, midfielder Yola Jafta was a late scratch from the squad after a medical consultation revealed a hamstring injury she had picked up would not mend in time for the tournament.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Poor Infrastructure Is Africa’s Soft Underbelly

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Read Time:4 Minute, 16 Second

In one of Africa’s most ambitious investment decisions, South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma has unveiled a plan to spend $97 billion on infrastructure over the next three years to upgrade roads, ports, and transportation networks aimed at accessing coal and other minerals.

President Zuma’s proposals were immediately supported by the powerful Congress of South African Trade Unions,whose Secretary-General ZwelinzimaVavi said it “pressed all the right buttons.”

But some international rating agencies are skeptical of the ambitious plan. Global Credit Rating, which rates 1,000 organizations and debt issuers in over 30 countries, has warned that the projects are likely to be hampered by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s recent downgrading of the country’s sovereign rating. Global Credit Rating is concerned about a lack of “certainty on the financial feasibility of these initiatives” due to “diminished capacity” to manage political and economic challenges.

The challenge for South Africa is not to make decisions based on what might appear to be diminished capacity to manage infrastructure projects. To the contrary, these investments are an opportunity for South Africa to leverage infrastructure as the foundation for economic and technological renewal.

South Africa’s bold move to focus on infrastructure is not just a matter of assessing the rate of return on specific investments. It is about building the core foundations for economic growth. Ratings approaches that assume the existence of basic infrastructure often fail to appreciate the gravity of Africa’s infrastructure challenges.

Take agriculture as an example. Africa continues to suffer from low levels of agricultural productivity and is constantly bedeviled by famines. A large part of the continent’s inability to feed itself and stimulate rural entrepreneurship can be explained by poor infrastructure (transportation, energy, irrigation, and telecommunication).

Poor road networks illustrate this point. African farmers without adequate road networks are condemned to grow not what they can eat, but what they can carry on their heads and eat quickly before pests destroy it. As a result, nearly half of the hungry people in Africa are farmers.

The majority of Africa’s rural populations do not live within reach of all-season roads. As a result they are not capable of participating in any meaningful entrepreneurial activities. On average, in middle-income countries about 60% of rural people live within two kilometers of an all-season road.

In Kenya, for example, only about 32% of the rural people live within two kilometers of an all-weather road. The figure is 31% for Angola, 26% for Malawi, 24% for Tanzania, 18% for Mali and a mere 10.5% for Ethiopia. Expanding rural road networks (in addition to investing in electrification and irrigation) is a strategic investment for rural development and should not be judged against narrowly defined economic criteria.

According to the World Bank, the continent’s infrastructure deficit is considered one of the most significant barriers to sustaining Africa’s growth. It is estimated that the continent will need to invest nearly $93 billion per year over the next decade to bridge the deficit. Some estimates put the budget for Nigeria alone at $15 billion per year.South Africa’s plan is part of a long-term infrastructure strategy to be implemented over the next 15 years at the cost of $462 billion.

A wide range of creative ideas are emerging to address the financial gap. The African Development Bank (AfDB) has proposed to issue a $40 billion bond to support infrastructure development in Africa. AfBD President Dr. Donald Kaberuka has pointed out that African governments have $450 billion in foreign reserves earning low or zero interest. Investing just 5% of the money would generate $22 billion for the infrastructure bond that would be guaranteed by AfDB.

In addition to undergirding economic growth and generating employment, such investments also stimulate the development of engineering capabilities, which in turn foster entrepreneurship.Such investments provide opportunities for African countries to work with international partners to build the engineering and managerial capabilities needed to design, build, and maintain infrastructure projects.

Furthermore, this is also an opportunity for the private sector to work closely with government to design new engineering courses, programs, and colleges that are aligned with needs of the projects.

African countries are already coming up with creative responses to shortages of engineers. Uganda, for example, has revived a defunct college and converted it into Uganda University of Military Science and Technology. The university, administered by the Uganda People’s Defence Force, has already started graduating railway engineers.

This approach shows the potential of creating engineering universities within line ministries to support infrastructure development. Such creative solutions are emerging at a time when more African countries are electing to high offices leaders with technical training. (For details on the rising African technocracy, see this post.)

South Africa is providing vital leadership for other African countries by recognizing the critical role that infrastructure plays in economic development. Economic models that fail to accommodate this reality are likely to meet their Waterloo in Africa.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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West Africa: UN Health Agency Calls for Help With De-Worming Efforts in Sahel Region

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Read Time:2 Minute, 7 Second

Countries gripped by a hunger crisis in West Africa’s Sahel region urgently need additional help to combat a series of intestinal-worm and other Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) that have spread in the wake of regional flooding, the United Nations health agency said today.

According to the UN World Health Organization (WHO), simple de-worming interventions will ensure that people can fully benefit from the food aid distributed.

“Humanitarian (agencies) should come out in full force and support de-worming activities in affected countries as malnourished children and adults are very susceptible to contracting these NTDs, transmitted via contaminated water, soil and parasites,” said WHO’s African Regional Director, Dr Luis Gomes Sambo, in a news release.

NTDs are a group of poverty-associated chronic infectious diseases – such as bilharzia, roundworms, hookworms and whipworms – that are endemic in poor and rural populations in the developing countries of Africa, America and Asia, according to WHO.

The diseases affect over 1.4 billion people worldwide, and cause severe morbidity and mortality, and are transmitted by insect bites, flies, water contact or worms in the soil, and are easily spread in areas of poor sanitation.

Dr. Gomes said the flooding created the “ideal breeding ground” for contracting NTDs and worm-like diseases in the Sahel region, which spans Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger, amongst other countries. As a consequence, they are now “more at risk of malnutrition,” he added.

The Sahel region has been gripped by prolonged drought and internal conflict, with nearly 19 million people currently food insecure, including more than one million severely malnourished children under the age five years.

The agency said the number of food insecure people in the region is likely to increase because of the rise in the number of NTD cases, with NTD cases also on the rise because of low quality drinking water and inadequate latrine coverage that coincide with the Sahel flooding.

“The full impact of the Sahel crisis will only be felt in the months ahead on people’s livelihoods,” the health agency noted in the news release. “Integrating de-worming activities is… feasible and cost-effective – costing less than 50 cents to treat a person for a year.”

It added the low cost was “especially important” because only half of $1.6 billion of an appeal for Burkina Faso, Mali, Chad, Mauritania and Niger have been received.

Cholera outbreaks in several countries of the Sahel have exacerbated the situation, and the problem is extending to Central African countries, such as Chad and Cameroon, WHO noted.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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Sudan: African Union Supports Abyei Referendum in 2013 but Gives Six Weeks for a Deal

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Read Time:2 Minute, 24 Second

Khartoum — The African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) announced on Thursday it support to the organization of a referendum in Abyei next year, but gave the parties six weeks to reach a compromise over the issue.

The Council met on 24 October to discuss the progress made by Sudan and South Sudan after the signing of a cooperation agreement including oil exportation, trade and security arrangements.

However Sudanese president Omer Al-Bashir and his South Sudanese counterpart Salva Kiir failed to reach a deal on Abyei and five areas on the common border claimed by the two parties.

The mediation just before the meeting handed a proposal to the two head of states saying a referendum should be held in October 2013 without the participation of the Misseriya nomads.

Juba accepted the proposal as it copes with its demand and Khartoum rejected it reiterating its commitment to a previous deal the mediation had proposed in November 2010 calling to divide the region if they fail to agree on the issue.

The AUPSC requested in a communiqué released on Thursday Khartoum and Juba to discuss Abyei issue on the basis of the recent proposal the mediation made, and decided to give them six weeks from the date of the adoption of the communiqué to strike a deal.

It further demanded the African mediation team led by the chief mediator Thabo Mbeki to ” report to it on the results of this engagement, immediately upon the expiration of the six-week period mentioned above”.

The council went further to say that in case they fail to agree on the issue during the six week, “Council will endorse the 21 September 2012 Proposal as final and binding, and would seek the endorsement by the UN Security Council of the same.”

In Khartoum, the official media did not report the decision or mention it.

However the official news agency, SUNA, reported on Wednesday that First Vice President Ali Osman Taha held a meeting with Misseriya tribal leaders.

Following the meeting, Al-Khair Al-Fahim, co-chair of Abyei steering committee told reporters that the Misseriya’s vision fully concurs with the government’s position over the need of a solution ensuring peaceful coexistence and reconciliation with the Ngok Dinka.

He further said the South Sudanese government “wants a referendum in line with its desires over the eligibility of voters, the formation of the referendum commission and the law organising the process.”

He reiterated that the referendum is not a good solution because its outcomes will lead to create discontent from a side or another.

He further added they have no idea about the Russian proposal to support Abyei’s partition on the level of the UN Security Council.

Mikhail Margelov, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s special envoy for cooperation with African countries. Met with the Sudanese president on 6 October where he discussed Khartoum’s position over Abyei with him.

About Post Author

Anthony Claret

Anthony-Claret is a software Engineer, entrepreneur and the founder of Codewit INC. Mr. Claret publishes and manages the content on Codewit Word News website and associated websites. He's a writer, IT Expert, great administrator, technology enthusiast, social media lover and all around digital guy.
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